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Articles by Indonesia

SPRINT
26 April 2022

SPRINT: Sexual and reproductive health in crisis and post-crisis situations

  The SPRINT Initiative provides one of the most important aspects of humanitarian assistance that is often forgotten when disaster and conflicts strike: access to essential life-saving sexual and reproductive health services. We build capacity of humanitarian workers to deliver essential life-saving sexual and reproductive health services in crisis and post-crisis situations through the delivery of the Minimum Initial Service Package (MISP) for reproductive health in emergencies.   Through funding from the Australian Government's Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT), our SPRINT Initiative has brought sexual and reproductive health to the humanitarian agenda, increased capacity and responded to a number of humanitarian emergencies. Australia has funded the SPRINT initiative since 2007. Since then, the SPRINT initiative has responded to 105 humanitarian crises and worked with partners in 99 countries. SPRINT has reached over 1,138,175 people, delivering 2,133,141 crucial SRH services, and continues to respond to ongoing emergencies. In each priority country, we work with an IPPF Member Association to coordinate and implement life-saving sexual and reproductive activities. Through these partnerships, SPRINT helps strengthen the enabling environment, improve national capacity and provide lifesaving services during times of crisis. You can read more about IPPF Humanitarian’s Programme here. Australia's location in the Indo-Pacific provides DFAT with a unique perspective on humanitarian action. Australia is committed to helping partner governments manage crisis response themselves. This is done through building the capacity of the national government and civil society to be able to respond to disaster. DFAT also works with experienced international partners to prepare for and respond to disasters, including other donors, United Nations agencies, the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement and non-government organisations.          

Herlina and her baby
05 August 2021

Surviving an earthquake as a young mother during COVID-19

Women and children are the most vulnerable in every humanitarian crisis. The earthquake in West Sulawesi, which took place in January, was no different. A young Indonesian mother, Herlina shares her story on being displaced whilst breastfeeding her newborn baby.  18-year-old Herlina experienced every mother’s fear. At 1.20am on 15 January 2021, a 6.2 magnitude earthquake struck the West Sulawesi province in Indonesia killing 35, injuring hundreds, and leaving over 15,000 thousand displaced – including young Herlina. At the time of the earthquake, Herlina’s daughter Nur Filsa Rahmi was just six days old. The challenges of breastfeeding during a crisis Herlina travelled to safety with her baby to nearby shelter in Tubo Selatan Village, Malunda District, West Sulawesi. Although she is married, her husband lives away for work purposes which meant travelling alone with little or no support. Once in the shelter camp, Herlina and her baby had to face cold weather conditions and it became a challenge to buy nutritious food to produce enough breastmilk for her baby Nur Filsa. Despite her sudden fate, Herlina was grateful while in shelter camp as she could still keep herself and her baby clean. However, it proved difficult to find a safe area in the camp for breastfeeding. "In shelter camps, on average, men and women were mixed. Each time I need to breastfeed, I had to find some space privately,” she said. After a month in the shelter camp, Herlina and baby Nur finally returned home safely. The Indonesia Planned Parenthood Association (IPPA) health volunteer team visited Herlina at home to provide sexual and reproductive healthcare services, specifically advising Herlina on postpartum care. The team also gave Herlina dignity kits, including sanitary pads, underclothes, and soap to maintain proper hygiene, which is a common challenge in displaced communities.  A rise in unintended pregnancies during COVID-19 Though Herlina’s pregnancy was planned, unintended pregnancies in Indonesia have risen in general amid the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic due to restricted access to contraceptive services. "The National Population and Family Planning Board (BKKBN) predicted that unwanted pregnancies would rise by 15% amid the COVID-19 pandemic," said Dati Fatimah, consultant of the Australia Indonesia Partnership for Justice (AIPJ2). The secretary-general of the Indonesian Women’s Coalition (KPI), Mike Verawati Tangka, said the trend was mainly caused by limited access to birth control services. The pandemic had deterred a lot of people from using or continuing to use contraceptives as they were reluctant to visit health facilities over fear of coronavirus transmission. The operations of some health facilities, such as community health centers (Puskesmas) and integrated health posts (Posyandu), have also faced disruptions, with some even temporarily halting their contraceptive services. A recent study from the Health Ministry revealed that around 30% of Puskesmas across the archipelago were inactive during the pandemic.  The surge in unintended pregnancies in the country may have also contributed to the rise of child, early and forced marriages (CEFM). "The number one reason for requesting CEFM dispensation at court is unwanted teen pregnancies," Mr Tungka said. Dati said marriage exemption requests had increased during the outbreak, from 23,700 cases in 2019 to 34,000 cases as of June 2020. 97% of the requests were granted by the court. Working to curb child, early and forced marriages The Head of the Technical Implementing Unit of Women Empowerment and Child Protection Office of Majene, Asrianti, explained that in a survey on the number of CEFM in Indonesia, West Sulawesi had ranked first out of 34 provinces in 2018, while in 2019 and 2020 it was in third place. The high rate of CEFM in the area, said Asrianti, also has an impact on the high rate of babies’ stunted height growth in Majene Regency. This is due to a lack of understanding of young mothers on how to take care of their health and nutrition during pregnancy. "We all know that in Majene Regency, stunting is in the second position [in Indonesia].” said Asrianti. However, this does not mean that the local government in Majene has not acted to prevent CEFM. The Women Empowerment and Child Protection Office of the Majene Regency often provides counselling to young girls about the importance of education on reproductive health. "We [the Women Empowerment and Child Protection Office] often hold counselling to enrich adolescent girls with education, especially those who are still in grade six of elementary school. Because at that age they are able to understand the issues,” said Asrianti. Regarding the arrival of the IPPA/PKBI volunteer team for a humanitarian mission in Majene, Asrianti welcomed it: "Thank you PKBI for this humanitarian mission. May the accompaniment and the assistance for mothers here be of benefit to women who are earthquake survivors – both those who are still staying in the shelter camp and those who have return to their homes." 

Atashendartini Habsjah
13 November 2019

Women's empowerment in Indonesia: In conversation with feminist activist Atashendartini Habsjah

In the 25 years since ICPD in Cairo, there have been few campaigns for Indonesian women’s health and reproductive rights Atashendartini Habsjah has not been involved in. From her work within the Indonesian Planned Parenthood to mentoring the next crop of changemakers, Habsjah’s influence has shaped the lives of millions of women. “I became a feminist then,” Habsjah says of meeting her mentor, Professor Saparinah Sadli, who joins her at this makeshift ICPD reunion. As a researcher at Atma Jaya University studying maternal and post-natal health in 1989, her work led her to meet the professor, as well as longtime activists Tini Hadad and Ninuk Widyantoro.  All four women have been integral to developing reproductive rights and access in Indonesia and today they’re sharing a table, some tea and faith that future generations will bring change. Like everything in Indonesia, and in Indonesian women’s activism particularly, collectivism and support are key. That’s what got Atashendartini Habsjah to Cairo 25 years ago, she says.   Getting to Cairo “I started in 1989 and the time working on a safe motherhood program, ‘Sayang Ibu,’ at the Ministry of Women Empowerment. I was doing research and through that met with Professor Saparinah Sadli who was the head of women’s studies at the University of Indonesia,” Habsjah says. Through her research, she found herself deeper involved in organizations related to women’s causes in the country. “I wanted to be involved in the condition of women and girls.” Slow-moving change failing to address the needs of women is what drove Habsjah to Cairo. Commiserating on challenges with delegates from other countries and — crucially — sharing strategies to find ways to progress regardless. Delegations from the Global South are particularly fondly remembered for their support both in the years leading up to Cairo and after. Programme of Action “No,” is the blunt answer from the group on Indonesia’s success in implementing the Programme of Action decided on 25 years ago. The access to contraceptives has improved slightly over the decades, but education on choices remain low. Access to abortion, which remains technically illegal in most instances but can be found via quiet organizations, is very much on the mind of Habsjah and her activist colleagues.  Indonesia’s Criminal Code has, until recently, been a hangover of the Dutch occupation. Efforts to reform it has been strongly resisted by civil society for what they say could further criminalise aspects of safe family planning. If the reforms pass in the upcoming parliamentary session, abortion in all instances, even if a pregnancy threatens the life of the woman, will be illegal.  “The Code is very difficult to change,” Habsjah says, foreshadowing a fight for future generations. “Abortion will still be prohibited. That’s why we work a lot with women’s organizations and young people to make them aware. They’re coming to the Women’s Health Foundation [an initiative between the Indonesian and Australian governments] because they feel frustrated, where else can they go?” All four women worry that access to contraceptives is going to become more difficult. Women in the further-flung provinces of the sprawling archipelago already struggle to find support and the use of long-term contraceptives like IUDs is consistently dropping. The legal reforms will “curb freedoms,” Habsjah says. All four fear an increase in the prevalence of HIV/AIDS, an issue that has been left out of the reforms debate. The future of reproductive health in Indonesia A quarter of a century on, all four women agree emphatically that one of the greatest challenges facing Indonesian women’s health and well-being is the involvement of men. While women have always been leaders on the frontline and at the grassroots, men must do more to effect lasting change and improve the lives of women. Historically, men have largely been disinterested but change is in the air.  “One component is men’s involvement in reproductive health and we try always,” Habsjah says with a laugh. It’s the younger women, though, that this table of generations of changemakers believes in. “Now we have a bunch of new, younger generations who will hopefully continue our spirit and our fight.”   

Indri, a volunteer from Indonesia
15 February 2019

Indonesia: Youth volunteerism in the aftermath of a triple disaster

Emergency appeal for the Tsunami & Earthquake in Indonesia
02 October 2018

Emergency appeal for the earthquake and tsunami in Indonesia

Updated 18 October 2018 We are continuing our response to the earthquake and tsunami of 28 September through our local partner the Indonesia Planned Parenthood Association. The latest death tolls stands at over 2,100 people and sadly, is expected to rise. Our response team remains on the ground and our supplies have started to arrive, such as much needed contraceptives and mobile sexual and reproductive tents. Our response During all emergencies, women and marginalised groups are the most vulnerable. In the coming days, and weeks, we will continue to expand our reach to the 78,994 people still displaced by this double disaster with clinical services such as prenatal care, STI and HIV screenings, contraceptive provision and gender based violence screening. Our team from the Indonesia Planned Parenthood Association has been operating locally since 1957 so is well placed to respond to the needs to the local population and work closely with the Indonesia Government in their response efforts. Our emergency appeal  Our emergency fund will allow us to reach more people with these much needed, and overlooked, services. 100 percent of the donations made to this fund will go directly to our partner the Indonesia Planned Parenthood Association to allow them to continue their services. Please donate now. Donate now Our Member Association, the Indonesia Planned Parenthood Association (IPPA) has an office and clinic in Palu City and is currently sending additional support from other IPPA offices to Palu. As well as undertaking initial assessments of the urgent SRH needs, the team will distribute prepositioned hygiene kits to affected communities. IPPA has also sent their medical doctor from Makassar to the field as part of a joint outreach team with the Indonesian Government health response team.  Satyawanti Mashudi, Executive Director of IPPA, says:  "Indonesia has been rocked by a series of natural disasters lately, but Friday’s earthquake and tsunami double disaster has caused a catastrophic amount of destruction and loss of life. We are grateful that all our local staff have been safely accounted for, and now our attention must go towards the affected communities and their sexual and reproductive health needs. With tens of thousands of people sleeping in temporary shelters, and many more displaced, we know from experience the SRH needs will be high, and urgent."   With a total population of 1.5 million in affected areas, we know that as many as 375,000 of those are women of reproductive age, 300,000 are sexually active men and as many as 27,225 women could be pregnant. It is crucial we can reach these populations during the initial days and weeks after the disaster to provide life-saving SRH care.  Donate now

H.E. Ambassador Takashi Shinozuka, Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of Japan to Morocco and Dr Latifa Mokhtar JAMAI, President of AMPF, IPPF’s Member Association in Morocco, at the JTF project launch ceremony
30 March 2017

Japan Trust Fund

The Japan Trust Fund (JTF) represents a visionary partnership that began in 2000 between the Government of Japan and IPPF. Together, we invest in programmes that prioritize health equity, gender equality, and human security for all. Traditionally a driving force behind IPPF's efforts to support the integrated HIV prevention programmes of our Member Associations in Africa and Asia, JTF has adjusted to reflect changing global health priorities. We attach importance to universal access to sexual and reproductive health and rights - an essential contributor to universal health coverage and the global development goals.     These projects have transformed the lives of people most vulnerable to HIV and high risk of maternal and child mortality. Equally, it ensures that as a donor, the GOJ’s response to HIV remains people-centred and contributes to human security.      

Girls Decide landing image
30 June 2016

Girls Decide

This programme addresses critical challenges faced by young women around sexual health and sexuality. It has produced a range of advocacy, education and informational materials to support research, awareness-raising, advocacy and service delivery.    Girls Decide is about the sexual and reproductive health and rights of girls and young women. Around the world, girls aged 10 to 19 account for 23% of all disease associated with pregnancy and childbirth. An estimated 2.5 million have unsafe abortions every year. Worldwide, young women account for 60% of the 5.5 million young people living with HIV and/or AIDS. Girls Decide has produced a range of advocacy, education and informational materials to support work to improve sexual health and rights for girls and young women. These include a series of films on sexual and reproductive health decisions faced by 6 young women in 6 different countries. The films won the prestigious International Video and Communications Award (IVCA). When girls and young women have access to critical lifesaving services and information, and when they are able to make meaningful choices about their life path, they are empowered. Their quality of life improves, as does the well-being of their families and the communities in which they live. Their collective ability to achieve internationally agreed development goals is strengthened. Almost all IPPF Member Associations provide services to young people and 1 in every 3 clients is a young person below the age of 25. All young women and girls are rights-holders and are entitled to sexual and reproductive rights. As a matter of principle, the IPPF Secretariat and Member Associations stand by girls by respecting and fulfilling their right to high quality services; they stand up for girls by supporting them in making their own decisions related to sexuality and pregnancy; they stand for sexual and reproductive rights by addressing the challenges faced by young women and girls at local, national and international levels.

Indonesian Planned Parenthood Association

In 1957 the Indonesian planned parenthood association (IPPA) was established with the aim of realizing responsible parenthood believing that family is the main pillar in realizing community welfare. Responsible parenthood is understood and interpreted through the dimensions of birth, education, health, welfare and the future.

Values:

  • Respect human dignity, regardless of sex, sexual orientation, gender, marital status, people with HIV, people living with disabilities, religion, race, ethnicity, political orientation, social and economic status.
  • Upholding the values of democracy, non-discrimination, gender equality and justice, social justice, personal autonomy, freedom of thought, opinion, expression and association.
  • Upholding and mainstreaming sexual and reproductive health rights in all situations and opportunities.
  • Stick to volunteerism, pioneering work, professionalism, trustworthiness, transparency, independence, sustainability and justice.

Vision:

  • Responsible and inclusive Indonesian family and society.

Mission:

  • Empowering the community to create a responsible family.
  • Building an inclusive youth movement.
  • Providing comprehensive, professional and inclusive sexual and reproductive health services.
  • Influencing and empowering policy makers to respect, protect, and fulfil SRHR.
  • Develop a professional organization to achieve independence and sustainability.
SPRINT
26 April 2022

SPRINT: Sexual and reproductive health in crisis and post-crisis situations

  The SPRINT Initiative provides one of the most important aspects of humanitarian assistance that is often forgotten when disaster and conflicts strike: access to essential life-saving sexual and reproductive health services. We build capacity of humanitarian workers to deliver essential life-saving sexual and reproductive health services in crisis and post-crisis situations through the delivery of the Minimum Initial Service Package (MISP) for reproductive health in emergencies.   Through funding from the Australian Government's Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT), our SPRINT Initiative has brought sexual and reproductive health to the humanitarian agenda, increased capacity and responded to a number of humanitarian emergencies. Australia has funded the SPRINT initiative since 2007. Since then, the SPRINT initiative has responded to 105 humanitarian crises and worked with partners in 99 countries. SPRINT has reached over 1,138,175 people, delivering 2,133,141 crucial SRH services, and continues to respond to ongoing emergencies. In each priority country, we work with an IPPF Member Association to coordinate and implement life-saving sexual and reproductive activities. Through these partnerships, SPRINT helps strengthen the enabling environment, improve national capacity and provide lifesaving services during times of crisis. You can read more about IPPF Humanitarian’s Programme here. Australia's location in the Indo-Pacific provides DFAT with a unique perspective on humanitarian action. Australia is committed to helping partner governments manage crisis response themselves. This is done through building the capacity of the national government and civil society to be able to respond to disaster. DFAT also works with experienced international partners to prepare for and respond to disasters, including other donors, United Nations agencies, the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement and non-government organisations.          

Herlina and her baby
05 August 2021

Surviving an earthquake as a young mother during COVID-19

Women and children are the most vulnerable in every humanitarian crisis. The earthquake in West Sulawesi, which took place in January, was no different. A young Indonesian mother, Herlina shares her story on being displaced whilst breastfeeding her newborn baby.  18-year-old Herlina experienced every mother’s fear. At 1.20am on 15 January 2021, a 6.2 magnitude earthquake struck the West Sulawesi province in Indonesia killing 35, injuring hundreds, and leaving over 15,000 thousand displaced – including young Herlina. At the time of the earthquake, Herlina’s daughter Nur Filsa Rahmi was just six days old. The challenges of breastfeeding during a crisis Herlina travelled to safety with her baby to nearby shelter in Tubo Selatan Village, Malunda District, West Sulawesi. Although she is married, her husband lives away for work purposes which meant travelling alone with little or no support. Once in the shelter camp, Herlina and her baby had to face cold weather conditions and it became a challenge to buy nutritious food to produce enough breastmilk for her baby Nur Filsa. Despite her sudden fate, Herlina was grateful while in shelter camp as she could still keep herself and her baby clean. However, it proved difficult to find a safe area in the camp for breastfeeding. "In shelter camps, on average, men and women were mixed. Each time I need to breastfeed, I had to find some space privately,” she said. After a month in the shelter camp, Herlina and baby Nur finally returned home safely. The Indonesia Planned Parenthood Association (IPPA) health volunteer team visited Herlina at home to provide sexual and reproductive healthcare services, specifically advising Herlina on postpartum care. The team also gave Herlina dignity kits, including sanitary pads, underclothes, and soap to maintain proper hygiene, which is a common challenge in displaced communities.  A rise in unintended pregnancies during COVID-19 Though Herlina’s pregnancy was planned, unintended pregnancies in Indonesia have risen in general amid the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic due to restricted access to contraceptive services. "The National Population and Family Planning Board (BKKBN) predicted that unwanted pregnancies would rise by 15% amid the COVID-19 pandemic," said Dati Fatimah, consultant of the Australia Indonesia Partnership for Justice (AIPJ2). The secretary-general of the Indonesian Women’s Coalition (KPI), Mike Verawati Tangka, said the trend was mainly caused by limited access to birth control services. The pandemic had deterred a lot of people from using or continuing to use contraceptives as they were reluctant to visit health facilities over fear of coronavirus transmission. The operations of some health facilities, such as community health centers (Puskesmas) and integrated health posts (Posyandu), have also faced disruptions, with some even temporarily halting their contraceptive services. A recent study from the Health Ministry revealed that around 30% of Puskesmas across the archipelago were inactive during the pandemic.  The surge in unintended pregnancies in the country may have also contributed to the rise of child, early and forced marriages (CEFM). "The number one reason for requesting CEFM dispensation at court is unwanted teen pregnancies," Mr Tungka said. Dati said marriage exemption requests had increased during the outbreak, from 23,700 cases in 2019 to 34,000 cases as of June 2020. 97% of the requests were granted by the court. Working to curb child, early and forced marriages The Head of the Technical Implementing Unit of Women Empowerment and Child Protection Office of Majene, Asrianti, explained that in a survey on the number of CEFM in Indonesia, West Sulawesi had ranked first out of 34 provinces in 2018, while in 2019 and 2020 it was in third place. The high rate of CEFM in the area, said Asrianti, also has an impact on the high rate of babies’ stunted height growth in Majene Regency. This is due to a lack of understanding of young mothers on how to take care of their health and nutrition during pregnancy. "We all know that in Majene Regency, stunting is in the second position [in Indonesia].” said Asrianti. However, this does not mean that the local government in Majene has not acted to prevent CEFM. The Women Empowerment and Child Protection Office of the Majene Regency often provides counselling to young girls about the importance of education on reproductive health. "We [the Women Empowerment and Child Protection Office] often hold counselling to enrich adolescent girls with education, especially those who are still in grade six of elementary school. Because at that age they are able to understand the issues,” said Asrianti. Regarding the arrival of the IPPA/PKBI volunteer team for a humanitarian mission in Majene, Asrianti welcomed it: "Thank you PKBI for this humanitarian mission. May the accompaniment and the assistance for mothers here be of benefit to women who are earthquake survivors – both those who are still staying in the shelter camp and those who have return to their homes." 

Atashendartini Habsjah
13 November 2019

Women's empowerment in Indonesia: In conversation with feminist activist Atashendartini Habsjah

In the 25 years since ICPD in Cairo, there have been few campaigns for Indonesian women’s health and reproductive rights Atashendartini Habsjah has not been involved in. From her work within the Indonesian Planned Parenthood to mentoring the next crop of changemakers, Habsjah’s influence has shaped the lives of millions of women. “I became a feminist then,” Habsjah says of meeting her mentor, Professor Saparinah Sadli, who joins her at this makeshift ICPD reunion. As a researcher at Atma Jaya University studying maternal and post-natal health in 1989, her work led her to meet the professor, as well as longtime activists Tini Hadad and Ninuk Widyantoro.  All four women have been integral to developing reproductive rights and access in Indonesia and today they’re sharing a table, some tea and faith that future generations will bring change. Like everything in Indonesia, and in Indonesian women’s activism particularly, collectivism and support are key. That’s what got Atashendartini Habsjah to Cairo 25 years ago, she says.   Getting to Cairo “I started in 1989 and the time working on a safe motherhood program, ‘Sayang Ibu,’ at the Ministry of Women Empowerment. I was doing research and through that met with Professor Saparinah Sadli who was the head of women’s studies at the University of Indonesia,” Habsjah says. Through her research, she found herself deeper involved in organizations related to women’s causes in the country. “I wanted to be involved in the condition of women and girls.” Slow-moving change failing to address the needs of women is what drove Habsjah to Cairo. Commiserating on challenges with delegates from other countries and — crucially — sharing strategies to find ways to progress regardless. Delegations from the Global South are particularly fondly remembered for their support both in the years leading up to Cairo and after. Programme of Action “No,” is the blunt answer from the group on Indonesia’s success in implementing the Programme of Action decided on 25 years ago. The access to contraceptives has improved slightly over the decades, but education on choices remain low. Access to abortion, which remains technically illegal in most instances but can be found via quiet organizations, is very much on the mind of Habsjah and her activist colleagues.  Indonesia’s Criminal Code has, until recently, been a hangover of the Dutch occupation. Efforts to reform it has been strongly resisted by civil society for what they say could further criminalise aspects of safe family planning. If the reforms pass in the upcoming parliamentary session, abortion in all instances, even if a pregnancy threatens the life of the woman, will be illegal.  “The Code is very difficult to change,” Habsjah says, foreshadowing a fight for future generations. “Abortion will still be prohibited. That’s why we work a lot with women’s organizations and young people to make them aware. They’re coming to the Women’s Health Foundation [an initiative between the Indonesian and Australian governments] because they feel frustrated, where else can they go?” All four women worry that access to contraceptives is going to become more difficult. Women in the further-flung provinces of the sprawling archipelago already struggle to find support and the use of long-term contraceptives like IUDs is consistently dropping. The legal reforms will “curb freedoms,” Habsjah says. All four fear an increase in the prevalence of HIV/AIDS, an issue that has been left out of the reforms debate. The future of reproductive health in Indonesia A quarter of a century on, all four women agree emphatically that one of the greatest challenges facing Indonesian women’s health and well-being is the involvement of men. While women have always been leaders on the frontline and at the grassroots, men must do more to effect lasting change and improve the lives of women. Historically, men have largely been disinterested but change is in the air.  “One component is men’s involvement in reproductive health and we try always,” Habsjah says with a laugh. It’s the younger women, though, that this table of generations of changemakers believes in. “Now we have a bunch of new, younger generations who will hopefully continue our spirit and our fight.”   

Indri, a volunteer from Indonesia
15 February 2019

Indonesia: Youth volunteerism in the aftermath of a triple disaster

Emergency appeal for the Tsunami & Earthquake in Indonesia
02 October 2018

Emergency appeal for the earthquake and tsunami in Indonesia

Updated 18 October 2018 We are continuing our response to the earthquake and tsunami of 28 September through our local partner the Indonesia Planned Parenthood Association. The latest death tolls stands at over 2,100 people and sadly, is expected to rise. Our response team remains on the ground and our supplies have started to arrive, such as much needed contraceptives and mobile sexual and reproductive tents. Our response During all emergencies, women and marginalised groups are the most vulnerable. In the coming days, and weeks, we will continue to expand our reach to the 78,994 people still displaced by this double disaster with clinical services such as prenatal care, STI and HIV screenings, contraceptive provision and gender based violence screening. Our team from the Indonesia Planned Parenthood Association has been operating locally since 1957 so is well placed to respond to the needs to the local population and work closely with the Indonesia Government in their response efforts. Our emergency appeal  Our emergency fund will allow us to reach more people with these much needed, and overlooked, services. 100 percent of the donations made to this fund will go directly to our partner the Indonesia Planned Parenthood Association to allow them to continue their services. Please donate now. Donate now Our Member Association, the Indonesia Planned Parenthood Association (IPPA) has an office and clinic in Palu City and is currently sending additional support from other IPPA offices to Palu. As well as undertaking initial assessments of the urgent SRH needs, the team will distribute prepositioned hygiene kits to affected communities. IPPA has also sent their medical doctor from Makassar to the field as part of a joint outreach team with the Indonesian Government health response team.  Satyawanti Mashudi, Executive Director of IPPA, says:  "Indonesia has been rocked by a series of natural disasters lately, but Friday’s earthquake and tsunami double disaster has caused a catastrophic amount of destruction and loss of life. We are grateful that all our local staff have been safely accounted for, and now our attention must go towards the affected communities and their sexual and reproductive health needs. With tens of thousands of people sleeping in temporary shelters, and many more displaced, we know from experience the SRH needs will be high, and urgent."   With a total population of 1.5 million in affected areas, we know that as many as 375,000 of those are women of reproductive age, 300,000 are sexually active men and as many as 27,225 women could be pregnant. It is crucial we can reach these populations during the initial days and weeks after the disaster to provide life-saving SRH care.  Donate now

H.E. Ambassador Takashi Shinozuka, Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of Japan to Morocco and Dr Latifa Mokhtar JAMAI, President of AMPF, IPPF’s Member Association in Morocco, at the JTF project launch ceremony
30 March 2017

Japan Trust Fund

The Japan Trust Fund (JTF) represents a visionary partnership that began in 2000 between the Government of Japan and IPPF. Together, we invest in programmes that prioritize health equity, gender equality, and human security for all. Traditionally a driving force behind IPPF's efforts to support the integrated HIV prevention programmes of our Member Associations in Africa and Asia, JTF has adjusted to reflect changing global health priorities. We attach importance to universal access to sexual and reproductive health and rights - an essential contributor to universal health coverage and the global development goals.     These projects have transformed the lives of people most vulnerable to HIV and high risk of maternal and child mortality. Equally, it ensures that as a donor, the GOJ’s response to HIV remains people-centred and contributes to human security.      

Girls Decide landing image
30 June 2016

Girls Decide

This programme addresses critical challenges faced by young women around sexual health and sexuality. It has produced a range of advocacy, education and informational materials to support research, awareness-raising, advocacy and service delivery.    Girls Decide is about the sexual and reproductive health and rights of girls and young women. Around the world, girls aged 10 to 19 account for 23% of all disease associated with pregnancy and childbirth. An estimated 2.5 million have unsafe abortions every year. Worldwide, young women account for 60% of the 5.5 million young people living with HIV and/or AIDS. Girls Decide has produced a range of advocacy, education and informational materials to support work to improve sexual health and rights for girls and young women. These include a series of films on sexual and reproductive health decisions faced by 6 young women in 6 different countries. The films won the prestigious International Video and Communications Award (IVCA). When girls and young women have access to critical lifesaving services and information, and when they are able to make meaningful choices about their life path, they are empowered. Their quality of life improves, as does the well-being of their families and the communities in which they live. Their collective ability to achieve internationally agreed development goals is strengthened. Almost all IPPF Member Associations provide services to young people and 1 in every 3 clients is a young person below the age of 25. All young women and girls are rights-holders and are entitled to sexual and reproductive rights. As a matter of principle, the IPPF Secretariat and Member Associations stand by girls by respecting and fulfilling their right to high quality services; they stand up for girls by supporting them in making their own decisions related to sexuality and pregnancy; they stand for sexual and reproductive rights by addressing the challenges faced by young women and girls at local, national and international levels.

Indonesian Planned Parenthood Association

In 1957 the Indonesian planned parenthood association (IPPA) was established with the aim of realizing responsible parenthood believing that family is the main pillar in realizing community welfare. Responsible parenthood is understood and interpreted through the dimensions of birth, education, health, welfare and the future.

Values:

  • Respect human dignity, regardless of sex, sexual orientation, gender, marital status, people with HIV, people living with disabilities, religion, race, ethnicity, political orientation, social and economic status.
  • Upholding the values of democracy, non-discrimination, gender equality and justice, social justice, personal autonomy, freedom of thought, opinion, expression and association.
  • Upholding and mainstreaming sexual and reproductive health rights in all situations and opportunities.
  • Stick to volunteerism, pioneering work, professionalism, trustworthiness, transparency, independence, sustainability and justice.

Vision:

  • Responsible and inclusive Indonesian family and society.

Mission:

  • Empowering the community to create a responsible family.
  • Building an inclusive youth movement.
  • Providing comprehensive, professional and inclusive sexual and reproductive health services.
  • Influencing and empowering policy makers to respect, protect, and fulfil SRHR.
  • Develop a professional organization to achieve independence and sustainability.