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IPPF/Tommy Trenchard

Resources

Latest resources from across the federation and our partners
IMAP statement on expanding access and contraceptive choice
Resource

| 06 December 2019

IMAP statement on expanding access and contraceptive choice through integrated sexual and reproductive health services

In 2018, IPPF endorsed the WHO/UNFPA Call to Action to Attain Universal Health Coverage Through Linked Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights and HIV Interventions.13 This IMAP statement serves as a reminder of this call to action to ensure all people have access to comprehensive SRH services, including integrated contraceptive and HIV/STI services, provided through primary healthcare.

IMAP statement on expanding access and contraceptive choice
Resource

| 06 December 2019

IMAP statement on expanding access and contraceptive choice through integrated sexual and reproductive health services

In 2018, IPPF endorsed the WHO/UNFPA Call to Action to Attain Universal Health Coverage Through Linked Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights and HIV Interventions.13 This IMAP statement serves as a reminder of this call to action to ensure all people have access to comprehensive SRH services, including integrated contraceptive and HIV/STI services, provided through primary healthcare.

echo trial
Resource

| 28 October 2019

After the ECHO trial – Expanding access and choice through integrated services

Since the early 1990s, the evidence has been inconclusive as to whether using hormonal contraception increases women’s risk of acquiring HIV, particularly among progestogen-only injectable users. Observational studies indicated that women using progestogen-only injectable contraceptive methods may be at higher risk of acquiring human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).  The Evidence for Contraceptive Options and HIV Outcomes (ECHO) trial finds no link between HIV acquisition and the use of DMPA-IM, progestogen implant, and non-hormonal copper IUD. For more information please see the technical brief on the ECHO trial.  Following the release of the result of the ECHO trial and the WHO latest guidance statement and revised Medical Eligibility Criteria (MEC) for contraceptive use, IPPF developed a follow-up technical brief to support IPPF MAs and frontline service providers’ work regarding the provision of the integrated contraceptive, HIV and other STI programmes to expand access and contraceptive choice. For more information, please see the attached technical brief After the ECHO trial – Expanding access and choice through integrated services, available in English and French.

echo trial
Resource

| 28 October 2019

After the ECHO trial – Expanding access and choice through integrated services

Since the early 1990s, the evidence has been inconclusive as to whether using hormonal contraception increases women’s risk of acquiring HIV, particularly among progestogen-only injectable users. Observational studies indicated that women using progestogen-only injectable contraceptive methods may be at higher risk of acquiring human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).  The Evidence for Contraceptive Options and HIV Outcomes (ECHO) trial finds no link between HIV acquisition and the use of DMPA-IM, progestogen implant, and non-hormonal copper IUD. For more information please see the technical brief on the ECHO trial.  Following the release of the result of the ECHO trial and the WHO latest guidance statement and revised Medical Eligibility Criteria (MEC) for contraceptive use, IPPF developed a follow-up technical brief to support IPPF MAs and frontline service providers’ work regarding the provision of the integrated contraceptive, HIV and other STI programmes to expand access and contraceptive choice. For more information, please see the attached technical brief After the ECHO trial – Expanding access and choice through integrated services, available in English and French.

ECHO trail
Resource

| 09 July 2019

IPPF Technical Brief on the ECHO trial

Since the early 1990s, the evidence has been inconclusive as to whether using hormonal contraception increases women’s risk of acquiring HIV, particularly among progestogen-only injectable users. Observational studies indicated that women using progestogen-only injectable contraceptive methods may be at higher risk of acquiring human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).  The ECHO trial finds no link between HIV acquisition and the use of DMPA-IM, progestogen implant, and non-hormonal copper IUD. 

ECHO trail
Resource

| 09 July 2019

IPPF Technical Brief on the ECHO trial

Since the early 1990s, the evidence has been inconclusive as to whether using hormonal contraception increases women’s risk of acquiring HIV, particularly among progestogen-only injectable users. Observational studies indicated that women using progestogen-only injectable contraceptive methods may be at higher risk of acquiring human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).  The ECHO trial finds no link between HIV acquisition and the use of DMPA-IM, progestogen implant, and non-hormonal copper IUD. 

Injectables - techical brief
Resource

| 15 March 2018

Integration of DMPA‑SC into the method mix contributes to increased uptake of all methods of family planning

Injectable contraceptives are an increasingly popular method of family planning. They are safe, discrete, highly effective, and generally last for several months. Sayana® Press, also known as subcutaneous depot medroxyprogesterone (DMPA‑SC), is a lower‑dose formula version of the already popular injectable Depo‑Provera. DMPA‑SC combines the drug and needle in a single‑use unit, which makes it easy to transport and simple to use with little training. DMPA‑SC can be administered by community health workers (CHWs) and women themselves – potentially making injectable contraceptives available to women who can’t easily travel to clinics.

Injectables - techical brief
Resource

| 15 March 2018

Integration of DMPA‑SC into the method mix contributes to increased uptake of all methods of family planning

Injectable contraceptives are an increasingly popular method of family planning. They are safe, discrete, highly effective, and generally last for several months. Sayana® Press, also known as subcutaneous depot medroxyprogesterone (DMPA‑SC), is a lower‑dose formula version of the already popular injectable Depo‑Provera. DMPA‑SC combines the drug and needle in a single‑use unit, which makes it easy to transport and simple to use with little training. DMPA‑SC can be administered by community health workers (CHWs) and women themselves – potentially making injectable contraceptives available to women who can’t easily travel to clinics.

imap on ec
Resource

| 14 March 2018

IMAP Statement on emergency contraception

Emergency contraception (EC) refers to any contraceptive method that can be used after having unprotected or inadequately protected sexual intercourse (UPSI) but before pregnancy occurs, providing women with the opportunity to prevent an unwanted pregnancy. EC is a safe and effective method for preventing unwanted pregnancy and can reduce the risk of pregnancy by up to 99%. In spite of its effectiveness, EC is not frequently used. In many countries, women face barriers to accessing EC. The majority of women in low‑income countries are unaware of EC. Moreover, some providers have negative attitudes toward providing EC to women and girls.

imap on ec
Resource

| 14 March 2018

IMAP Statement on emergency contraception

Emergency contraception (EC) refers to any contraceptive method that can be used after having unprotected or inadequately protected sexual intercourse (UPSI) but before pregnancy occurs, providing women with the opportunity to prevent an unwanted pregnancy. EC is a safe and effective method for preventing unwanted pregnancy and can reduce the risk of pregnancy by up to 99%. In spite of its effectiveness, EC is not frequently used. In many countries, women face barriers to accessing EC. The majority of women in low‑income countries are unaware of EC. Moreover, some providers have negative attitudes toward providing EC to women and girls.

injection
Resource

| 06 February 2018

Myth-busting facts about the contraceptive injection

Watch this short animation to learn more about the contraceptive injection, a contraceptive method that requires no daily action and doesn't interfere with sex.  Learn more about other methods

injection
Resource

| 06 February 2018

Myth-busting facts about the contraceptive injection

Watch this short animation to learn more about the contraceptive injection, a contraceptive method that requires no daily action and doesn't interfere with sex.  Learn more about other methods

IMAP statement on expanding access and contraceptive choice
Resource

| 06 December 2019

IMAP statement on expanding access and contraceptive choice through integrated sexual and reproductive health services

In 2018, IPPF endorsed the WHO/UNFPA Call to Action to Attain Universal Health Coverage Through Linked Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights and HIV Interventions.13 This IMAP statement serves as a reminder of this call to action to ensure all people have access to comprehensive SRH services, including integrated contraceptive and HIV/STI services, provided through primary healthcare.

IMAP statement on expanding access and contraceptive choice
Resource

| 06 December 2019

IMAP statement on expanding access and contraceptive choice through integrated sexual and reproductive health services

In 2018, IPPF endorsed the WHO/UNFPA Call to Action to Attain Universal Health Coverage Through Linked Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights and HIV Interventions.13 This IMAP statement serves as a reminder of this call to action to ensure all people have access to comprehensive SRH services, including integrated contraceptive and HIV/STI services, provided through primary healthcare.

echo trial
Resource

| 28 October 2019

After the ECHO trial – Expanding access and choice through integrated services

Since the early 1990s, the evidence has been inconclusive as to whether using hormonal contraception increases women’s risk of acquiring HIV, particularly among progestogen-only injectable users. Observational studies indicated that women using progestogen-only injectable contraceptive methods may be at higher risk of acquiring human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).  The Evidence for Contraceptive Options and HIV Outcomes (ECHO) trial finds no link between HIV acquisition and the use of DMPA-IM, progestogen implant, and non-hormonal copper IUD. For more information please see the technical brief on the ECHO trial.  Following the release of the result of the ECHO trial and the WHO latest guidance statement and revised Medical Eligibility Criteria (MEC) for contraceptive use, IPPF developed a follow-up technical brief to support IPPF MAs and frontline service providers’ work regarding the provision of the integrated contraceptive, HIV and other STI programmes to expand access and contraceptive choice. For more information, please see the attached technical brief After the ECHO trial – Expanding access and choice through integrated services, available in English and French.

echo trial
Resource

| 28 October 2019

After the ECHO trial – Expanding access and choice through integrated services

Since the early 1990s, the evidence has been inconclusive as to whether using hormonal contraception increases women’s risk of acquiring HIV, particularly among progestogen-only injectable users. Observational studies indicated that women using progestogen-only injectable contraceptive methods may be at higher risk of acquiring human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).  The Evidence for Contraceptive Options and HIV Outcomes (ECHO) trial finds no link between HIV acquisition and the use of DMPA-IM, progestogen implant, and non-hormonal copper IUD. For more information please see the technical brief on the ECHO trial.  Following the release of the result of the ECHO trial and the WHO latest guidance statement and revised Medical Eligibility Criteria (MEC) for contraceptive use, IPPF developed a follow-up technical brief to support IPPF MAs and frontline service providers’ work regarding the provision of the integrated contraceptive, HIV and other STI programmes to expand access and contraceptive choice. For more information, please see the attached technical brief After the ECHO trial – Expanding access and choice through integrated services, available in English and French.

ECHO trail
Resource

| 09 July 2019

IPPF Technical Brief on the ECHO trial

Since the early 1990s, the evidence has been inconclusive as to whether using hormonal contraception increases women’s risk of acquiring HIV, particularly among progestogen-only injectable users. Observational studies indicated that women using progestogen-only injectable contraceptive methods may be at higher risk of acquiring human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).  The ECHO trial finds no link between HIV acquisition and the use of DMPA-IM, progestogen implant, and non-hormonal copper IUD. 

ECHO trail
Resource

| 09 July 2019

IPPF Technical Brief on the ECHO trial

Since the early 1990s, the evidence has been inconclusive as to whether using hormonal contraception increases women’s risk of acquiring HIV, particularly among progestogen-only injectable users. Observational studies indicated that women using progestogen-only injectable contraceptive methods may be at higher risk of acquiring human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).  The ECHO trial finds no link between HIV acquisition and the use of DMPA-IM, progestogen implant, and non-hormonal copper IUD. 

Injectables - techical brief
Resource

| 15 March 2018

Integration of DMPA‑SC into the method mix contributes to increased uptake of all methods of family planning

Injectable contraceptives are an increasingly popular method of family planning. They are safe, discrete, highly effective, and generally last for several months. Sayana® Press, also known as subcutaneous depot medroxyprogesterone (DMPA‑SC), is a lower‑dose formula version of the already popular injectable Depo‑Provera. DMPA‑SC combines the drug and needle in a single‑use unit, which makes it easy to transport and simple to use with little training. DMPA‑SC can be administered by community health workers (CHWs) and women themselves – potentially making injectable contraceptives available to women who can’t easily travel to clinics.

Injectables - techical brief
Resource

| 15 March 2018

Integration of DMPA‑SC into the method mix contributes to increased uptake of all methods of family planning

Injectable contraceptives are an increasingly popular method of family planning. They are safe, discrete, highly effective, and generally last for several months. Sayana® Press, also known as subcutaneous depot medroxyprogesterone (DMPA‑SC), is a lower‑dose formula version of the already popular injectable Depo‑Provera. DMPA‑SC combines the drug and needle in a single‑use unit, which makes it easy to transport and simple to use with little training. DMPA‑SC can be administered by community health workers (CHWs) and women themselves – potentially making injectable contraceptives available to women who can’t easily travel to clinics.

imap on ec
Resource

| 14 March 2018

IMAP Statement on emergency contraception

Emergency contraception (EC) refers to any contraceptive method that can be used after having unprotected or inadequately protected sexual intercourse (UPSI) but before pregnancy occurs, providing women with the opportunity to prevent an unwanted pregnancy. EC is a safe and effective method for preventing unwanted pregnancy and can reduce the risk of pregnancy by up to 99%. In spite of its effectiveness, EC is not frequently used. In many countries, women face barriers to accessing EC. The majority of women in low‑income countries are unaware of EC. Moreover, some providers have negative attitudes toward providing EC to women and girls.

imap on ec
Resource

| 14 March 2018

IMAP Statement on emergency contraception

Emergency contraception (EC) refers to any contraceptive method that can be used after having unprotected or inadequately protected sexual intercourse (UPSI) but before pregnancy occurs, providing women with the opportunity to prevent an unwanted pregnancy. EC is a safe and effective method for preventing unwanted pregnancy and can reduce the risk of pregnancy by up to 99%. In spite of its effectiveness, EC is not frequently used. In many countries, women face barriers to accessing EC. The majority of women in low‑income countries are unaware of EC. Moreover, some providers have negative attitudes toward providing EC to women and girls.

injection
Resource

| 06 February 2018

Myth-busting facts about the contraceptive injection

Watch this short animation to learn more about the contraceptive injection, a contraceptive method that requires no daily action and doesn't interfere with sex.  Learn more about other methods

injection
Resource

| 06 February 2018

Myth-busting facts about the contraceptive injection

Watch this short animation to learn more about the contraceptive injection, a contraceptive method that requires no daily action and doesn't interfere with sex.  Learn more about other methods