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News

Latest news from IPPF

Spotlight

A selection of news from across the Federation

The Kenyan flag - black, red and green horizontal stripes with a shield in the middle

Kenya

News item

Kenyan High Court makes landmark ruling on safe abortion care

Kenyan High Court rules that safe abortion care is a fundamental right in a landmark verdict today that protects patients and healthcare providers from arbitrary arrests and prosecution.
IPPF has been recognized in the GIZ Gender Prize 2016 competition which promotes gender mainstreaming. 
news item

| 10 March 2016

IPPF recognized in the GIZ Gender Prize 2016

IPPF has been recognized in the GIZ Gender Prize 2016 competition which promotes gender mainstreaming.  Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ), a leading provider of international cooperation services for sustainable development, holds an annual internal Gender Competition to promote creativity and innovation for gender equality in their sustainable development work. GIZ’s global BACKUP Health programme won first prize for promoting gender equality within programmes funded by the Global Fund to fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. The collaborative ‘Shadows and Light’ project with IPPF was highlighted for its gender transformative approach to sexual and reproductive health (SRH) and HIV services for all, including women and girls, men and boys, and anyone perceived to be outside of the norms that constitute what are ‘feminine’ and ‘masculine’, including lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex people. Delivered by IPPF Member Associations in Cameroon, Kenya, India and Uganda, the three-year project focused on men who have sex with men, sex workers, people who inject drugs, and transgender people – populations at increased risk of HIV and other STIs – and set out to improve the linked sexual and reproductive health and HIV needs of these key populations. Alan Smith, IPPF’s Senior Advisor, HIV said: “I am very pleased that IPPF is recognised - with our partners GIZ - for this gender award linked to International Women’s Day, in particular for our innovative Shadows and Light project which focusses on the rights of key populations and challenges traditional gender norms.” Other winners included a renewable energies and energy efficiency programme in Mexico and a vocational training and sustainable development initiative in Ghana.  Eighty seven teams from 52 countries participated in the competition which covered the fields of governance, economic development and employment, environment, climate change and biodiversity, agriculture and rural development, energy, public finance, education and health.  

IPPF has been recognized in the GIZ Gender Prize 2016 competition which promotes gender mainstreaming. 
news_item

| 10 March 2016

IPPF recognized in the GIZ Gender Prize 2016

IPPF has been recognized in the GIZ Gender Prize 2016 competition which promotes gender mainstreaming.  Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ), a leading provider of international cooperation services for sustainable development, holds an annual internal Gender Competition to promote creativity and innovation for gender equality in their sustainable development work. GIZ’s global BACKUP Health programme won first prize for promoting gender equality within programmes funded by the Global Fund to fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. The collaborative ‘Shadows and Light’ project with IPPF was highlighted for its gender transformative approach to sexual and reproductive health (SRH) and HIV services for all, including women and girls, men and boys, and anyone perceived to be outside of the norms that constitute what are ‘feminine’ and ‘masculine’, including lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex people. Delivered by IPPF Member Associations in Cameroon, Kenya, India and Uganda, the three-year project focused on men who have sex with men, sex workers, people who inject drugs, and transgender people – populations at increased risk of HIV and other STIs – and set out to improve the linked sexual and reproductive health and HIV needs of these key populations. Alan Smith, IPPF’s Senior Advisor, HIV said: “I am very pleased that IPPF is recognised - with our partners GIZ - for this gender award linked to International Women’s Day, in particular for our innovative Shadows and Light project which focusses on the rights of key populations and challenges traditional gender norms.” Other winners included a renewable energies and energy efficiency programme in Mexico and a vocational training and sustainable development initiative in Ghana.  Eighty seven teams from 52 countries participated in the competition which covered the fields of governance, economic development and employment, environment, climate change and biodiversity, agriculture and rural development, energy, public finance, education and health.  

Jokaveti in front of her destroyed house
news item

| 26 February 2016

“I have never experienced such a strong cyclone in my 77 years of life.”

“I have never experienced such a strong cyclone in my 77 years of life.” Jokaveti Bavou lives in the village of Drauniivi, in the Fijian province of Ra. It was right in the path of Cyclone Winston, the strongest storm to ever strike the Southern Hemisphere. A week on from the disaster, Jokaveti, her son Jim and her grandchildren are safe. But there is no longer a roof on her house, and precious little left inside. In a village of 910 people, 75 houses were completed destroyed and about 65 damaged. Jokaveti was in her house with her grandchildren when Cyclone Winston arrived. “On Saturday night the winds started to increase. I told Jim that I was not sure of the house; I didn’t believe that it would be able to keep us safe. I told him that if the house started to collapse, we would run to his house for safety.” “The wind was getting stronger and when I looked at the back door, it had blown open. I took a hammer and nail to it. But when I got back to the other room, the main door had blown open and the wind was really strong. Then the wind took the roof off my house.”  “I told my granddaughter that everything was terrifying and we needed to go and hide somewhere. It was not safe to be in the house because of the flying debris.” “I got out and my son called out from his house and told us that we should go and hide underneath our house. He tried to come out of his house to save us, but the wind was so strong and roofing iron was flying around.” “I went underneath my house with my grandchildren holding a lamp and stayed there until the wind died. My son’s eyes never left us. Luckily for us a corrugated roofing iron flew and covered where we were hiding. I just cried and continued to thank God for keeping us safe.” “I could sense fear from all of us including my grandchildren. They were crying too. My son kept on calling to check on us until the wind died down.” Miraculously, no-one from Jokaveti’s family or the village was killed or seriously injured. IPPF is establishing centers in the Northern and Western parts of Fiji to provide medical services, especially those that deal with maternal and child health and sexual and reproductive health.  It is working closely with the Reproductive and Family Health Association of Fiji (IPPF’s member in Fiji), UNFPA Pacific, Empower Pacific, Fiji’s Ministry of Health and Medical Services. Donate now!  

Jokaveti in front of her destroyed house
news_item

| 26 February 2016

“I have never experienced such a strong cyclone in my 77 years of life.”

“I have never experienced such a strong cyclone in my 77 years of life.” Jokaveti Bavou lives in the village of Drauniivi, in the Fijian province of Ra. It was right in the path of Cyclone Winston, the strongest storm to ever strike the Southern Hemisphere. A week on from the disaster, Jokaveti, her son Jim and her grandchildren are safe. But there is no longer a roof on her house, and precious little left inside. In a village of 910 people, 75 houses were completed destroyed and about 65 damaged. Jokaveti was in her house with her grandchildren when Cyclone Winston arrived. “On Saturday night the winds started to increase. I told Jim that I was not sure of the house; I didn’t believe that it would be able to keep us safe. I told him that if the house started to collapse, we would run to his house for safety.” “The wind was getting stronger and when I looked at the back door, it had blown open. I took a hammer and nail to it. But when I got back to the other room, the main door had blown open and the wind was really strong. Then the wind took the roof off my house.”  “I told my granddaughter that everything was terrifying and we needed to go and hide somewhere. It was not safe to be in the house because of the flying debris.” “I got out and my son called out from his house and told us that we should go and hide underneath our house. He tried to come out of his house to save us, but the wind was so strong and roofing iron was flying around.” “I went underneath my house with my grandchildren holding a lamp and stayed there until the wind died. My son’s eyes never left us. Luckily for us a corrugated roofing iron flew and covered where we were hiding. I just cried and continued to thank God for keeping us safe.” “I could sense fear from all of us including my grandchildren. They were crying too. My son kept on calling to check on us until the wind died down.” Miraculously, no-one from Jokaveti’s family or the village was killed or seriously injured. IPPF is establishing centers in the Northern and Western parts of Fiji to provide medical services, especially those that deal with maternal and child health and sexual and reproductive health.  It is working closely with the Reproductive and Family Health Association of Fiji (IPPF’s member in Fiji), UNFPA Pacific, Empower Pacific, Fiji’s Ministry of Health and Medical Services. Donate now!  

mother and child
news item

| 04 February 2016

A matter of life and death: IPPF's humanitarian response

Today, the Danish Family Planning Association (DFPA) together with the Danish All-Party Parliamentary Group (APPG) on Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights, and the Danish Ministry of Foreign Affairs convened a conference with the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) on the challenges of sexual and reproductive health and  rights (SRHR) in humanitarian crises. HRH the Crown Princess of Denmark and the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) were also in attendance. HKHK Mary: women are not vulnerable in hum crises because they are weak but because they lack equality #SRHRinCrises pic.twitter.com/EOhV38IpBi — Mette Gjerskov (@MetteGjerskov) February 4, 2016 More than 100 million people are in need of humanitarian assistance. It is estimated that 26 million are women and adolescent girls of reproductive age of which 500 die every day from complications related to  pregnancy and childbirths. For example, the Syrian civil war has resulted in a 39% rise in maternal mortality since 2010 and gender-based violence is affecting at least 7 out of 10 women in some crisis settings. This shows a great need for humanitarian actors to ensure that the human rights of women and girls are protected and able to access sexual and reproductive healthcare.   // IPPF: saving lives in crises Right now more than 250,000 women and girls need help. IPPF provides the emergency response needed, like family planning, which can reduce maternal deaths by 33%. SEXUAL & REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH SERVICES SAVES LIVES. AND IS A HUMAN RIGHT. Posted by IPPF on Thursday, 4 February 2016 The increasing number of humanitarian crises calls for serious rethinking of the current humanitarian response. The status of sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) violations in humanitarian crises must be confronted and prevented. Over the past decade, IPPF has reached millions of people during floods, conflicts, earthquakes, cyclones when health care often collapsed, IPPF Member Associations continued to serve the unreachable particularly women which make three quarters of IPPF clients. We have an organizational strategy to address sexual and reproductive needs before, during and after humanitarian crises.  IPPF starts with its Minimum Initial Service Package, which is life-saving, and transition to its Integrated Package of Essential services, which is life-changing. This ensure that a sxual and reproductive health situation is better after the crisis than before. @LcrTrc Crown Princess & @ippf CEO champion #women's #health & #rights in #humanitarian crisis settings pic.twitter.com/4ajLr0rkXg — Matthew Lindley (@t__box) February 4, 2016 Director general, Tewodros Melesse said, "Access to these services,especially in the midst of war or natural disaster, is a human right which does not only saves lives in the short run, but also helps build resilience amongst refugees and displaced people. It’s one of the most important aspects of humanitarian assistance that is often forgotten when disaster and conflicts strike."

mother and child
news_item

| 04 February 2016

A matter of life and death: IPPF's humanitarian response

Today, the Danish Family Planning Association (DFPA) together with the Danish All-Party Parliamentary Group (APPG) on Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights, and the Danish Ministry of Foreign Affairs convened a conference with the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) on the challenges of sexual and reproductive health and  rights (SRHR) in humanitarian crises. HRH the Crown Princess of Denmark and the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) were also in attendance. HKHK Mary: women are not vulnerable in hum crises because they are weak but because they lack equality #SRHRinCrises pic.twitter.com/EOhV38IpBi — Mette Gjerskov (@MetteGjerskov) February 4, 2016 More than 100 million people are in need of humanitarian assistance. It is estimated that 26 million are women and adolescent girls of reproductive age of which 500 die every day from complications related to  pregnancy and childbirths. For example, the Syrian civil war has resulted in a 39% rise in maternal mortality since 2010 and gender-based violence is affecting at least 7 out of 10 women in some crisis settings. This shows a great need for humanitarian actors to ensure that the human rights of women and girls are protected and able to access sexual and reproductive healthcare.   // IPPF: saving lives in crises Right now more than 250,000 women and girls need help. IPPF provides the emergency response needed, like family planning, which can reduce maternal deaths by 33%. SEXUAL & REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH SERVICES SAVES LIVES. AND IS A HUMAN RIGHT. Posted by IPPF on Thursday, 4 February 2016 The increasing number of humanitarian crises calls for serious rethinking of the current humanitarian response. The status of sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) violations in humanitarian crises must be confronted and prevented. Over the past decade, IPPF has reached millions of people during floods, conflicts, earthquakes, cyclones when health care often collapsed, IPPF Member Associations continued to serve the unreachable particularly women which make three quarters of IPPF clients. We have an organizational strategy to address sexual and reproductive needs before, during and after humanitarian crises.  IPPF starts with its Minimum Initial Service Package, which is life-saving, and transition to its Integrated Package of Essential services, which is life-changing. This ensure that a sxual and reproductive health situation is better after the crisis than before. @LcrTrc Crown Princess & @ippf CEO champion #women's #health & #rights in #humanitarian crisis settings pic.twitter.com/4ajLr0rkXg — Matthew Lindley (@t__box) February 4, 2016 Director general, Tewodros Melesse said, "Access to these services,especially in the midst of war or natural disaster, is a human right which does not only saves lives in the short run, but also helps build resilience amongst refugees and displaced people. It’s one of the most important aspects of humanitarian assistance that is often forgotten when disaster and conflicts strike."

IPPF's pledged to serve 60million more women
news item

| 28 January 2016

Pledging to reach new contraceptive users: Turning Family Planning into Future Planning for 60 Million Women

The International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) announced its most ambitious pledge ever: to realize the human rights of a further 60 million women to choose freely the size of their families. The pledge was unveiled as IPPF's global contribution to the Family Planning 2020 goal at the International Family Planning Conference in Indonesia today.     IPPF is committed to working with Family Planning 2020 and the global family planning community to reach the goal of ensuring 120 million additional women have access to family planning by 2020. The Federation, with the world's largest non-governmental family planning service delivery network, has driven its own performance since the London Summit reaching 15 million new users of modern family planning. IPPF is now upwardly revised its pledged contribution towards the global FP2020 goal. Thank you to @ippf for pledge to serve 60M NEW users of contraception to meet #FP2020 goals! #ICFP — Family Planning 2020 (@FP2020Global) January 28, 2016 Tewodros Melesse, IPPF Director General, announcing the pledge, said “This is not a game of numbers. For us, it's very simple, it can only be about putting women at the front and centre of what we do. I'm delighted by what we have achieved and that we can make this significant and increased contribution through this pledge. Since 2012, IPPF's total reported client numbers increased by nearly 40 per cent. This was achieved by expanding our client base, not by changing who we serve. We have raised investment in family planning and improved our overall performance." Building on this success, IPPF has set an even more ambitious target for new users to contraception. Between 2015 and 2020 IPPF pledges to reach a further 45 million new users in the FP2020 focus countries. This will mean that IPPF will serve a total of 60 million new users between 2012 and 2020, a major contribution towards the FP2020 goal. Dr. Ariel Pablos-Méndez, Assistant Administrator for Global Health and Child and Maternal Survival Coordinator, Global Health Bureau, USAID said on IPPF's announcement,'Community driven approaches increase access for new users to family planning. When offered alongside a basket of primary health services - like those provided by IPPF - poor, young and rural women and men can get the voluntary family planning and other health programs that focus on their needs. This client-focused approach will get us another step closer to our FP 2020 goals and ultimately universal health coverage." “FP2020 congratulates IPPF on this ambitious renewed commitment to advancing the rights of women and girls around the world to decide for themselves when and how many children to have,” said Beth Schlachter, FP2020 Executive Director. “IPPF has been a leader in providing modern contraception to women and girls for decades, and as key partners in the global FP2020 movement they are helping ensure that family planning remains a central part of the global development agenda as we work towards achieving the Sustainable Development Goals and universal access.” IPPF is on target to achieve our goal of doubling the number of services provided by 2015. This is a milestone towards the Federation's commitment to treble the number of its high-impact life-saving and changing sexual and reproductive health services provided by 2020. Between 2012 and 2014, IPPF achieved a significant increase in access for new users of modern contraception. In 59 of the 69 FP2020 focus countries where IPPF is operational, the Federation provided family planning services to 15 million new users in just three years. Our Strategic Framework which started in January 2016, renews and strengthens its commitment to support the rights of women and girls to decide freely whether, when and how many children to have. IPPF will deliver high impact, quality, rights-based, integrated sexual and reproductive health services, including packages that address family planning, safe abortion, prenatal care, STIs/HIV, sexual and gender-based violence and cervical cancer. IPPF will optimize the number of people it can serve by increasing operational effectiveness, expanding provision in humanitarian emergencies and increasing national and global income to provide the increased services. The Federation will also enable the provision of services by other public and private health providers.

IPPF's pledged to serve 60million more women
news_item

| 28 January 2016

Pledging to reach new contraceptive users: Turning Family Planning into Future Planning for 60 Million Women

The International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) announced its most ambitious pledge ever: to realize the human rights of a further 60 million women to choose freely the size of their families. The pledge was unveiled as IPPF's global contribution to the Family Planning 2020 goal at the International Family Planning Conference in Indonesia today.     IPPF is committed to working with Family Planning 2020 and the global family planning community to reach the goal of ensuring 120 million additional women have access to family planning by 2020. The Federation, with the world's largest non-governmental family planning service delivery network, has driven its own performance since the London Summit reaching 15 million new users of modern family planning. IPPF is now upwardly revised its pledged contribution towards the global FP2020 goal. Thank you to @ippf for pledge to serve 60M NEW users of contraception to meet #FP2020 goals! #ICFP — Family Planning 2020 (@FP2020Global) January 28, 2016 Tewodros Melesse, IPPF Director General, announcing the pledge, said “This is not a game of numbers. For us, it's very simple, it can only be about putting women at the front and centre of what we do. I'm delighted by what we have achieved and that we can make this significant and increased contribution through this pledge. Since 2012, IPPF's total reported client numbers increased by nearly 40 per cent. This was achieved by expanding our client base, not by changing who we serve. We have raised investment in family planning and improved our overall performance." Building on this success, IPPF has set an even more ambitious target for new users to contraception. Between 2015 and 2020 IPPF pledges to reach a further 45 million new users in the FP2020 focus countries. This will mean that IPPF will serve a total of 60 million new users between 2012 and 2020, a major contribution towards the FP2020 goal. Dr. Ariel Pablos-Méndez, Assistant Administrator for Global Health and Child and Maternal Survival Coordinator, Global Health Bureau, USAID said on IPPF's announcement,'Community driven approaches increase access for new users to family planning. When offered alongside a basket of primary health services - like those provided by IPPF - poor, young and rural women and men can get the voluntary family planning and other health programs that focus on their needs. This client-focused approach will get us another step closer to our FP 2020 goals and ultimately universal health coverage." “FP2020 congratulates IPPF on this ambitious renewed commitment to advancing the rights of women and girls around the world to decide for themselves when and how many children to have,” said Beth Schlachter, FP2020 Executive Director. “IPPF has been a leader in providing modern contraception to women and girls for decades, and as key partners in the global FP2020 movement they are helping ensure that family planning remains a central part of the global development agenda as we work towards achieving the Sustainable Development Goals and universal access.” IPPF is on target to achieve our goal of doubling the number of services provided by 2015. This is a milestone towards the Federation's commitment to treble the number of its high-impact life-saving and changing sexual and reproductive health services provided by 2020. Between 2012 and 2014, IPPF achieved a significant increase in access for new users of modern contraception. In 59 of the 69 FP2020 focus countries where IPPF is operational, the Federation provided family planning services to 15 million new users in just three years. Our Strategic Framework which started in January 2016, renews and strengthens its commitment to support the rights of women and girls to decide freely whether, when and how many children to have. IPPF will deliver high impact, quality, rights-based, integrated sexual and reproductive health services, including packages that address family planning, safe abortion, prenatal care, STIs/HIV, sexual and gender-based violence and cervical cancer. IPPF will optimize the number of people it can serve by increasing operational effectiveness, expanding provision in humanitarian emergencies and increasing national and global income to provide the increased services. The Federation will also enable the provision of services by other public and private health providers.

An digital billboard in Times Square reading: "I decide the size of my family"
news item

| 17 August 2016

Thousands sign up to support sexual health

A 410,000–strong petition has been handed to the United Nations calling for women and girls to be put at the heart of the world’s next poverty reduction targets. The I Decide petition, which was started by the International Planned Parenthood Federation, aimed to ensure that sexual and reproductive health and rights were a central focus of the Sustainable Development Goals being decided this month (SDGs). People from 151 countries around the world signed the petition which has been handed to the United Nations Secretary General, Ban Ki-Moon. In a letter to Mr Ban, the Director-General of IPPF Tewodros Melesse, said: “IPPF has gathered the hopes of women, men and young people -gathered from around the world – who have called for the ability to decide on their own futures, including what happens to their bodies, who they share their life with and the size of their families. “They expressed their support for sexual and reproductive health and rights to be at the heart of the new development framework and we are grateful for your support in ensuring this is the case,” he added.  

An digital billboard in Times Square reading: "I decide the size of my family"
news_item

| 29 September 2015

Thousands sign up to support sexual health

A 410,000–strong petition has been handed to the United Nations calling for women and girls to be put at the heart of the world’s next poverty reduction targets. The I Decide petition, which was started by the International Planned Parenthood Federation, aimed to ensure that sexual and reproductive health and rights were a central focus of the Sustainable Development Goals being decided this month (SDGs). People from 151 countries around the world signed the petition which has been handed to the United Nations Secretary General, Ban Ki-Moon. In a letter to Mr Ban, the Director-General of IPPF Tewodros Melesse, said: “IPPF has gathered the hopes of women, men and young people -gathered from around the world – who have called for the ability to decide on their own futures, including what happens to their bodies, who they share their life with and the size of their families. “They expressed their support for sexual and reproductive health and rights to be at the heart of the new development framework and we are grateful for your support in ensuring this is the case,” he added.  

mother and child
news item

| 03 August 2015

A win for women and girls; Now words must become action

The governments of the world have committed to making sure that every girl and woman can live free from discrimination and have access to sexual and reproductive health and reproductive rights within one generation. When implemented, this agenda will save millions of lives. On Sunday, August 3rd, with the conclusion of the final Intergovernmental Negotiations for the post-2015 development framework, governments have finalized the new development framework “Transforming Our World: The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development”. It is expected that this final agreement will be formally adopted at the United Nations Summit on the post-2015 development agenda on September 25 to 27, 2015. But although it represents a big leap forward, the words must become action. Tewodros Melesse, Director General of IPPF said: “Today we welcome the commitment that governments are making to put women and girls first, including realising their sexual and reproductive health and reproductive rights. If we want this new agenda to change lives – and save lives – it must become a reality on the ground. We are calling on all governments to implement this agenda and ensure that there is adequate funding for sexual and reproductive health and rights and to make the ambition of this agenda a reality.” This Agenda is a win for women and girls. It makes a commitment to ending poverty and protecting the health of the planet, as well as setting out an ambitious agenda for gender equality and women’s empowerment. The goals and targets require every country to take measures to reduce maternal mortality, end HIV, eliminate violence against women and harmful traditional practices, and ensure that everyone has access to Universal Health Coverage,  access to sexual and reproductive health care services and the fulfilment of their reproductive rights. It will ensure that the 225 million women who want to, but cannot, access modern contraception will be able to finally make decisions about their families, their bodies and their futures.  It will help end early and forced marriage, which currently sees 15 million girls married before their 18th birthdays every year. We also welcome the reaffirmation of the Programme of Action of the International Conference on Population and Development, the Beijing Platform for Action; and the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development (“Rio+ 20”), including their follow-up conferences, as these are foundational documents upon which the agenda is built.  The Universal Declaration of Human Rights is also specifically mentioned as the basis of the new agenda, which further strengthens its people-centered focus. However, the new Agenda fails to define specific accountability mechanisms to promote the full implementation of the agenda and to provide citizens with the tools to hold governments to account for their actions. It is also disappointing that the essential role of civil society participation in planning, implementation and accountability was not stronger. IPPF also called for the inclusion of sexual rights in the final document, however the specific wins in the final 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development that IPPF successfully advocated for include: A standalone goal on gender equality and the empowerment of women and girls, including specific targets on eliminating discrimination and violence against women and girls, and ending early and forced marriage and female genital mutilation. This goal also contains a target on ensuring universal access to sexual and reproductive health and reproductive rights as agreed in accordance with the Programme of Action of the International Conference on Population and Development and the Beijing Platform for Action and the outcome documents of their review conferences. A standalone goal on ensuring healthy lives and promoting well-being. This contains a commitment to ensuring universal access to sexual and reproductive health care services, including for family planning, information and education, and the integration of reproductive health into national strategies and programmes, as well as reducing the global maternal mortality ratio to less than 70 per 100,000 live births, and ending the epidemic of HIV. A Declaration that emphasized the importance of gender equality and the empowerment of women and girls as a crucial contribution to progress across all goals and targets. It also emphasized the fundamental role of human rights and the responsibility of States to work to realize human rights for all. 

mother and child
news_item

| 03 August 2015

A win for women and girls; Now words must become action

The governments of the world have committed to making sure that every girl and woman can live free from discrimination and have access to sexual and reproductive health and reproductive rights within one generation. When implemented, this agenda will save millions of lives. On Sunday, August 3rd, with the conclusion of the final Intergovernmental Negotiations for the post-2015 development framework, governments have finalized the new development framework “Transforming Our World: The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development”. It is expected that this final agreement will be formally adopted at the United Nations Summit on the post-2015 development agenda on September 25 to 27, 2015. But although it represents a big leap forward, the words must become action. Tewodros Melesse, Director General of IPPF said: “Today we welcome the commitment that governments are making to put women and girls first, including realising their sexual and reproductive health and reproductive rights. If we want this new agenda to change lives – and save lives – it must become a reality on the ground. We are calling on all governments to implement this agenda and ensure that there is adequate funding for sexual and reproductive health and rights and to make the ambition of this agenda a reality.” This Agenda is a win for women and girls. It makes a commitment to ending poverty and protecting the health of the planet, as well as setting out an ambitious agenda for gender equality and women’s empowerment. The goals and targets require every country to take measures to reduce maternal mortality, end HIV, eliminate violence against women and harmful traditional practices, and ensure that everyone has access to Universal Health Coverage,  access to sexual and reproductive health care services and the fulfilment of their reproductive rights. It will ensure that the 225 million women who want to, but cannot, access modern contraception will be able to finally make decisions about their families, their bodies and their futures.  It will help end early and forced marriage, which currently sees 15 million girls married before their 18th birthdays every year. We also welcome the reaffirmation of the Programme of Action of the International Conference on Population and Development, the Beijing Platform for Action; and the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development (“Rio+ 20”), including their follow-up conferences, as these are foundational documents upon which the agenda is built.  The Universal Declaration of Human Rights is also specifically mentioned as the basis of the new agenda, which further strengthens its people-centered focus. However, the new Agenda fails to define specific accountability mechanisms to promote the full implementation of the agenda and to provide citizens with the tools to hold governments to account for their actions. It is also disappointing that the essential role of civil society participation in planning, implementation and accountability was not stronger. IPPF also called for the inclusion of sexual rights in the final document, however the specific wins in the final 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development that IPPF successfully advocated for include: A standalone goal on gender equality and the empowerment of women and girls, including specific targets on eliminating discrimination and violence against women and girls, and ending early and forced marriage and female genital mutilation. This goal also contains a target on ensuring universal access to sexual and reproductive health and reproductive rights as agreed in accordance with the Programme of Action of the International Conference on Population and Development and the Beijing Platform for Action and the outcome documents of their review conferences. A standalone goal on ensuring healthy lives and promoting well-being. This contains a commitment to ensuring universal access to sexual and reproductive health care services, including for family planning, information and education, and the integration of reproductive health into national strategies and programmes, as well as reducing the global maternal mortality ratio to less than 70 per 100,000 live births, and ending the epidemic of HIV. A Declaration that emphasized the importance of gender equality and the empowerment of women and girls as a crucial contribution to progress across all goals and targets. It also emphasized the fundamental role of human rights and the responsibility of States to work to realize human rights for all. 

IPPF has been recognized in the GIZ Gender Prize 2016 competition which promotes gender mainstreaming. 
news item

| 10 March 2016

IPPF recognized in the GIZ Gender Prize 2016

IPPF has been recognized in the GIZ Gender Prize 2016 competition which promotes gender mainstreaming.  Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ), a leading provider of international cooperation services for sustainable development, holds an annual internal Gender Competition to promote creativity and innovation for gender equality in their sustainable development work. GIZ’s global BACKUP Health programme won first prize for promoting gender equality within programmes funded by the Global Fund to fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. The collaborative ‘Shadows and Light’ project with IPPF was highlighted for its gender transformative approach to sexual and reproductive health (SRH) and HIV services for all, including women and girls, men and boys, and anyone perceived to be outside of the norms that constitute what are ‘feminine’ and ‘masculine’, including lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex people. Delivered by IPPF Member Associations in Cameroon, Kenya, India and Uganda, the three-year project focused on men who have sex with men, sex workers, people who inject drugs, and transgender people – populations at increased risk of HIV and other STIs – and set out to improve the linked sexual and reproductive health and HIV needs of these key populations. Alan Smith, IPPF’s Senior Advisor, HIV said: “I am very pleased that IPPF is recognised - with our partners GIZ - for this gender award linked to International Women’s Day, in particular for our innovative Shadows and Light project which focusses on the rights of key populations and challenges traditional gender norms.” Other winners included a renewable energies and energy efficiency programme in Mexico and a vocational training and sustainable development initiative in Ghana.  Eighty seven teams from 52 countries participated in the competition which covered the fields of governance, economic development and employment, environment, climate change and biodiversity, agriculture and rural development, energy, public finance, education and health.  

IPPF has been recognized in the GIZ Gender Prize 2016 competition which promotes gender mainstreaming. 
news_item

| 10 March 2016

IPPF recognized in the GIZ Gender Prize 2016

IPPF has been recognized in the GIZ Gender Prize 2016 competition which promotes gender mainstreaming.  Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ), a leading provider of international cooperation services for sustainable development, holds an annual internal Gender Competition to promote creativity and innovation for gender equality in their sustainable development work. GIZ’s global BACKUP Health programme won first prize for promoting gender equality within programmes funded by the Global Fund to fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. The collaborative ‘Shadows and Light’ project with IPPF was highlighted for its gender transformative approach to sexual and reproductive health (SRH) and HIV services for all, including women and girls, men and boys, and anyone perceived to be outside of the norms that constitute what are ‘feminine’ and ‘masculine’, including lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex people. Delivered by IPPF Member Associations in Cameroon, Kenya, India and Uganda, the three-year project focused on men who have sex with men, sex workers, people who inject drugs, and transgender people – populations at increased risk of HIV and other STIs – and set out to improve the linked sexual and reproductive health and HIV needs of these key populations. Alan Smith, IPPF’s Senior Advisor, HIV said: “I am very pleased that IPPF is recognised - with our partners GIZ - for this gender award linked to International Women’s Day, in particular for our innovative Shadows and Light project which focusses on the rights of key populations and challenges traditional gender norms.” Other winners included a renewable energies and energy efficiency programme in Mexico and a vocational training and sustainable development initiative in Ghana.  Eighty seven teams from 52 countries participated in the competition which covered the fields of governance, economic development and employment, environment, climate change and biodiversity, agriculture and rural development, energy, public finance, education and health.  

Jokaveti in front of her destroyed house
news item

| 26 February 2016

“I have never experienced such a strong cyclone in my 77 years of life.”

“I have never experienced such a strong cyclone in my 77 years of life.” Jokaveti Bavou lives in the village of Drauniivi, in the Fijian province of Ra. It was right in the path of Cyclone Winston, the strongest storm to ever strike the Southern Hemisphere. A week on from the disaster, Jokaveti, her son Jim and her grandchildren are safe. But there is no longer a roof on her house, and precious little left inside. In a village of 910 people, 75 houses were completed destroyed and about 65 damaged. Jokaveti was in her house with her grandchildren when Cyclone Winston arrived. “On Saturday night the winds started to increase. I told Jim that I was not sure of the house; I didn’t believe that it would be able to keep us safe. I told him that if the house started to collapse, we would run to his house for safety.” “The wind was getting stronger and when I looked at the back door, it had blown open. I took a hammer and nail to it. But when I got back to the other room, the main door had blown open and the wind was really strong. Then the wind took the roof off my house.”  “I told my granddaughter that everything was terrifying and we needed to go and hide somewhere. It was not safe to be in the house because of the flying debris.” “I got out and my son called out from his house and told us that we should go and hide underneath our house. He tried to come out of his house to save us, but the wind was so strong and roofing iron was flying around.” “I went underneath my house with my grandchildren holding a lamp and stayed there until the wind died. My son’s eyes never left us. Luckily for us a corrugated roofing iron flew and covered where we were hiding. I just cried and continued to thank God for keeping us safe.” “I could sense fear from all of us including my grandchildren. They were crying too. My son kept on calling to check on us until the wind died down.” Miraculously, no-one from Jokaveti’s family or the village was killed or seriously injured. IPPF is establishing centers in the Northern and Western parts of Fiji to provide medical services, especially those that deal with maternal and child health and sexual and reproductive health.  It is working closely with the Reproductive and Family Health Association of Fiji (IPPF’s member in Fiji), UNFPA Pacific, Empower Pacific, Fiji’s Ministry of Health and Medical Services. Donate now!  

Jokaveti in front of her destroyed house
news_item

| 26 February 2016

“I have never experienced such a strong cyclone in my 77 years of life.”

“I have never experienced such a strong cyclone in my 77 years of life.” Jokaveti Bavou lives in the village of Drauniivi, in the Fijian province of Ra. It was right in the path of Cyclone Winston, the strongest storm to ever strike the Southern Hemisphere. A week on from the disaster, Jokaveti, her son Jim and her grandchildren are safe. But there is no longer a roof on her house, and precious little left inside. In a village of 910 people, 75 houses were completed destroyed and about 65 damaged. Jokaveti was in her house with her grandchildren when Cyclone Winston arrived. “On Saturday night the winds started to increase. I told Jim that I was not sure of the house; I didn’t believe that it would be able to keep us safe. I told him that if the house started to collapse, we would run to his house for safety.” “The wind was getting stronger and when I looked at the back door, it had blown open. I took a hammer and nail to it. But when I got back to the other room, the main door had blown open and the wind was really strong. Then the wind took the roof off my house.”  “I told my granddaughter that everything was terrifying and we needed to go and hide somewhere. It was not safe to be in the house because of the flying debris.” “I got out and my son called out from his house and told us that we should go and hide underneath our house. He tried to come out of his house to save us, but the wind was so strong and roofing iron was flying around.” “I went underneath my house with my grandchildren holding a lamp and stayed there until the wind died. My son’s eyes never left us. Luckily for us a corrugated roofing iron flew and covered where we were hiding. I just cried and continued to thank God for keeping us safe.” “I could sense fear from all of us including my grandchildren. They were crying too. My son kept on calling to check on us until the wind died down.” Miraculously, no-one from Jokaveti’s family or the village was killed or seriously injured. IPPF is establishing centers in the Northern and Western parts of Fiji to provide medical services, especially those that deal with maternal and child health and sexual and reproductive health.  It is working closely with the Reproductive and Family Health Association of Fiji (IPPF’s member in Fiji), UNFPA Pacific, Empower Pacific, Fiji’s Ministry of Health and Medical Services. Donate now!  

mother and child
news item

| 04 February 2016

A matter of life and death: IPPF's humanitarian response

Today, the Danish Family Planning Association (DFPA) together with the Danish All-Party Parliamentary Group (APPG) on Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights, and the Danish Ministry of Foreign Affairs convened a conference with the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) on the challenges of sexual and reproductive health and  rights (SRHR) in humanitarian crises. HRH the Crown Princess of Denmark and the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) were also in attendance. HKHK Mary: women are not vulnerable in hum crises because they are weak but because they lack equality #SRHRinCrises pic.twitter.com/EOhV38IpBi — Mette Gjerskov (@MetteGjerskov) February 4, 2016 More than 100 million people are in need of humanitarian assistance. It is estimated that 26 million are women and adolescent girls of reproductive age of which 500 die every day from complications related to  pregnancy and childbirths. For example, the Syrian civil war has resulted in a 39% rise in maternal mortality since 2010 and gender-based violence is affecting at least 7 out of 10 women in some crisis settings. This shows a great need for humanitarian actors to ensure that the human rights of women and girls are protected and able to access sexual and reproductive healthcare.   // IPPF: saving lives in crises Right now more than 250,000 women and girls need help. IPPF provides the emergency response needed, like family planning, which can reduce maternal deaths by 33%. SEXUAL & REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH SERVICES SAVES LIVES. AND IS A HUMAN RIGHT. Posted by IPPF on Thursday, 4 February 2016 The increasing number of humanitarian crises calls for serious rethinking of the current humanitarian response. The status of sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) violations in humanitarian crises must be confronted and prevented. Over the past decade, IPPF has reached millions of people during floods, conflicts, earthquakes, cyclones when health care often collapsed, IPPF Member Associations continued to serve the unreachable particularly women which make three quarters of IPPF clients. We have an organizational strategy to address sexual and reproductive needs before, during and after humanitarian crises.  IPPF starts with its Minimum Initial Service Package, which is life-saving, and transition to its Integrated Package of Essential services, which is life-changing. This ensure that a sxual and reproductive health situation is better after the crisis than before. @LcrTrc Crown Princess & @ippf CEO champion #women's #health & #rights in #humanitarian crisis settings pic.twitter.com/4ajLr0rkXg — Matthew Lindley (@t__box) February 4, 2016 Director general, Tewodros Melesse said, "Access to these services,especially in the midst of war or natural disaster, is a human right which does not only saves lives in the short run, but also helps build resilience amongst refugees and displaced people. It’s one of the most important aspects of humanitarian assistance that is often forgotten when disaster and conflicts strike."

mother and child
news_item

| 04 February 2016

A matter of life and death: IPPF's humanitarian response

Today, the Danish Family Planning Association (DFPA) together with the Danish All-Party Parliamentary Group (APPG) on Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights, and the Danish Ministry of Foreign Affairs convened a conference with the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) on the challenges of sexual and reproductive health and  rights (SRHR) in humanitarian crises. HRH the Crown Princess of Denmark and the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) were also in attendance. HKHK Mary: women are not vulnerable in hum crises because they are weak but because they lack equality #SRHRinCrises pic.twitter.com/EOhV38IpBi — Mette Gjerskov (@MetteGjerskov) February 4, 2016 More than 100 million people are in need of humanitarian assistance. It is estimated that 26 million are women and adolescent girls of reproductive age of which 500 die every day from complications related to  pregnancy and childbirths. For example, the Syrian civil war has resulted in a 39% rise in maternal mortality since 2010 and gender-based violence is affecting at least 7 out of 10 women in some crisis settings. This shows a great need for humanitarian actors to ensure that the human rights of women and girls are protected and able to access sexual and reproductive healthcare.   // IPPF: saving lives in crises Right now more than 250,000 women and girls need help. IPPF provides the emergency response needed, like family planning, which can reduce maternal deaths by 33%. SEXUAL & REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH SERVICES SAVES LIVES. AND IS A HUMAN RIGHT. Posted by IPPF on Thursday, 4 February 2016 The increasing number of humanitarian crises calls for serious rethinking of the current humanitarian response. The status of sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) violations in humanitarian crises must be confronted and prevented. Over the past decade, IPPF has reached millions of people during floods, conflicts, earthquakes, cyclones when health care often collapsed, IPPF Member Associations continued to serve the unreachable particularly women which make three quarters of IPPF clients. We have an organizational strategy to address sexual and reproductive needs before, during and after humanitarian crises.  IPPF starts with its Minimum Initial Service Package, which is life-saving, and transition to its Integrated Package of Essential services, which is life-changing. This ensure that a sxual and reproductive health situation is better after the crisis than before. @LcrTrc Crown Princess & @ippf CEO champion #women's #health & #rights in #humanitarian crisis settings pic.twitter.com/4ajLr0rkXg — Matthew Lindley (@t__box) February 4, 2016 Director general, Tewodros Melesse said, "Access to these services,especially in the midst of war or natural disaster, is a human right which does not only saves lives in the short run, but also helps build resilience amongst refugees and displaced people. It’s one of the most important aspects of humanitarian assistance that is often forgotten when disaster and conflicts strike."

IPPF's pledged to serve 60million more women
news item

| 28 January 2016

Pledging to reach new contraceptive users: Turning Family Planning into Future Planning for 60 Million Women

The International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) announced its most ambitious pledge ever: to realize the human rights of a further 60 million women to choose freely the size of their families. The pledge was unveiled as IPPF's global contribution to the Family Planning 2020 goal at the International Family Planning Conference in Indonesia today.     IPPF is committed to working with Family Planning 2020 and the global family planning community to reach the goal of ensuring 120 million additional women have access to family planning by 2020. The Federation, with the world's largest non-governmental family planning service delivery network, has driven its own performance since the London Summit reaching 15 million new users of modern family planning. IPPF is now upwardly revised its pledged contribution towards the global FP2020 goal. Thank you to @ippf for pledge to serve 60M NEW users of contraception to meet #FP2020 goals! #ICFP — Family Planning 2020 (@FP2020Global) January 28, 2016 Tewodros Melesse, IPPF Director General, announcing the pledge, said “This is not a game of numbers. For us, it's very simple, it can only be about putting women at the front and centre of what we do. I'm delighted by what we have achieved and that we can make this significant and increased contribution through this pledge. Since 2012, IPPF's total reported client numbers increased by nearly 40 per cent. This was achieved by expanding our client base, not by changing who we serve. We have raised investment in family planning and improved our overall performance." Building on this success, IPPF has set an even more ambitious target for new users to contraception. Between 2015 and 2020 IPPF pledges to reach a further 45 million new users in the FP2020 focus countries. This will mean that IPPF will serve a total of 60 million new users between 2012 and 2020, a major contribution towards the FP2020 goal. Dr. Ariel Pablos-Méndez, Assistant Administrator for Global Health and Child and Maternal Survival Coordinator, Global Health Bureau, USAID said on IPPF's announcement,'Community driven approaches increase access for new users to family planning. When offered alongside a basket of primary health services - like those provided by IPPF - poor, young and rural women and men can get the voluntary family planning and other health programs that focus on their needs. This client-focused approach will get us another step closer to our FP 2020 goals and ultimately universal health coverage." “FP2020 congratulates IPPF on this ambitious renewed commitment to advancing the rights of women and girls around the world to decide for themselves when and how many children to have,” said Beth Schlachter, FP2020 Executive Director. “IPPF has been a leader in providing modern contraception to women and girls for decades, and as key partners in the global FP2020 movement they are helping ensure that family planning remains a central part of the global development agenda as we work towards achieving the Sustainable Development Goals and universal access.” IPPF is on target to achieve our goal of doubling the number of services provided by 2015. This is a milestone towards the Federation's commitment to treble the number of its high-impact life-saving and changing sexual and reproductive health services provided by 2020. Between 2012 and 2014, IPPF achieved a significant increase in access for new users of modern contraception. In 59 of the 69 FP2020 focus countries where IPPF is operational, the Federation provided family planning services to 15 million new users in just three years. Our Strategic Framework which started in January 2016, renews and strengthens its commitment to support the rights of women and girls to decide freely whether, when and how many children to have. IPPF will deliver high impact, quality, rights-based, integrated sexual and reproductive health services, including packages that address family planning, safe abortion, prenatal care, STIs/HIV, sexual and gender-based violence and cervical cancer. IPPF will optimize the number of people it can serve by increasing operational effectiveness, expanding provision in humanitarian emergencies and increasing national and global income to provide the increased services. The Federation will also enable the provision of services by other public and private health providers.

IPPF's pledged to serve 60million more women
news_item

| 28 January 2016

Pledging to reach new contraceptive users: Turning Family Planning into Future Planning for 60 Million Women

The International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) announced its most ambitious pledge ever: to realize the human rights of a further 60 million women to choose freely the size of their families. The pledge was unveiled as IPPF's global contribution to the Family Planning 2020 goal at the International Family Planning Conference in Indonesia today.     IPPF is committed to working with Family Planning 2020 and the global family planning community to reach the goal of ensuring 120 million additional women have access to family planning by 2020. The Federation, with the world's largest non-governmental family planning service delivery network, has driven its own performance since the London Summit reaching 15 million new users of modern family planning. IPPF is now upwardly revised its pledged contribution towards the global FP2020 goal. Thank you to @ippf for pledge to serve 60M NEW users of contraception to meet #FP2020 goals! #ICFP — Family Planning 2020 (@FP2020Global) January 28, 2016 Tewodros Melesse, IPPF Director General, announcing the pledge, said “This is not a game of numbers. For us, it's very simple, it can only be about putting women at the front and centre of what we do. I'm delighted by what we have achieved and that we can make this significant and increased contribution through this pledge. Since 2012, IPPF's total reported client numbers increased by nearly 40 per cent. This was achieved by expanding our client base, not by changing who we serve. We have raised investment in family planning and improved our overall performance." Building on this success, IPPF has set an even more ambitious target for new users to contraception. Between 2015 and 2020 IPPF pledges to reach a further 45 million new users in the FP2020 focus countries. This will mean that IPPF will serve a total of 60 million new users between 2012 and 2020, a major contribution towards the FP2020 goal. Dr. Ariel Pablos-Méndez, Assistant Administrator for Global Health and Child and Maternal Survival Coordinator, Global Health Bureau, USAID said on IPPF's announcement,'Community driven approaches increase access for new users to family planning. When offered alongside a basket of primary health services - like those provided by IPPF - poor, young and rural women and men can get the voluntary family planning and other health programs that focus on their needs. This client-focused approach will get us another step closer to our FP 2020 goals and ultimately universal health coverage." “FP2020 congratulates IPPF on this ambitious renewed commitment to advancing the rights of women and girls around the world to decide for themselves when and how many children to have,” said Beth Schlachter, FP2020 Executive Director. “IPPF has been a leader in providing modern contraception to women and girls for decades, and as key partners in the global FP2020 movement they are helping ensure that family planning remains a central part of the global development agenda as we work towards achieving the Sustainable Development Goals and universal access.” IPPF is on target to achieve our goal of doubling the number of services provided by 2015. This is a milestone towards the Federation's commitment to treble the number of its high-impact life-saving and changing sexual and reproductive health services provided by 2020. Between 2012 and 2014, IPPF achieved a significant increase in access for new users of modern contraception. In 59 of the 69 FP2020 focus countries where IPPF is operational, the Federation provided family planning services to 15 million new users in just three years. Our Strategic Framework which started in January 2016, renews and strengthens its commitment to support the rights of women and girls to decide freely whether, when and how many children to have. IPPF will deliver high impact, quality, rights-based, integrated sexual and reproductive health services, including packages that address family planning, safe abortion, prenatal care, STIs/HIV, sexual and gender-based violence and cervical cancer. IPPF will optimize the number of people it can serve by increasing operational effectiveness, expanding provision in humanitarian emergencies and increasing national and global income to provide the increased services. The Federation will also enable the provision of services by other public and private health providers.

An digital billboard in Times Square reading: "I decide the size of my family"
news item

| 17 August 2016

Thousands sign up to support sexual health

A 410,000–strong petition has been handed to the United Nations calling for women and girls to be put at the heart of the world’s next poverty reduction targets. The I Decide petition, which was started by the International Planned Parenthood Federation, aimed to ensure that sexual and reproductive health and rights were a central focus of the Sustainable Development Goals being decided this month (SDGs). People from 151 countries around the world signed the petition which has been handed to the United Nations Secretary General, Ban Ki-Moon. In a letter to Mr Ban, the Director-General of IPPF Tewodros Melesse, said: “IPPF has gathered the hopes of women, men and young people -gathered from around the world – who have called for the ability to decide on their own futures, including what happens to their bodies, who they share their life with and the size of their families. “They expressed their support for sexual and reproductive health and rights to be at the heart of the new development framework and we are grateful for your support in ensuring this is the case,” he added.  

An digital billboard in Times Square reading: "I decide the size of my family"
news_item

| 29 September 2015

Thousands sign up to support sexual health

A 410,000–strong petition has been handed to the United Nations calling for women and girls to be put at the heart of the world’s next poverty reduction targets. The I Decide petition, which was started by the International Planned Parenthood Federation, aimed to ensure that sexual and reproductive health and rights were a central focus of the Sustainable Development Goals being decided this month (SDGs). People from 151 countries around the world signed the petition which has been handed to the United Nations Secretary General, Ban Ki-Moon. In a letter to Mr Ban, the Director-General of IPPF Tewodros Melesse, said: “IPPF has gathered the hopes of women, men and young people -gathered from around the world – who have called for the ability to decide on their own futures, including what happens to their bodies, who they share their life with and the size of their families. “They expressed their support for sexual and reproductive health and rights to be at the heart of the new development framework and we are grateful for your support in ensuring this is the case,” he added.  

mother and child
news item

| 03 August 2015

A win for women and girls; Now words must become action

The governments of the world have committed to making sure that every girl and woman can live free from discrimination and have access to sexual and reproductive health and reproductive rights within one generation. When implemented, this agenda will save millions of lives. On Sunday, August 3rd, with the conclusion of the final Intergovernmental Negotiations for the post-2015 development framework, governments have finalized the new development framework “Transforming Our World: The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development”. It is expected that this final agreement will be formally adopted at the United Nations Summit on the post-2015 development agenda on September 25 to 27, 2015. But although it represents a big leap forward, the words must become action. Tewodros Melesse, Director General of IPPF said: “Today we welcome the commitment that governments are making to put women and girls first, including realising their sexual and reproductive health and reproductive rights. If we want this new agenda to change lives – and save lives – it must become a reality on the ground. We are calling on all governments to implement this agenda and ensure that there is adequate funding for sexual and reproductive health and rights and to make the ambition of this agenda a reality.” This Agenda is a win for women and girls. It makes a commitment to ending poverty and protecting the health of the planet, as well as setting out an ambitious agenda for gender equality and women’s empowerment. The goals and targets require every country to take measures to reduce maternal mortality, end HIV, eliminate violence against women and harmful traditional practices, and ensure that everyone has access to Universal Health Coverage,  access to sexual and reproductive health care services and the fulfilment of their reproductive rights. It will ensure that the 225 million women who want to, but cannot, access modern contraception will be able to finally make decisions about their families, their bodies and their futures.  It will help end early and forced marriage, which currently sees 15 million girls married before their 18th birthdays every year. We also welcome the reaffirmation of the Programme of Action of the International Conference on Population and Development, the Beijing Platform for Action; and the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development (“Rio+ 20”), including their follow-up conferences, as these are foundational documents upon which the agenda is built.  The Universal Declaration of Human Rights is also specifically mentioned as the basis of the new agenda, which further strengthens its people-centered focus. However, the new Agenda fails to define specific accountability mechanisms to promote the full implementation of the agenda and to provide citizens with the tools to hold governments to account for their actions. It is also disappointing that the essential role of civil society participation in planning, implementation and accountability was not stronger. IPPF also called for the inclusion of sexual rights in the final document, however the specific wins in the final 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development that IPPF successfully advocated for include: A standalone goal on gender equality and the empowerment of women and girls, including specific targets on eliminating discrimination and violence against women and girls, and ending early and forced marriage and female genital mutilation. This goal also contains a target on ensuring universal access to sexual and reproductive health and reproductive rights as agreed in accordance with the Programme of Action of the International Conference on Population and Development and the Beijing Platform for Action and the outcome documents of their review conferences. A standalone goal on ensuring healthy lives and promoting well-being. This contains a commitment to ensuring universal access to sexual and reproductive health care services, including for family planning, information and education, and the integration of reproductive health into national strategies and programmes, as well as reducing the global maternal mortality ratio to less than 70 per 100,000 live births, and ending the epidemic of HIV. A Declaration that emphasized the importance of gender equality and the empowerment of women and girls as a crucial contribution to progress across all goals and targets. It also emphasized the fundamental role of human rights and the responsibility of States to work to realize human rights for all. 

mother and child
news_item

| 03 August 2015

A win for women and girls; Now words must become action

The governments of the world have committed to making sure that every girl and woman can live free from discrimination and have access to sexual and reproductive health and reproductive rights within one generation. When implemented, this agenda will save millions of lives. On Sunday, August 3rd, with the conclusion of the final Intergovernmental Negotiations for the post-2015 development framework, governments have finalized the new development framework “Transforming Our World: The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development”. It is expected that this final agreement will be formally adopted at the United Nations Summit on the post-2015 development agenda on September 25 to 27, 2015. But although it represents a big leap forward, the words must become action. Tewodros Melesse, Director General of IPPF said: “Today we welcome the commitment that governments are making to put women and girls first, including realising their sexual and reproductive health and reproductive rights. If we want this new agenda to change lives – and save lives – it must become a reality on the ground. We are calling on all governments to implement this agenda and ensure that there is adequate funding for sexual and reproductive health and rights and to make the ambition of this agenda a reality.” This Agenda is a win for women and girls. It makes a commitment to ending poverty and protecting the health of the planet, as well as setting out an ambitious agenda for gender equality and women’s empowerment. The goals and targets require every country to take measures to reduce maternal mortality, end HIV, eliminate violence against women and harmful traditional practices, and ensure that everyone has access to Universal Health Coverage,  access to sexual and reproductive health care services and the fulfilment of their reproductive rights. It will ensure that the 225 million women who want to, but cannot, access modern contraception will be able to finally make decisions about their families, their bodies and their futures.  It will help end early and forced marriage, which currently sees 15 million girls married before their 18th birthdays every year. We also welcome the reaffirmation of the Programme of Action of the International Conference on Population and Development, the Beijing Platform for Action; and the United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development (“Rio+ 20”), including their follow-up conferences, as these are foundational documents upon which the agenda is built.  The Universal Declaration of Human Rights is also specifically mentioned as the basis of the new agenda, which further strengthens its people-centered focus. However, the new Agenda fails to define specific accountability mechanisms to promote the full implementation of the agenda and to provide citizens with the tools to hold governments to account for their actions. It is also disappointing that the essential role of civil society participation in planning, implementation and accountability was not stronger. IPPF also called for the inclusion of sexual rights in the final document, however the specific wins in the final 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development that IPPF successfully advocated for include: A standalone goal on gender equality and the empowerment of women and girls, including specific targets on eliminating discrimination and violence against women and girls, and ending early and forced marriage and female genital mutilation. This goal also contains a target on ensuring universal access to sexual and reproductive health and reproductive rights as agreed in accordance with the Programme of Action of the International Conference on Population and Development and the Beijing Platform for Action and the outcome documents of their review conferences. A standalone goal on ensuring healthy lives and promoting well-being. This contains a commitment to ensuring universal access to sexual and reproductive health care services, including for family planning, information and education, and the integration of reproductive health into national strategies and programmes, as well as reducing the global maternal mortality ratio to less than 70 per 100,000 live births, and ending the epidemic of HIV. A Declaration that emphasized the importance of gender equality and the empowerment of women and girls as a crucial contribution to progress across all goals and targets. It also emphasized the fundamental role of human rights and the responsibility of States to work to realize human rights for all.