Gynaecological

Raising three children by herself, Lijana did not have time to think about her health. That was until she could no longe ignore the feeling that something was wrong. Through friends, she discovered the Albanian Centre of Population and Development (ACDP) clinic. It changed her life.
Eleanor's first cervical cancer screening came back negative. Three years later at her follow-up appointment, she expected the same negative result. Unfortunately, this time it was positive. Once she successfully completed her treatment, her experience turned her into an ardent activist for cervical cancer prevention in her community.
Through social media, 21-year-old Artemisa Seraj stumbled across a post from Aulona center, offering free workshops and seminars on sexual and reproductive healthcare. Curious to learn more about the 'taboo' subject, she attended a talk and was immediately convinced that she wanted to do more to empower women and girls in her community.
Hatixhe is a nurse at the Albanian Centre of Population and Development clinic. With 39 years of experience in gynaecology, she has seen vast improvements in access and services, and believes VIA and cryotherapy is a step further in the right direction for women's healthcare.
Amal Ahmed, the executive director of our Member Association in Somaliland (SOFHA) recounts her personal experience of being one of the 97-98% of young girls forced to undergo female genital mutilation in Somaliland.
"We open at 8am. From 8am we will be receiving a variety of clients for different services - whether post-abortion care, whether antenatal care - we have to give them all the services. We may end up to 10pm, because we'll never chase our clients, we'll never close the place when we have a client inside.
Every Thursday a team from RHU Gulu district provides a mobile outreach clinic in Atega village in the Omoro district in Northern Uganda. The outreach team goes out into this poor, remote area which would otherwise not have access to ...
"Us people with disabilities have challenges at the main hospitals. People around look at you as if you are not a human being and you don’t fall sick.”
"As a child I loved the medical profession so much. And I knew one day, I would be wearing one of those uniforms serving my community.”
Twenty-year-old Prudence Mwelwa (not her real name) is convinced she would have died if she had tried to have her first baby at home in her village in Zambia. She said there was a lot of blood during her delivery ...