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News

Latest news from IPPF

Spotlight

A selection of news from across the Federation

The Kenyan flag - black, red and green horizontal stripes with a shield in the middle

Kenya

News item

Kenyan High Court makes landmark ruling on safe abortion care

Kenyan High Court rules that safe abortion care is a fundamental right in a landmark verdict today that protects patients and healthcare providers from arbitrary arrests and prosecution.
A healthcare worker in India tends to a child - Amitava Chandra
news item

| 30 March 2022

IPPF recognized as a very high scorer in the 2022 Global Health 50/50 Report

The International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) has been recognized as a very high scorer in the 2022 Global Health 50/50 Report entitled Boards for All? A review of power, policy and people on the boards of organisations active in global health.  This is the first time Global Health 50/50 have included an analysis board membership across 147 global health organizations, alongside their annual analysis of gender-related policies and practices of 200 organizations. IPPF obtained the highest possible score for board diversity of G based on a review of our board policies and practices that have specific measures in place to promote diversity, inclusion and representation that are publicly available. IPPF’s current board has nine women, one-third are young people under 25 years of age, and over half are nationals from low-and middle-income countries. In addition, for the first time this year, Global Health 50/50 2022 have accessed and consolidated organizations performances across the past 3-5 years. IPPF is one of 19 organizations recognized as a very high scorer, and places IPPF in the top 10% of sample organizations used in the report.  IPPF’s Seri Wendoh, Global Lead for Gender & Inclusion said: “Once again, IPPF has been recognised as a very high scorer in the Global Health 50/50 for our gender-related policies and practices. Once again, this is a testament to the dedication of colleagues and the work that is being done behind the scenes at IPPF to meaningfully include and implement gender equality, diversity and inclusion at the core of organization. As always there is more we need to do, but I have no doubt that we will continue to listen, to learn, and to act deliberately to ensure IPPF is an even more inclusive, feminist and diverse organization where everyone feels seen and valued.” Kate Gilmore, IPPF’s Board of Trustees chair said:  “Nothing makes me prouder when sitting in an IPPF board meeting to look across at my fellow trustees in all our diversity, with our different lived experiences, at different stages of life, with our mix of expertise and our global reach and relevance. That’s what makes IPPF such a unique and special place to be a part of. It’s why it is a privilege to chair such a board.  It is also why I am very proud that Global Health 50/50 has given us the highest possible score for our Board’s dedication to diversity, inclusion and global representation, as well as identifying IPPF as a consistent very high scorer for our gender-related policies and practices.” IPPF’s Director-General Dr Alvaro Bermejo said: “I’m pleased to see that IPPF is a very high scorer in the 2022 Global Health 50/50 report and received the highest possible score for our board diversity, inclusion and representation. Our diversity allows us to keep challenging ourselves and committing to improving how we center people in our care and help them exercise their full sexual and reproductive rights and freedoms. For global membership organizations, maximising diversity and inclusion at all levels is investing in a richness of knowledge, expertise and lived experiences, which can accelerate our common goal of providing the best possible care to those who walk through our doors.” Professor Sarah Hawkes and Professor Kent Buse, Co-Directors, Global Health 50/50  said: Congratulations to IPPF on their strong performance in the 2022 Global Health 50/50 Report. Through commitment, learning and action IPPF showcases that progress towards gender equality and the more equitable sharing of power and opportunity in global health is possible in the collective effort to deliver health for all. Bravo!” Read the report in full Main image courtesy of Amitava Chandra

A healthcare worker in India tends to a child - Amitava Chandra
news_item

| 30 March 2022

IPPF recognized as a very high scorer in the 2022 Global Health 50/50 Report

The International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) has been recognized as a very high scorer in the 2022 Global Health 50/50 Report entitled Boards for All? A review of power, policy and people on the boards of organisations active in global health.  This is the first time Global Health 50/50 have included an analysis board membership across 147 global health organizations, alongside their annual analysis of gender-related policies and practices of 200 organizations. IPPF obtained the highest possible score for board diversity of G based on a review of our board policies and practices that have specific measures in place to promote diversity, inclusion and representation that are publicly available. IPPF’s current board has nine women, one-third are young people under 25 years of age, and over half are nationals from low-and middle-income countries. In addition, for the first time this year, Global Health 50/50 2022 have accessed and consolidated organizations performances across the past 3-5 years. IPPF is one of 19 organizations recognized as a very high scorer, and places IPPF in the top 10% of sample organizations used in the report.  IPPF’s Seri Wendoh, Global Lead for Gender & Inclusion said: “Once again, IPPF has been recognised as a very high scorer in the Global Health 50/50 for our gender-related policies and practices. Once again, this is a testament to the dedication of colleagues and the work that is being done behind the scenes at IPPF to meaningfully include and implement gender equality, diversity and inclusion at the core of organization. As always there is more we need to do, but I have no doubt that we will continue to listen, to learn, and to act deliberately to ensure IPPF is an even more inclusive, feminist and diverse organization where everyone feels seen and valued.” Kate Gilmore, IPPF’s Board of Trustees chair said:  “Nothing makes me prouder when sitting in an IPPF board meeting to look across at my fellow trustees in all our diversity, with our different lived experiences, at different stages of life, with our mix of expertise and our global reach and relevance. That’s what makes IPPF such a unique and special place to be a part of. It’s why it is a privilege to chair such a board.  It is also why I am very proud that Global Health 50/50 has given us the highest possible score for our Board’s dedication to diversity, inclusion and global representation, as well as identifying IPPF as a consistent very high scorer for our gender-related policies and practices.” IPPF’s Director-General Dr Alvaro Bermejo said: “I’m pleased to see that IPPF is a very high scorer in the 2022 Global Health 50/50 report and received the highest possible score for our board diversity, inclusion and representation. Our diversity allows us to keep challenging ourselves and committing to improving how we center people in our care and help them exercise their full sexual and reproductive rights and freedoms. For global membership organizations, maximising diversity and inclusion at all levels is investing in a richness of knowledge, expertise and lived experiences, which can accelerate our common goal of providing the best possible care to those who walk through our doors.” Professor Sarah Hawkes and Professor Kent Buse, Co-Directors, Global Health 50/50  said: Congratulations to IPPF on their strong performance in the 2022 Global Health 50/50 Report. Through commitment, learning and action IPPF showcases that progress towards gender equality and the more equitable sharing of power and opportunity in global health is possible in the collective effort to deliver health for all. Bravo!” Read the report in full Main image courtesy of Amitava Chandra

An illustration of a group of healthcare workers talking
news item

| 28 March 2022

IPPF launches medical abortion course

IPPF and HowToUse have developed a free online medical abortion training for the full range of healthcare workers, including physicians, midwives, pharmacists, medical students and community health workers. The training will equip health workers with the necessary skills to provide care for women seeking medical abortion up to 13 weeks’ gestation. The training is focused on person-centered care and includes a module on supporting women in medical abortion self-care. As abortion care continues to be left off medical training curriculums, this training will fill a critical gap in the education of many health workers. It has the potential to significantly increase the number of health workers with the skills and knowledge to provide abortion care, especially in low-resource settings, and thereby increase the number of women supported to safely end a pregnancy.  The updated WHO Abortion Care Guideline includes recommendations to make most abortions - especially early abortions - a simple primary care level intervention. The guideline recommends that medical abortion up to 12 weeks can be managed by a range of trained health workers including community health workers, pharmacists and pharmacy workers and midwives, as well as by the pregnant individuals.  The training, which is a video series available for free in English, French, Spanish, Arabic, Portuguese and Russian, is designed to equip these health workers with the relevant skills to provide medical abortion care. The course can be accessed from desktop or mobile and is structured to be an interactive learning experience, complete with quizzes and an option to download a certificate upon successful completion. To access the course, click here.

An illustration of a group of healthcare workers talking
news_item

| 28 March 2022

IPPF launches medical abortion course

IPPF and HowToUse have developed a free online medical abortion training for the full range of healthcare workers, including physicians, midwives, pharmacists, medical students and community health workers. The training will equip health workers with the necessary skills to provide care for women seeking medical abortion up to 13 weeks’ gestation. The training is focused on person-centered care and includes a module on supporting women in medical abortion self-care. As abortion care continues to be left off medical training curriculums, this training will fill a critical gap in the education of many health workers. It has the potential to significantly increase the number of health workers with the skills and knowledge to provide abortion care, especially in low-resource settings, and thereby increase the number of women supported to safely end a pregnancy.  The updated WHO Abortion Care Guideline includes recommendations to make most abortions - especially early abortions - a simple primary care level intervention. The guideline recommends that medical abortion up to 12 weeks can be managed by a range of trained health workers including community health workers, pharmacists and pharmacy workers and midwives, as well as by the pregnant individuals.  The training, which is a video series available for free in English, French, Spanish, Arabic, Portuguese and Russian, is designed to equip these health workers with the relevant skills to provide medical abortion care. The course can be accessed from desktop or mobile and is structured to be an interactive learning experience, complete with quizzes and an option to download a certificate upon successful completion. To access the course, click here.

The Kenyan flag - black, red and green horizontal stripes with a shield in the middle
news item

| 28 March 2022

Kenyan High Court makes landmark ruling on safe abortion care

In a landmark verdict today, the High Court of Malindi has ruled that safe abortion care is a fundamental right under the Constitution of Kenya and that arbitrary arrests and prosecution of patients and healthcare providers, for seeking or offering such services, is completely illegal. Specifically, the Court ruled that: Abortion care is a fundamental right under the Constitution of Kenya and that arbitrary arrests and prosecution of patients and healthcare providers seeking or offering such services is illegal. Protecting access to abortion impacts vital Constitutional values, including dignity, autonomy, equality, and bodily integrity. Criminalizing abortion under Penal Code without Constitutional statutory framework is an impairment to the enjoyment of women’s reproductive right. For years, women and girls in Kenya have faced sustained and pervasive discrimination hampering their access to seeking reproductive healthcare services; the 1963 Penal Code criminalizes all abortion care, including those allowed under the Constitution 2010, which guarantees the right to healthcare, including access to reproductive health services. The Constitution only permits safe abortion if in the opinion of a trained health professional, there is need for emergency treatment, or the life or health of the mother is at risk/in danger. The court case in question, filed in November 2020, involved PAK, a minor 16 years of age from Kilifi County. PAK experienced complications during pregnancy and immediately sought medical care at a nearby clinic where a trained clinical officer attended to her. Upon examining her, the clinical officer determined that she had lost the pregnancy and proceeded to provide her with essential and life-saving post-abortion care. Policy officers stormed the clinic, in the midst of the treatment, stopping the medical procedure and confiscating PAK’s treatment records. They then proceeded to illegally arrest both PAK and the clinical officer. Both were taken to Ganze Police Patrol Base where PAK was not allowed to access further medical care for the next two days and was forced to sign a statement which was contrary to PAK’s description of the events. The police also forced PAK to undergo another detailed medical examination at Kilifi County Hospital to obtain evidence to prove the alleged offence of abortion. The clinical officer was detained for one week while PAK was remanded to a juvenile remand for more than a month, whilst she and her family sought to secure the cash bail for her release. The Malindi High Court has further directed the Parliament to enact an abortion law and public policy framework that aligns with the Kenyan Constitution. Additionally, the Court has confirmed that communication between a patient and the healthcare provider is confidential, which is guaranteed and protected under the Constitution and other enabling laws, save for where the disclosure is consented to by the patient or is in the public interest in line with the limitations as provided for in the Constitution. In its decision, the Court also ruled that PAK was recovering from medical procedure and police did not have the medical qualifications to determine and confirm that she was medically-fit to leave the clinic, regardless of her admission status at the clinic. Additionally, the Court found that PAK’s arrest was inhuman and degrading, and being a minor, she ought not to have been interrogated without legal representation. Marie-Evelyne Petrus-Barry, Africa Regional Director from the International Planned Parenthood Federation, said: “We are absolutely delighted to hear this news and applaud the High Court of Malindi's ruling confirming that abortion care is a fundamental right under the Constitution of Kenya and that arbitrary arrests and prosecution of patients and healthcare providers for seeking or offering such services is illegal. We are also very pleased to hear that the Court has directed Parliament to enact an abortion law and public policy framework that aligns with the Constitution. This is a victory for women and girls not only in Kenya, but across Africa! Access to quality abortion is essential to guarantee the health and reproductive rights of women and girls everywhere. At IPPF, we are committed to reducing the number of deaths of women and girls who are forced to turn to unsafe abortion methods for fear of arrests and harassment. We will continue to supply and support safe and legal abortion services and care for women and girls everywhere.” The petitioners were represented by the Center for Reproductive Rights a network of reproductive health providers whose member was the second petitioner in this case and a collaborative partner of IPPF. The advocates were Martin Onyango, Head of Legal Strategies for Africa, and Prudence Mutiso, Legal Advisor for Africa. Nelly Munyasia, Executive Director of Reproductive Health Network Kenya (RHNK), , welcomed the court’s decision: “Many qualified reproductive healthcare practitioners continue to be arrested, detained, and prosecuted for providing legal medical care. The court’s decision confirms that prosecution against health providers cannot hold where the prosecution has not established that; the health professional in question was unqualified to conduct the procedure; the life or health of the woman was not in danger or the woman was not in need of emergency treatment,” Ms. Munyasia said. Evelyne Opondo, Senior Regional Director for Africa at Center for Reproductive Rights said: “Today’s victory is for all women, girls, and healthcare providers who have been treated as criminals for seeking and providing abortion care. The court has vindicated our position by affirming that forcing a woman to carry an unwanted pregnancy to term or to seek out an unsafe abortion is a gross violation of her rights to privacy and bodily autonomy. Further, the continued restrictive abortion laws inhibit quality improvement possible to protect women with unintended pregnancies.” Center fact sheet: “The Impact of the Misalignment Between Kenya’s Constitution and the Penal Code on Access to Reproductive Health Care”

The Kenyan flag - black, red and green horizontal stripes with a shield in the middle
news_item

| 26 March 2022

Kenyan High Court makes landmark ruling on safe abortion care

In a landmark verdict today, the High Court of Malindi has ruled that safe abortion care is a fundamental right under the Constitution of Kenya and that arbitrary arrests and prosecution of patients and healthcare providers, for seeking or offering such services, is completely illegal. Specifically, the Court ruled that: Abortion care is a fundamental right under the Constitution of Kenya and that arbitrary arrests and prosecution of patients and healthcare providers seeking or offering such services is illegal. Protecting access to abortion impacts vital Constitutional values, including dignity, autonomy, equality, and bodily integrity. Criminalizing abortion under Penal Code without Constitutional statutory framework is an impairment to the enjoyment of women’s reproductive right. For years, women and girls in Kenya have faced sustained and pervasive discrimination hampering their access to seeking reproductive healthcare services; the 1963 Penal Code criminalizes all abortion care, including those allowed under the Constitution 2010, which guarantees the right to healthcare, including access to reproductive health services. The Constitution only permits safe abortion if in the opinion of a trained health professional, there is need for emergency treatment, or the life or health of the mother is at risk/in danger. The court case in question, filed in November 2020, involved PAK, a minor 16 years of age from Kilifi County. PAK experienced complications during pregnancy and immediately sought medical care at a nearby clinic where a trained clinical officer attended to her. Upon examining her, the clinical officer determined that she had lost the pregnancy and proceeded to provide her with essential and life-saving post-abortion care. Policy officers stormed the clinic, in the midst of the treatment, stopping the medical procedure and confiscating PAK’s treatment records. They then proceeded to illegally arrest both PAK and the clinical officer. Both were taken to Ganze Police Patrol Base where PAK was not allowed to access further medical care for the next two days and was forced to sign a statement which was contrary to PAK’s description of the events. The police also forced PAK to undergo another detailed medical examination at Kilifi County Hospital to obtain evidence to prove the alleged offence of abortion. The clinical officer was detained for one week while PAK was remanded to a juvenile remand for more than a month, whilst she and her family sought to secure the cash bail for her release. The Malindi High Court has further directed the Parliament to enact an abortion law and public policy framework that aligns with the Kenyan Constitution. Additionally, the Court has confirmed that communication between a patient and the healthcare provider is confidential, which is guaranteed and protected under the Constitution and other enabling laws, save for where the disclosure is consented to by the patient or is in the public interest in line with the limitations as provided for in the Constitution. In its decision, the Court also ruled that PAK was recovering from medical procedure and police did not have the medical qualifications to determine and confirm that she was medically-fit to leave the clinic, regardless of her admission status at the clinic. Additionally, the Court found that PAK’s arrest was inhuman and degrading, and being a minor, she ought not to have been interrogated without legal representation. Marie-Evelyne Petrus-Barry, Africa Regional Director from the International Planned Parenthood Federation, said: “We are absolutely delighted to hear this news and applaud the High Court of Malindi's ruling confirming that abortion care is a fundamental right under the Constitution of Kenya and that arbitrary arrests and prosecution of patients and healthcare providers for seeking or offering such services is illegal. We are also very pleased to hear that the Court has directed Parliament to enact an abortion law and public policy framework that aligns with the Constitution. This is a victory for women and girls not only in Kenya, but across Africa! Access to quality abortion is essential to guarantee the health and reproductive rights of women and girls everywhere. At IPPF, we are committed to reducing the number of deaths of women and girls who are forced to turn to unsafe abortion methods for fear of arrests and harassment. We will continue to supply and support safe and legal abortion services and care for women and girls everywhere.” The petitioners were represented by the Center for Reproductive Rights a network of reproductive health providers whose member was the second petitioner in this case and a collaborative partner of IPPF. The advocates were Martin Onyango, Head of Legal Strategies for Africa, and Prudence Mutiso, Legal Advisor for Africa. Nelly Munyasia, Executive Director of Reproductive Health Network Kenya (RHNK), , welcomed the court’s decision: “Many qualified reproductive healthcare practitioners continue to be arrested, detained, and prosecuted for providing legal medical care. The court’s decision confirms that prosecution against health providers cannot hold where the prosecution has not established that; the health professional in question was unqualified to conduct the procedure; the life or health of the woman was not in danger or the woman was not in need of emergency treatment,” Ms. Munyasia said. Evelyne Opondo, Senior Regional Director for Africa at Center for Reproductive Rights said: “Today’s victory is for all women, girls, and healthcare providers who have been treated as criminals for seeking and providing abortion care. The court has vindicated our position by affirming that forcing a woman to carry an unwanted pregnancy to term or to seek out an unsafe abortion is a gross violation of her rights to privacy and bodily autonomy. Further, the continued restrictive abortion laws inhibit quality improvement possible to protect women with unintended pregnancies.” Center fact sheet: “The Impact of the Misalignment Between Kenya’s Constitution and the Penal Code on Access to Reproductive Health Care”

banner of CSW66
news item

| 26 March 2022

Statement on the outcome of Commission on the Status of Women (CSW 66)

For the first time, the Commission on the Status of Women (CSW) has adopted Agreed Conclusions on gender equality and the empowerment of all women and girls in the context of climate change, environmental and disaster risk reduction policies and programmes. IPPF has actively engaged in the process by providing technical inputs and raising awareness about the interlinkages between SRHR, climate change, gender equality and the empowerment and human rights of all women and girls.  IPPF welcomes CSW’s recognition that sexual and reproductive health and rights are critical to ensuring women’s resilience and adaptation to climate and humanitarian crises. As well as climate change is a gendered crisis and disproportionately affects women and girls in all their diversity while recognizing the importance of climate adaptation and resilience for women and girls in the context of climate change, environmental degradation and humanitarian crises.  Additionally, we welcome references to comprehensive sexuality education, multiple intersecting forms of discrimination, reslience and adaptation, access to justice and accountability of violations, and civil society organizations' meaningful participation, including feminist organizations and women human rights defenders.  Consensus reached at this year’s Commission reflects the broad based support of Member States to take gender-responsive action to address and tackle the climate crisis - a crisis that is happening now and requires immediate and urgent action.

banner of CSW66
news_item

| 26 March 2022

Statement on the outcome of Commission on the Status of Women (CSW 66)

For the first time, the Commission on the Status of Women (CSW) has adopted Agreed Conclusions on gender equality and the empowerment of all women and girls in the context of climate change, environmental and disaster risk reduction policies and programmes. IPPF has actively engaged in the process by providing technical inputs and raising awareness about the interlinkages between SRHR, climate change, gender equality and the empowerment and human rights of all women and girls.  IPPF welcomes CSW’s recognition that sexual and reproductive health and rights are critical to ensuring women’s resilience and adaptation to climate and humanitarian crises. As well as climate change is a gendered crisis and disproportionately affects women and girls in all their diversity while recognizing the importance of climate adaptation and resilience for women and girls in the context of climate change, environmental degradation and humanitarian crises.  Additionally, we welcome references to comprehensive sexuality education, multiple intersecting forms of discrimination, reslience and adaptation, access to justice and accountability of violations, and civil society organizations' meaningful participation, including feminist organizations and women human rights defenders.  Consensus reached at this year’s Commission reflects the broad based support of Member States to take gender-responsive action to address and tackle the climate crisis - a crisis that is happening now and requires immediate and urgent action.

Opening of the IPPF Americas and the Caribbean Office, Bogotá Colombia March 14th 2022
news item

| 18 March 2022

IPPF Office in Bogota

We are overjoyed to announce the opening of the first of two locations of the International Planned Parenthood Federation -  Americas and the Caribbean Regional Office (ACRO), in Bogota, Colombia. IPPF Director-General Dr. Alvaro Bermejo, IPPF ACRO's Regional Director Eugenia López Uribe, Deputy Regional Director Dona Da Costa Martinez, and IPPF Director of External Relations Mina Barling were joined by team members from the ACRO and London Offices to reinforce the commitment to the fight for rights and access to sexual and reproductive services in the region. This is an especially exciting time as Colombia stands as the latest champion to step forward to protect the bodily autonomy of everyone with the possibility of gestation, with a recent Constitutional Court victory legalizing access to abortion until 24 weeks. The new IPPF Americas and the Caribbean Regional Office serves Member Associations and Collaborative Partners in over 24 countries across the region, and which are growing in their movement building and service delivery capabilities, including comprehensive sex education, provision of contraceptive, safe abortion, and maternal care and responding to humanitarian crisis. IPPF pride ourselves on being local through our members and global through our network. At the heart of our mission is the provision of – and advocacy in support of – integrated healthcare to anyone who needs it regardless of race, gender, sex, income, and crucially no matter how remote. Volunteerism is central to our healthcare delivery. It underpins the vital work of our members and their teams, whether through community outreach and distribution of contraceptive care or the regional Youth Action Movements championing change.  

Opening of the IPPF Americas and the Caribbean Office, Bogotá Colombia March 14th 2022
news_item

| 17 March 2022

IPPF Office in Bogota

We are overjoyed to announce the opening of the first of two locations of the International Planned Parenthood Federation -  Americas and the Caribbean Regional Office (ACRO), in Bogota, Colombia. IPPF Director-General Dr. Alvaro Bermejo, IPPF ACRO's Regional Director Eugenia López Uribe, Deputy Regional Director Dona Da Costa Martinez, and IPPF Director of External Relations Mina Barling were joined by team members from the ACRO and London Offices to reinforce the commitment to the fight for rights and access to sexual and reproductive services in the region. This is an especially exciting time as Colombia stands as the latest champion to step forward to protect the bodily autonomy of everyone with the possibility of gestation, with a recent Constitutional Court victory legalizing access to abortion until 24 weeks. The new IPPF Americas and the Caribbean Regional Office serves Member Associations and Collaborative Partners in over 24 countries across the region, and which are growing in their movement building and service delivery capabilities, including comprehensive sex education, provision of contraceptive, safe abortion, and maternal care and responding to humanitarian crisis. IPPF pride ourselves on being local through our members and global through our network. At the heart of our mission is the provision of – and advocacy in support of – integrated healthcare to anyone who needs it regardless of race, gender, sex, income, and crucially no matter how remote. Volunteerism is central to our healthcare delivery. It underpins the vital work of our members and their teams, whether through community outreach and distribution of contraceptive care or the regional Youth Action Movements championing change.  

USAID logo
news item

| 30 March 2022

IPPF Part of Team Funded by USAID to Implement Global Health Equity Project

The International Planned Parenthood Federation has joined an international network to promote and sustain improved health and agency in low- and middle-income countries through Agency for All Project The U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) has funded a $38 million, five-year project led by the Center on Gender Equity and Health (GEH) at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Herbert Wertheim School of Public Health and Human Longevity Science. The project is an international, multi-institutional effort to understand and promote agency for individuals, communities and local organizations in low- and middle-income countries. “Agency for All” is intended to develop and foster social and behavioral research resulting in a better understanding of how to promote the voices of local people within their own communities and within health and development programming. It addresses multiple dimensions of health and well-being, including maternal and child health, infectious disease, HIV/AIDS, family planning and reproductive health. The program will work with diverse populations across the globe, with a focus on Africa and South Asia. GEH will coordinate the consortium of global, regional and local leaders to conduct research and implement solutions, informed by local priorities and agendas, said Rebecka Lundgren, PhD, an applied anthropologist and associate professor of infectious diseases and global public health, who will serve as project director.  “Agency for All will look at the complex questions of ‘agency,’ and what that means for different people, organizations and systems around the world, as well as for our own consortium partners,” said Lundgren. “We are honored to bring together a global consortium of world class researchers and implementers to discover what works to convert intention into action within social and behavior change programs and make it work for real people.” The initiative will concentrate on three geographical areas or hubs in East Africa, West Africa and South Asia, collaborating with specific organizations and networks in those regions. In addition to the International Planned Parenthood Federation, these partners include the Centre for Catalyzing Change (India), Evidence for Sustainable Human Development Systems in Africa (Cameroon), Makerere University (Uganda), Matchboxology (South Africa), Sambodhi (India), Shujaaz, Inc. (Kenya), University of Witwatersrand (South Africa), CORE Group, Promundo-US, Save the Children and Viamo. “These locally-led partnerships are critical,” said Paul Bukuluki, PhD, director of research for Agency for All and an associate professor at Makerere University. “We hope to develop context-specific mechanisms for measuring agency, and more effectively evaluate the approaches that help us improve the quality of life of women and men at the margins of society.” About the Center on Gender Equity and Health  The GEH conducts multidisciplinary research to understand and eliminate gender inequities, specifically in the areas of child marriage, unpaid labor, gender-based violence and gender social norms.  It is directed by Anita Raj, PhD, professor of infectious diseases and global public health in the UC San Diego School of Medicine. 

USAID logo
news_item

| 15 March 2022

IPPF Part of Team Funded by USAID to Implement Global Health Equity Project

The International Planned Parenthood Federation has joined an international network to promote and sustain improved health and agency in low- and middle-income countries through Agency for All Project The U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) has funded a $38 million, five-year project led by the Center on Gender Equity and Health (GEH) at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Herbert Wertheim School of Public Health and Human Longevity Science. The project is an international, multi-institutional effort to understand and promote agency for individuals, communities and local organizations in low- and middle-income countries. “Agency for All” is intended to develop and foster social and behavioral research resulting in a better understanding of how to promote the voices of local people within their own communities and within health and development programming. It addresses multiple dimensions of health and well-being, including maternal and child health, infectious disease, HIV/AIDS, family planning and reproductive health. The program will work with diverse populations across the globe, with a focus on Africa and South Asia. GEH will coordinate the consortium of global, regional and local leaders to conduct research and implement solutions, informed by local priorities and agendas, said Rebecka Lundgren, PhD, an applied anthropologist and associate professor of infectious diseases and global public health, who will serve as project director.  “Agency for All will look at the complex questions of ‘agency,’ and what that means for different people, organizations and systems around the world, as well as for our own consortium partners,” said Lundgren. “We are honored to bring together a global consortium of world class researchers and implementers to discover what works to convert intention into action within social and behavior change programs and make it work for real people.” The initiative will concentrate on three geographical areas or hubs in East Africa, West Africa and South Asia, collaborating with specific organizations and networks in those regions. In addition to the International Planned Parenthood Federation, these partners include the Centre for Catalyzing Change (India), Evidence for Sustainable Human Development Systems in Africa (Cameroon), Makerere University (Uganda), Matchboxology (South Africa), Sambodhi (India), Shujaaz, Inc. (Kenya), University of Witwatersrand (South Africa), CORE Group, Promundo-US, Save the Children and Viamo. “These locally-led partnerships are critical,” said Paul Bukuluki, PhD, director of research for Agency for All and an associate professor at Makerere University. “We hope to develop context-specific mechanisms for measuring agency, and more effectively evaluate the approaches that help us improve the quality of life of women and men at the margins of society.” About the Center on Gender Equity and Health  The GEH conducts multidisciplinary research to understand and eliminate gender inequities, specifically in the areas of child marriage, unpaid labor, gender-based violence and gender social norms.  It is directed by Anita Raj, PhD, professor of infectious diseases and global public health in the UC San Diego School of Medicine. 

A healthcare worker in India tends to a child - Amitava Chandra
news item

| 30 March 2022

IPPF recognized as a very high scorer in the 2022 Global Health 50/50 Report

The International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) has been recognized as a very high scorer in the 2022 Global Health 50/50 Report entitled Boards for All? A review of power, policy and people on the boards of organisations active in global health.  This is the first time Global Health 50/50 have included an analysis board membership across 147 global health organizations, alongside their annual analysis of gender-related policies and practices of 200 organizations. IPPF obtained the highest possible score for board diversity of G based on a review of our board policies and practices that have specific measures in place to promote diversity, inclusion and representation that are publicly available. IPPF’s current board has nine women, one-third are young people under 25 years of age, and over half are nationals from low-and middle-income countries. In addition, for the first time this year, Global Health 50/50 2022 have accessed and consolidated organizations performances across the past 3-5 years. IPPF is one of 19 organizations recognized as a very high scorer, and places IPPF in the top 10% of sample organizations used in the report.  IPPF’s Seri Wendoh, Global Lead for Gender & Inclusion said: “Once again, IPPF has been recognised as a very high scorer in the Global Health 50/50 for our gender-related policies and practices. Once again, this is a testament to the dedication of colleagues and the work that is being done behind the scenes at IPPF to meaningfully include and implement gender equality, diversity and inclusion at the core of organization. As always there is more we need to do, but I have no doubt that we will continue to listen, to learn, and to act deliberately to ensure IPPF is an even more inclusive, feminist and diverse organization where everyone feels seen and valued.” Kate Gilmore, IPPF’s Board of Trustees chair said:  “Nothing makes me prouder when sitting in an IPPF board meeting to look across at my fellow trustees in all our diversity, with our different lived experiences, at different stages of life, with our mix of expertise and our global reach and relevance. That’s what makes IPPF such a unique and special place to be a part of. It’s why it is a privilege to chair such a board.  It is also why I am very proud that Global Health 50/50 has given us the highest possible score for our Board’s dedication to diversity, inclusion and global representation, as well as identifying IPPF as a consistent very high scorer for our gender-related policies and practices.” IPPF’s Director-General Dr Alvaro Bermejo said: “I’m pleased to see that IPPF is a very high scorer in the 2022 Global Health 50/50 report and received the highest possible score for our board diversity, inclusion and representation. Our diversity allows us to keep challenging ourselves and committing to improving how we center people in our care and help them exercise their full sexual and reproductive rights and freedoms. For global membership organizations, maximising diversity and inclusion at all levels is investing in a richness of knowledge, expertise and lived experiences, which can accelerate our common goal of providing the best possible care to those who walk through our doors.” Professor Sarah Hawkes and Professor Kent Buse, Co-Directors, Global Health 50/50  said: Congratulations to IPPF on their strong performance in the 2022 Global Health 50/50 Report. Through commitment, learning and action IPPF showcases that progress towards gender equality and the more equitable sharing of power and opportunity in global health is possible in the collective effort to deliver health for all. Bravo!” Read the report in full Main image courtesy of Amitava Chandra

A healthcare worker in India tends to a child - Amitava Chandra
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| 30 March 2022

IPPF recognized as a very high scorer in the 2022 Global Health 50/50 Report

The International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) has been recognized as a very high scorer in the 2022 Global Health 50/50 Report entitled Boards for All? A review of power, policy and people on the boards of organisations active in global health.  This is the first time Global Health 50/50 have included an analysis board membership across 147 global health organizations, alongside their annual analysis of gender-related policies and practices of 200 organizations. IPPF obtained the highest possible score for board diversity of G based on a review of our board policies and practices that have specific measures in place to promote diversity, inclusion and representation that are publicly available. IPPF’s current board has nine women, one-third are young people under 25 years of age, and over half are nationals from low-and middle-income countries. In addition, for the first time this year, Global Health 50/50 2022 have accessed and consolidated organizations performances across the past 3-5 years. IPPF is one of 19 organizations recognized as a very high scorer, and places IPPF in the top 10% of sample organizations used in the report.  IPPF’s Seri Wendoh, Global Lead for Gender & Inclusion said: “Once again, IPPF has been recognised as a very high scorer in the Global Health 50/50 for our gender-related policies and practices. Once again, this is a testament to the dedication of colleagues and the work that is being done behind the scenes at IPPF to meaningfully include and implement gender equality, diversity and inclusion at the core of organization. As always there is more we need to do, but I have no doubt that we will continue to listen, to learn, and to act deliberately to ensure IPPF is an even more inclusive, feminist and diverse organization where everyone feels seen and valued.” Kate Gilmore, IPPF’s Board of Trustees chair said:  “Nothing makes me prouder when sitting in an IPPF board meeting to look across at my fellow trustees in all our diversity, with our different lived experiences, at different stages of life, with our mix of expertise and our global reach and relevance. That’s what makes IPPF such a unique and special place to be a part of. It’s why it is a privilege to chair such a board.  It is also why I am very proud that Global Health 50/50 has given us the highest possible score for our Board’s dedication to diversity, inclusion and global representation, as well as identifying IPPF as a consistent very high scorer for our gender-related policies and practices.” IPPF’s Director-General Dr Alvaro Bermejo said: “I’m pleased to see that IPPF is a very high scorer in the 2022 Global Health 50/50 report and received the highest possible score for our board diversity, inclusion and representation. Our diversity allows us to keep challenging ourselves and committing to improving how we center people in our care and help them exercise their full sexual and reproductive rights and freedoms. For global membership organizations, maximising diversity and inclusion at all levels is investing in a richness of knowledge, expertise and lived experiences, which can accelerate our common goal of providing the best possible care to those who walk through our doors.” Professor Sarah Hawkes and Professor Kent Buse, Co-Directors, Global Health 50/50  said: Congratulations to IPPF on their strong performance in the 2022 Global Health 50/50 Report. Through commitment, learning and action IPPF showcases that progress towards gender equality and the more equitable sharing of power and opportunity in global health is possible in the collective effort to deliver health for all. Bravo!” Read the report in full Main image courtesy of Amitava Chandra

An illustration of a group of healthcare workers talking
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| 28 March 2022

IPPF launches medical abortion course

IPPF and HowToUse have developed a free online medical abortion training for the full range of healthcare workers, including physicians, midwives, pharmacists, medical students and community health workers. The training will equip health workers with the necessary skills to provide care for women seeking medical abortion up to 13 weeks’ gestation. The training is focused on person-centered care and includes a module on supporting women in medical abortion self-care. As abortion care continues to be left off medical training curriculums, this training will fill a critical gap in the education of many health workers. It has the potential to significantly increase the number of health workers with the skills and knowledge to provide abortion care, especially in low-resource settings, and thereby increase the number of women supported to safely end a pregnancy.  The updated WHO Abortion Care Guideline includes recommendations to make most abortions - especially early abortions - a simple primary care level intervention. The guideline recommends that medical abortion up to 12 weeks can be managed by a range of trained health workers including community health workers, pharmacists and pharmacy workers and midwives, as well as by the pregnant individuals.  The training, which is a video series available for free in English, French, Spanish, Arabic, Portuguese and Russian, is designed to equip these health workers with the relevant skills to provide medical abortion care. The course can be accessed from desktop or mobile and is structured to be an interactive learning experience, complete with quizzes and an option to download a certificate upon successful completion. To access the course, click here.

An illustration of a group of healthcare workers talking
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| 28 March 2022

IPPF launches medical abortion course

IPPF and HowToUse have developed a free online medical abortion training for the full range of healthcare workers, including physicians, midwives, pharmacists, medical students and community health workers. The training will equip health workers with the necessary skills to provide care for women seeking medical abortion up to 13 weeks’ gestation. The training is focused on person-centered care and includes a module on supporting women in medical abortion self-care. As abortion care continues to be left off medical training curriculums, this training will fill a critical gap in the education of many health workers. It has the potential to significantly increase the number of health workers with the skills and knowledge to provide abortion care, especially in low-resource settings, and thereby increase the number of women supported to safely end a pregnancy.  The updated WHO Abortion Care Guideline includes recommendations to make most abortions - especially early abortions - a simple primary care level intervention. The guideline recommends that medical abortion up to 12 weeks can be managed by a range of trained health workers including community health workers, pharmacists and pharmacy workers and midwives, as well as by the pregnant individuals.  The training, which is a video series available for free in English, French, Spanish, Arabic, Portuguese and Russian, is designed to equip these health workers with the relevant skills to provide medical abortion care. The course can be accessed from desktop or mobile and is structured to be an interactive learning experience, complete with quizzes and an option to download a certificate upon successful completion. To access the course, click here.

The Kenyan flag - black, red and green horizontal stripes with a shield in the middle
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| 28 March 2022

Kenyan High Court makes landmark ruling on safe abortion care

In a landmark verdict today, the High Court of Malindi has ruled that safe abortion care is a fundamental right under the Constitution of Kenya and that arbitrary arrests and prosecution of patients and healthcare providers, for seeking or offering such services, is completely illegal. Specifically, the Court ruled that: Abortion care is a fundamental right under the Constitution of Kenya and that arbitrary arrests and prosecution of patients and healthcare providers seeking or offering such services is illegal. Protecting access to abortion impacts vital Constitutional values, including dignity, autonomy, equality, and bodily integrity. Criminalizing abortion under Penal Code without Constitutional statutory framework is an impairment to the enjoyment of women’s reproductive right. For years, women and girls in Kenya have faced sustained and pervasive discrimination hampering their access to seeking reproductive healthcare services; the 1963 Penal Code criminalizes all abortion care, including those allowed under the Constitution 2010, which guarantees the right to healthcare, including access to reproductive health services. The Constitution only permits safe abortion if in the opinion of a trained health professional, there is need for emergency treatment, or the life or health of the mother is at risk/in danger. The court case in question, filed in November 2020, involved PAK, a minor 16 years of age from Kilifi County. PAK experienced complications during pregnancy and immediately sought medical care at a nearby clinic where a trained clinical officer attended to her. Upon examining her, the clinical officer determined that she had lost the pregnancy and proceeded to provide her with essential and life-saving post-abortion care. Policy officers stormed the clinic, in the midst of the treatment, stopping the medical procedure and confiscating PAK’s treatment records. They then proceeded to illegally arrest both PAK and the clinical officer. Both were taken to Ganze Police Patrol Base where PAK was not allowed to access further medical care for the next two days and was forced to sign a statement which was contrary to PAK’s description of the events. The police also forced PAK to undergo another detailed medical examination at Kilifi County Hospital to obtain evidence to prove the alleged offence of abortion. The clinical officer was detained for one week while PAK was remanded to a juvenile remand for more than a month, whilst she and her family sought to secure the cash bail for her release. The Malindi High Court has further directed the Parliament to enact an abortion law and public policy framework that aligns with the Kenyan Constitution. Additionally, the Court has confirmed that communication between a patient and the healthcare provider is confidential, which is guaranteed and protected under the Constitution and other enabling laws, save for where the disclosure is consented to by the patient or is in the public interest in line with the limitations as provided for in the Constitution. In its decision, the Court also ruled that PAK was recovering from medical procedure and police did not have the medical qualifications to determine and confirm that she was medically-fit to leave the clinic, regardless of her admission status at the clinic. Additionally, the Court found that PAK’s arrest was inhuman and degrading, and being a minor, she ought not to have been interrogated without legal representation. Marie-Evelyne Petrus-Barry, Africa Regional Director from the International Planned Parenthood Federation, said: “We are absolutely delighted to hear this news and applaud the High Court of Malindi's ruling confirming that abortion care is a fundamental right under the Constitution of Kenya and that arbitrary arrests and prosecution of patients and healthcare providers for seeking or offering such services is illegal. We are also very pleased to hear that the Court has directed Parliament to enact an abortion law and public policy framework that aligns with the Constitution. This is a victory for women and girls not only in Kenya, but across Africa! Access to quality abortion is essential to guarantee the health and reproductive rights of women and girls everywhere. At IPPF, we are committed to reducing the number of deaths of women and girls who are forced to turn to unsafe abortion methods for fear of arrests and harassment. We will continue to supply and support safe and legal abortion services and care for women and girls everywhere.” The petitioners were represented by the Center for Reproductive Rights a network of reproductive health providers whose member was the second petitioner in this case and a collaborative partner of IPPF. The advocates were Martin Onyango, Head of Legal Strategies for Africa, and Prudence Mutiso, Legal Advisor for Africa. Nelly Munyasia, Executive Director of Reproductive Health Network Kenya (RHNK), , welcomed the court’s decision: “Many qualified reproductive healthcare practitioners continue to be arrested, detained, and prosecuted for providing legal medical care. The court’s decision confirms that prosecution against health providers cannot hold where the prosecution has not established that; the health professional in question was unqualified to conduct the procedure; the life or health of the woman was not in danger or the woman was not in need of emergency treatment,” Ms. Munyasia said. Evelyne Opondo, Senior Regional Director for Africa at Center for Reproductive Rights said: “Today’s victory is for all women, girls, and healthcare providers who have been treated as criminals for seeking and providing abortion care. The court has vindicated our position by affirming that forcing a woman to carry an unwanted pregnancy to term or to seek out an unsafe abortion is a gross violation of her rights to privacy and bodily autonomy. Further, the continued restrictive abortion laws inhibit quality improvement possible to protect women with unintended pregnancies.” Center fact sheet: “The Impact of the Misalignment Between Kenya’s Constitution and the Penal Code on Access to Reproductive Health Care”

The Kenyan flag - black, red and green horizontal stripes with a shield in the middle
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| 26 March 2022

Kenyan High Court makes landmark ruling on safe abortion care

In a landmark verdict today, the High Court of Malindi has ruled that safe abortion care is a fundamental right under the Constitution of Kenya and that arbitrary arrests and prosecution of patients and healthcare providers, for seeking or offering such services, is completely illegal. Specifically, the Court ruled that: Abortion care is a fundamental right under the Constitution of Kenya and that arbitrary arrests and prosecution of patients and healthcare providers seeking or offering such services is illegal. Protecting access to abortion impacts vital Constitutional values, including dignity, autonomy, equality, and bodily integrity. Criminalizing abortion under Penal Code without Constitutional statutory framework is an impairment to the enjoyment of women’s reproductive right. For years, women and girls in Kenya have faced sustained and pervasive discrimination hampering their access to seeking reproductive healthcare services; the 1963 Penal Code criminalizes all abortion care, including those allowed under the Constitution 2010, which guarantees the right to healthcare, including access to reproductive health services. The Constitution only permits safe abortion if in the opinion of a trained health professional, there is need for emergency treatment, or the life or health of the mother is at risk/in danger. The court case in question, filed in November 2020, involved PAK, a minor 16 years of age from Kilifi County. PAK experienced complications during pregnancy and immediately sought medical care at a nearby clinic where a trained clinical officer attended to her. Upon examining her, the clinical officer determined that she had lost the pregnancy and proceeded to provide her with essential and life-saving post-abortion care. Policy officers stormed the clinic, in the midst of the treatment, stopping the medical procedure and confiscating PAK’s treatment records. They then proceeded to illegally arrest both PAK and the clinical officer. Both were taken to Ganze Police Patrol Base where PAK was not allowed to access further medical care for the next two days and was forced to sign a statement which was contrary to PAK’s description of the events. The police also forced PAK to undergo another detailed medical examination at Kilifi County Hospital to obtain evidence to prove the alleged offence of abortion. The clinical officer was detained for one week while PAK was remanded to a juvenile remand for more than a month, whilst she and her family sought to secure the cash bail for her release. The Malindi High Court has further directed the Parliament to enact an abortion law and public policy framework that aligns with the Kenyan Constitution. Additionally, the Court has confirmed that communication between a patient and the healthcare provider is confidential, which is guaranteed and protected under the Constitution and other enabling laws, save for where the disclosure is consented to by the patient or is in the public interest in line with the limitations as provided for in the Constitution. In its decision, the Court also ruled that PAK was recovering from medical procedure and police did not have the medical qualifications to determine and confirm that she was medically-fit to leave the clinic, regardless of her admission status at the clinic. Additionally, the Court found that PAK’s arrest was inhuman and degrading, and being a minor, she ought not to have been interrogated without legal representation. Marie-Evelyne Petrus-Barry, Africa Regional Director from the International Planned Parenthood Federation, said: “We are absolutely delighted to hear this news and applaud the High Court of Malindi's ruling confirming that abortion care is a fundamental right under the Constitution of Kenya and that arbitrary arrests and prosecution of patients and healthcare providers for seeking or offering such services is illegal. We are also very pleased to hear that the Court has directed Parliament to enact an abortion law and public policy framework that aligns with the Constitution. This is a victory for women and girls not only in Kenya, but across Africa! Access to quality abortion is essential to guarantee the health and reproductive rights of women and girls everywhere. At IPPF, we are committed to reducing the number of deaths of women and girls who are forced to turn to unsafe abortion methods for fear of arrests and harassment. We will continue to supply and support safe and legal abortion services and care for women and girls everywhere.” The petitioners were represented by the Center for Reproductive Rights a network of reproductive health providers whose member was the second petitioner in this case and a collaborative partner of IPPF. The advocates were Martin Onyango, Head of Legal Strategies for Africa, and Prudence Mutiso, Legal Advisor for Africa. Nelly Munyasia, Executive Director of Reproductive Health Network Kenya (RHNK), , welcomed the court’s decision: “Many qualified reproductive healthcare practitioners continue to be arrested, detained, and prosecuted for providing legal medical care. The court’s decision confirms that prosecution against health providers cannot hold where the prosecution has not established that; the health professional in question was unqualified to conduct the procedure; the life or health of the woman was not in danger or the woman was not in need of emergency treatment,” Ms. Munyasia said. Evelyne Opondo, Senior Regional Director for Africa at Center for Reproductive Rights said: “Today’s victory is for all women, girls, and healthcare providers who have been treated as criminals for seeking and providing abortion care. The court has vindicated our position by affirming that forcing a woman to carry an unwanted pregnancy to term or to seek out an unsafe abortion is a gross violation of her rights to privacy and bodily autonomy. Further, the continued restrictive abortion laws inhibit quality improvement possible to protect women with unintended pregnancies.” Center fact sheet: “The Impact of the Misalignment Between Kenya’s Constitution and the Penal Code on Access to Reproductive Health Care”

banner of CSW66
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| 26 March 2022

Statement on the outcome of Commission on the Status of Women (CSW 66)

For the first time, the Commission on the Status of Women (CSW) has adopted Agreed Conclusions on gender equality and the empowerment of all women and girls in the context of climate change, environmental and disaster risk reduction policies and programmes. IPPF has actively engaged in the process by providing technical inputs and raising awareness about the interlinkages between SRHR, climate change, gender equality and the empowerment and human rights of all women and girls.  IPPF welcomes CSW’s recognition that sexual and reproductive health and rights are critical to ensuring women’s resilience and adaptation to climate and humanitarian crises. As well as climate change is a gendered crisis and disproportionately affects women and girls in all their diversity while recognizing the importance of climate adaptation and resilience for women and girls in the context of climate change, environmental degradation and humanitarian crises.  Additionally, we welcome references to comprehensive sexuality education, multiple intersecting forms of discrimination, reslience and adaptation, access to justice and accountability of violations, and civil society organizations' meaningful participation, including feminist organizations and women human rights defenders.  Consensus reached at this year’s Commission reflects the broad based support of Member States to take gender-responsive action to address and tackle the climate crisis - a crisis that is happening now and requires immediate and urgent action.

banner of CSW66
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| 26 March 2022

Statement on the outcome of Commission on the Status of Women (CSW 66)

For the first time, the Commission on the Status of Women (CSW) has adopted Agreed Conclusions on gender equality and the empowerment of all women and girls in the context of climate change, environmental and disaster risk reduction policies and programmes. IPPF has actively engaged in the process by providing technical inputs and raising awareness about the interlinkages between SRHR, climate change, gender equality and the empowerment and human rights of all women and girls.  IPPF welcomes CSW’s recognition that sexual and reproductive health and rights are critical to ensuring women’s resilience and adaptation to climate and humanitarian crises. As well as climate change is a gendered crisis and disproportionately affects women and girls in all their diversity while recognizing the importance of climate adaptation and resilience for women and girls in the context of climate change, environmental degradation and humanitarian crises.  Additionally, we welcome references to comprehensive sexuality education, multiple intersecting forms of discrimination, reslience and adaptation, access to justice and accountability of violations, and civil society organizations' meaningful participation, including feminist organizations and women human rights defenders.  Consensus reached at this year’s Commission reflects the broad based support of Member States to take gender-responsive action to address and tackle the climate crisis - a crisis that is happening now and requires immediate and urgent action.

Opening of the IPPF Americas and the Caribbean Office, Bogotá Colombia March 14th 2022
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| 18 March 2022

IPPF Office in Bogota

We are overjoyed to announce the opening of the first of two locations of the International Planned Parenthood Federation -  Americas and the Caribbean Regional Office (ACRO), in Bogota, Colombia. IPPF Director-General Dr. Alvaro Bermejo, IPPF ACRO's Regional Director Eugenia López Uribe, Deputy Regional Director Dona Da Costa Martinez, and IPPF Director of External Relations Mina Barling were joined by team members from the ACRO and London Offices to reinforce the commitment to the fight for rights and access to sexual and reproductive services in the region. This is an especially exciting time as Colombia stands as the latest champion to step forward to protect the bodily autonomy of everyone with the possibility of gestation, with a recent Constitutional Court victory legalizing access to abortion until 24 weeks. The new IPPF Americas and the Caribbean Regional Office serves Member Associations and Collaborative Partners in over 24 countries across the region, and which are growing in their movement building and service delivery capabilities, including comprehensive sex education, provision of contraceptive, safe abortion, and maternal care and responding to humanitarian crisis. IPPF pride ourselves on being local through our members and global through our network. At the heart of our mission is the provision of – and advocacy in support of – integrated healthcare to anyone who needs it regardless of race, gender, sex, income, and crucially no matter how remote. Volunteerism is central to our healthcare delivery. It underpins the vital work of our members and their teams, whether through community outreach and distribution of contraceptive care or the regional Youth Action Movements championing change.  

Opening of the IPPF Americas and the Caribbean Office, Bogotá Colombia March 14th 2022
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| 17 March 2022

IPPF Office in Bogota

We are overjoyed to announce the opening of the first of two locations of the International Planned Parenthood Federation -  Americas and the Caribbean Regional Office (ACRO), in Bogota, Colombia. IPPF Director-General Dr. Alvaro Bermejo, IPPF ACRO's Regional Director Eugenia López Uribe, Deputy Regional Director Dona Da Costa Martinez, and IPPF Director of External Relations Mina Barling were joined by team members from the ACRO and London Offices to reinforce the commitment to the fight for rights and access to sexual and reproductive services in the region. This is an especially exciting time as Colombia stands as the latest champion to step forward to protect the bodily autonomy of everyone with the possibility of gestation, with a recent Constitutional Court victory legalizing access to abortion until 24 weeks. The new IPPF Americas and the Caribbean Regional Office serves Member Associations and Collaborative Partners in over 24 countries across the region, and which are growing in their movement building and service delivery capabilities, including comprehensive sex education, provision of contraceptive, safe abortion, and maternal care and responding to humanitarian crisis. IPPF pride ourselves on being local through our members and global through our network. At the heart of our mission is the provision of – and advocacy in support of – integrated healthcare to anyone who needs it regardless of race, gender, sex, income, and crucially no matter how remote. Volunteerism is central to our healthcare delivery. It underpins the vital work of our members and their teams, whether through community outreach and distribution of contraceptive care or the regional Youth Action Movements championing change.  

USAID logo
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| 30 March 2022

IPPF Part of Team Funded by USAID to Implement Global Health Equity Project

The International Planned Parenthood Federation has joined an international network to promote and sustain improved health and agency in low- and middle-income countries through Agency for All Project The U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) has funded a $38 million, five-year project led by the Center on Gender Equity and Health (GEH) at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Herbert Wertheim School of Public Health and Human Longevity Science. The project is an international, multi-institutional effort to understand and promote agency for individuals, communities and local organizations in low- and middle-income countries. “Agency for All” is intended to develop and foster social and behavioral research resulting in a better understanding of how to promote the voices of local people within their own communities and within health and development programming. It addresses multiple dimensions of health and well-being, including maternal and child health, infectious disease, HIV/AIDS, family planning and reproductive health. The program will work with diverse populations across the globe, with a focus on Africa and South Asia. GEH will coordinate the consortium of global, regional and local leaders to conduct research and implement solutions, informed by local priorities and agendas, said Rebecka Lundgren, PhD, an applied anthropologist and associate professor of infectious diseases and global public health, who will serve as project director.  “Agency for All will look at the complex questions of ‘agency,’ and what that means for different people, organizations and systems around the world, as well as for our own consortium partners,” said Lundgren. “We are honored to bring together a global consortium of world class researchers and implementers to discover what works to convert intention into action within social and behavior change programs and make it work for real people.” The initiative will concentrate on three geographical areas or hubs in East Africa, West Africa and South Asia, collaborating with specific organizations and networks in those regions. In addition to the International Planned Parenthood Federation, these partners include the Centre for Catalyzing Change (India), Evidence for Sustainable Human Development Systems in Africa (Cameroon), Makerere University (Uganda), Matchboxology (South Africa), Sambodhi (India), Shujaaz, Inc. (Kenya), University of Witwatersrand (South Africa), CORE Group, Promundo-US, Save the Children and Viamo. “These locally-led partnerships are critical,” said Paul Bukuluki, PhD, director of research for Agency for All and an associate professor at Makerere University. “We hope to develop context-specific mechanisms for measuring agency, and more effectively evaluate the approaches that help us improve the quality of life of women and men at the margins of society.” About the Center on Gender Equity and Health  The GEH conducts multidisciplinary research to understand and eliminate gender inequities, specifically in the areas of child marriage, unpaid labor, gender-based violence and gender social norms.  It is directed by Anita Raj, PhD, professor of infectious diseases and global public health in the UC San Diego School of Medicine. 

USAID logo
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| 15 March 2022

IPPF Part of Team Funded by USAID to Implement Global Health Equity Project

The International Planned Parenthood Federation has joined an international network to promote and sustain improved health and agency in low- and middle-income countries through Agency for All Project The U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) has funded a $38 million, five-year project led by the Center on Gender Equity and Health (GEH) at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Herbert Wertheim School of Public Health and Human Longevity Science. The project is an international, multi-institutional effort to understand and promote agency for individuals, communities and local organizations in low- and middle-income countries. “Agency for All” is intended to develop and foster social and behavioral research resulting in a better understanding of how to promote the voices of local people within their own communities and within health and development programming. It addresses multiple dimensions of health and well-being, including maternal and child health, infectious disease, HIV/AIDS, family planning and reproductive health. The program will work with diverse populations across the globe, with a focus on Africa and South Asia. GEH will coordinate the consortium of global, regional and local leaders to conduct research and implement solutions, informed by local priorities and agendas, said Rebecka Lundgren, PhD, an applied anthropologist and associate professor of infectious diseases and global public health, who will serve as project director.  “Agency for All will look at the complex questions of ‘agency,’ and what that means for different people, organizations and systems around the world, as well as for our own consortium partners,” said Lundgren. “We are honored to bring together a global consortium of world class researchers and implementers to discover what works to convert intention into action within social and behavior change programs and make it work for real people.” The initiative will concentrate on three geographical areas or hubs in East Africa, West Africa and South Asia, collaborating with specific organizations and networks in those regions. In addition to the International Planned Parenthood Federation, these partners include the Centre for Catalyzing Change (India), Evidence for Sustainable Human Development Systems in Africa (Cameroon), Makerere University (Uganda), Matchboxology (South Africa), Sambodhi (India), Shujaaz, Inc. (Kenya), University of Witwatersrand (South Africa), CORE Group, Promundo-US, Save the Children and Viamo. “These locally-led partnerships are critical,” said Paul Bukuluki, PhD, director of research for Agency for All and an associate professor at Makerere University. “We hope to develop context-specific mechanisms for measuring agency, and more effectively evaluate the approaches that help us improve the quality of life of women and men at the margins of society.” About the Center on Gender Equity and Health  The GEH conducts multidisciplinary research to understand and eliminate gender inequities, specifically in the areas of child marriage, unpaid labor, gender-based violence and gender social norms.  It is directed by Anita Raj, PhD, professor of infectious diseases and global public health in the UC San Diego School of Medicine.