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Understanding the challenges that people living with a disability face when accessing sexual and reproductive healthcare (SRH), and ensuring their rights are upheld, sits at the heart of Fianakaviana Sambatras’ (FISA) mission to reach vulnerable groups.
SFHA, an IPPF Member Association, provides reproductive health and family planning services through a permanent clinic in the capital city of Apia, and a mobile unit which visits rural areas and the outer islands to provide educational and contraceptive services.
This 16 Days of Activism not only highlights the existence of sexual and gender-based violence in every society, but it also aims to challenge the silence and impunity that surrounds it in so many parts of the world.
Myths, misconceptions and misinformation about periods feed into stigma which can be hugely damaging for many girls, women and people who menstruate around the world.
1 in 3 women globally experience violence across the course of their lives – that’s around 736 million women who suffer physical, mental and/or sexual violence from an intimate partner or non-partner.
This year, we are putting the spotlight on the links between gender-based violence and the world of work. This could mean the violence and harassment women face while working, or on their way to/from work, or the harm they face at home which has an impact on their working lives.
Once again, we are proud to stand with organizations around the world to highlight 16 Days of Activism Against Gender-Based Violence, which runs annually from 25 November to 10 December. Yet, we are obviously disappointed that we need to – and we hope that one day we never have to mark it again.
This year marks the 25th anniversary of International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD) – a defining moment for sexual and reproductive health and rights. But what is ICPD and how did it revolutionize our approach to sexual and reproductive health and rights?
UHC means that all people can obtain basic health services when they need them, without suffering financial hardship – because health is a fundamental human right. Achieving this is vital as healthy populations can better contribute socially and economically, while poor health is a major driver of poverty.
This year marks the 50th anniversary of the riots, a moment of resistance by lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender people against discrimination, police harassment and exploitation. Fifty years on from the riots we ask ourselves; how much progress has been made for the rights of the LGBTI community?