Contraception

One of our main priorities is to ensure universal access to, and informed use of effective contraception. Millions of people lack the knowledge and information to determine when or whether they have children, and they are unable to protect themselves against sexually transmitted infections (STIs).

Raphel Marafan Kori, earns an income as a peer educator with Lesotho Planned Parenthood Association (LPPA). Nine months into her role, she goes door to door in her village trying to ensure parents understand the needs of adolescents in their village and why contraception and services like HIV testing is a protective measure for young people.
Bolelwa Falten in based in Lesotho's capital, Maseru, and has been working as an HIV counselor for the better part of a decade. She handles five different Lesotho Planned Parenthood Association posts, providing communities with everything from contraception to HIV testing.
34-year old Makamohelo Tlali is a relatively new beneficiary of family planning services offered monthly at a Lesotho Planned Parenthood Association (LPPA) post near her village. She was encouraged to visit the family planning clinic by a peer mobilizer going door to door in her village.
Contraception use is on the rise, partly thanks to the outreach work The Association Togolaise pour le Bien-Être Familial (ATBEF), in rural communities. Using a network of community-based volunteers and village leaders, ATBEF is reaching as many people as possible.
The unmet need for contraception in Togo currently stands at 34% of the population. Association Togolaise pour le Bien-Être Familial (ATBEF) are turning clients like Dahide and village chief Sossou Sagna into family planning advocates within their communities.
Abla Abassa is a community health worker for Association Togolaise pour le Bien-Être Familial (ATBEF), Togo. She is one of 279 community workers in her region and her work takes her to the remotes areas where the unmet need for contraception is the greatest.
Realizing the importance of involving village leaders to educate their local communities on the harms of forced early marriage and forced sex work in rural areas, Association Togolaise Pour le Bien-Être Familial (ATBEF) created the Village Girl Protection Charters. To date, 870 villages have signed up.
After marrying early, 21-year-old Muna decided that two children was what she wanted for the time being. So she approached the Family Planning Association of Nepal for help.
Two years after the earthquake that struck Nepal in April 2015, the village of Gatlang in the country’s mountainous north still lies in partial ruin. Families are still living in temporary shelters, unable to afford the enormous cost of rebuilding their old home.
High up in the mountains of central northern Nepal, not far from the Tibetan border, lies the district of Rasuwa. The people here are mainly ethnic Tamang and Sherpa, two indigenous groups with cultural traditions stretching back centuries. But these rich cultural traditions can come hand-in-hand with severe social problems, compounded by entrenched poverty and very low literacy rates.