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IPPF/Tommy Trenchard

Resources

Latest resources from across the federation and our partners
Refugee family
Resource

| 18 June 2020

Forced to flee from home... What would you do?

Forced to flee from home... What would you do?People are being forced from their homes more than ever. Whether they are fleeing conflict or lose their homes to natural disasters, there are an estimated 70.8 million refugees worldwide. Women & girls are often most at risk – the threat of sexual and gender-based violence increases as does the risk of trafficking, and basic healthcare can get overlooked.  We want to know: what would you do under these circumstances? Life has always been largely peaceful in your country until one day civil war suddenly breaks out and you and your family are forced to flee home.Once you cross the border and are settled into a refugee camp, your husband refuses to use contraception and your injectable is only effective for 12 weeks.You are worried you’ll get pregnant again, something you do not want to happen whilst you are in the refugee camp with limited access to healthcare, and whilst your family is already struggling to survive.You decide to:Your name is Fatima, and you are a 29-year-old high school teacher. You are married with two young children – a daughter aged four, and a son, two. After a few months in the camp you realise you are pregnant. Abortion is legal in your host country, but as a refugee you are unsure of your rights and the closest hospital is over 60km away.You hear about abortion pills from other women in the camp that are available through local mobile clinics.You decide to:You seek advice on the methods of contraception available to you from the local outreach worker. You decide on a long-acting contraceptive method called Jadelle, an implant.As you are worried that your husband will find out, the outreach worker advises you to bring him along to a group session on contraception.You decide to:You are able to receive medical abortion pills through a nurse practitioner at the local clinic, who explains you the safe way to take the pills at home. She also provides you with contraception counselling and options for the future. At the local district hospital, medical practitioners are under the misbelief it is not possible to provide surgical abortions to refugees, whilst others refuse to provide abortions on moral grounds, therefore forcing you through an unintended pregnancy. You and your husband attend the family planning session with other couples from the camp. Your husband is convinced of the importance of contraception and you both agree that the Jadelle and condoms are the best options for you to avoid an unintended pregnancy.You now have up to five years of protection against unintended pregnancy. However, you are still worried about the risk of STI and HIV transmission but are unable to talk about contraception to your husband.

Refugee family
Resource

| 18 June 2020

Forced to flee from home... What would you do?

Forced to flee from home... What would you do?People are being forced from their homes more than ever. Whether they are fleeing conflict or lose their homes to natural disasters, there are an estimated 70.8 million refugees worldwide. Women & girls are often most at risk – the threat of sexual and gender-based violence increases as does the risk of trafficking, and basic healthcare can get overlooked.  We want to know: what would you do under these circumstances? Life has always been largely peaceful in your country until one day civil war suddenly breaks out and you and your family are forced to flee home.Once you cross the border and are settled into a refugee camp, your husband refuses to use contraception and your injectable is only effective for 12 weeks.You are worried you’ll get pregnant again, something you do not want to happen whilst you are in the refugee camp with limited access to healthcare, and whilst your family is already struggling to survive.You decide to:Your name is Fatima, and you are a 29-year-old high school teacher. You are married with two young children – a daughter aged four, and a son, two. After a few months in the camp you realise you are pregnant. Abortion is legal in your host country, but as a refugee you are unsure of your rights and the closest hospital is over 60km away.You hear about abortion pills from other women in the camp that are available through local mobile clinics.You decide to:You seek advice on the methods of contraception available to you from the local outreach worker. You decide on a long-acting contraceptive method called Jadelle, an implant.As you are worried that your husband will find out, the outreach worker advises you to bring him along to a group session on contraception.You decide to:You are able to receive medical abortion pills through a nurse practitioner at the local clinic, who explains you the safe way to take the pills at home. She also provides you with contraception counselling and options for the future. At the local district hospital, medical practitioners are under the misbelief it is not possible to provide surgical abortions to refugees, whilst others refuse to provide abortions on moral grounds, therefore forcing you through an unintended pregnancy. You and your husband attend the family planning session with other couples from the camp. Your husband is convinced of the importance of contraception and you both agree that the Jadelle and condoms are the best options for you to avoid an unintended pregnancy.You now have up to five years of protection against unintended pregnancy. However, you are still worried about the risk of STI and HIV transmission but are unable to talk about contraception to your husband.

IMAP statement on expanding access and contraceptive choice
Resource

| 06 December 2019

IMAP statement on expanding access and contraceptive choice through integrated sexual and reproductive health services

In 2018, IPPF endorsed the WHO/UNFPA Call to Action to Attain Universal Health Coverage Through Linked Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights and HIV Interventions.13 This IMAP statement serves as a reminder of this call to action to ensure all people have access to comprehensive SRH services, including integrated contraceptive and HIV/STI services, provided through primary healthcare.

IMAP statement on expanding access and contraceptive choice
Resource

| 06 December 2019

IMAP statement on expanding access and contraceptive choice through integrated sexual and reproductive health services

In 2018, IPPF endorsed the WHO/UNFPA Call to Action to Attain Universal Health Coverage Through Linked Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights and HIV Interventions.13 This IMAP statement serves as a reminder of this call to action to ensure all people have access to comprehensive SRH services, including integrated contraceptive and HIV/STI services, provided through primary healthcare.

echo trial
Resource

| 28 October 2019

After the ECHO trial – Expanding access and choice through integrated services

Since the early 1990s, the evidence has been inconclusive as to whether using hormonal contraception increases women’s risk of acquiring HIV, particularly among progestogen-only injectable users. Observational studies indicated that women using progestogen-only injectable contraceptive methods may be at higher risk of acquiring human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).  The Evidence for Contraceptive Options and HIV Outcomes (ECHO) trial finds no link between HIV acquisition and the use of DMPA-IM, progestogen implant, and non-hormonal copper IUD. For more information please see the technical brief on the ECHO trial.  Following the release of the result of the ECHO trial and the WHO latest guidance statement and revised Medical Eligibility Criteria (MEC) for contraceptive use, IPPF developed a follow-up technical brief to support IPPF MAs and frontline service providers’ work regarding the provision of the integrated contraceptive, HIV and other STI programmes to expand access and contraceptive choice. For more information, please see the attached technical brief After the ECHO trial – Expanding access and choice through integrated services, available in English and French.

echo trial
Resource

| 28 October 2019

After the ECHO trial – Expanding access and choice through integrated services

Since the early 1990s, the evidence has been inconclusive as to whether using hormonal contraception increases women’s risk of acquiring HIV, particularly among progestogen-only injectable users. Observational studies indicated that women using progestogen-only injectable contraceptive methods may be at higher risk of acquiring human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).  The Evidence for Contraceptive Options and HIV Outcomes (ECHO) trial finds no link between HIV acquisition and the use of DMPA-IM, progestogen implant, and non-hormonal copper IUD. For more information please see the technical brief on the ECHO trial.  Following the release of the result of the ECHO trial and the WHO latest guidance statement and revised Medical Eligibility Criteria (MEC) for contraceptive use, IPPF developed a follow-up technical brief to support IPPF MAs and frontline service providers’ work regarding the provision of the integrated contraceptive, HIV and other STI programmes to expand access and contraceptive choice. For more information, please see the attached technical brief After the ECHO trial – Expanding access and choice through integrated services, available in English and French.

Beauty parlour-related training
Resource

| 08 August 2019

Watch - Beauty Behind Bars: Life after prison for women in India

India is home to 20 female-only prisons, that have the capacity to hold just 5,000 inmates. Women currently make up 4% of India's prison population. Before they reach prison, many women have already experienced sexual and gender-based violence. Many inmates face discrimination and are often ostracized from their community and their families once they are released. Realizing a gap in care for women once released, the Family Planning Association of India (FPAI) have stepped in to ensure women are equipped with not only healthcare whilst in prison but life training skills. Skills that will financially support them and their children with or without the support of their families. Established in 1949, the Family Planning Association of India has provided life skills training ranging from beauty parlour related work to car mechanics to 768 women in six locations.

Beauty parlour-related training
Resource

| 08 August 2019

Watch - Beauty Behind Bars: Life after prison for women in India

India is home to 20 female-only prisons, that have the capacity to hold just 5,000 inmates. Women currently make up 4% of India's prison population. Before they reach prison, many women have already experienced sexual and gender-based violence. Many inmates face discrimination and are often ostracized from their community and their families once they are released. Realizing a gap in care for women once released, the Family Planning Association of India (FPAI) have stepped in to ensure women are equipped with not only healthcare whilst in prison but life training skills. Skills that will financially support them and their children with or without the support of their families. Established in 1949, the Family Planning Association of India has provided life skills training ranging from beauty parlour related work to car mechanics to 768 women in six locations.

ECHO trail
Resource

| 09 July 2019

IPPF Technical Brief on the ECHO trial

Since the early 1990s, the evidence has been inconclusive as to whether using hormonal contraception increases women’s risk of acquiring HIV, particularly among progestogen-only injectable users. Observational studies indicated that women using progestogen-only injectable contraceptive methods may be at higher risk of acquiring human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).  The ECHO trial finds no link between HIV acquisition and the use of DMPA-IM, progestogen implant, and non-hormonal copper IUD. 

ECHO trail
Resource

| 09 July 2019

IPPF Technical Brief on the ECHO trial

Since the early 1990s, the evidence has been inconclusive as to whether using hormonal contraception increases women’s risk of acquiring HIV, particularly among progestogen-only injectable users. Observational studies indicated that women using progestogen-only injectable contraceptive methods may be at higher risk of acquiring human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).  The ECHO trial finds no link between HIV acquisition and the use of DMPA-IM, progestogen implant, and non-hormonal copper IUD. 

Floods in Belkuchi, Bangladesh
Resource

| 03 April 2019

Improving the quality and availability of post-abortion care in a humanitarian crisis

The world is facing stronger and longer natural disasters, protracted complex emergencies, conflicts and epidemics. These humanitarian crises can expose weakness in health systems, with particularly serious consequences for women and girls in need of reproductive health care. To improve the quality and availability of post‑abortion care during a flood, the University of Leicester and International Planned Parenthood Federation South Asia Region (IPPF-SAR), in collaboration with the Government of Bangladesh, developed and measured the impact of an integrated intervention package, called RHCC. First tested in a flood-prone area of Bangladesh, this novel approach includes: i) Pre-positioning medicines and supplies, using the UNFPA’s Inter-Agency Reproductive Health Kit 8; ii) Capacity building of service providers; and iii) Community awareness raising. Supported by IPPF's Innovation Programme, the project aligns with IPPF’s commitment to ensuring that crisis-affected populations receive timely, quality, life-saving, gender-responsive and inclusive sexual and reproductive health services.  

Floods in Belkuchi, Bangladesh
Resource

| 03 April 2019

Improving the quality and availability of post-abortion care in a humanitarian crisis

The world is facing stronger and longer natural disasters, protracted complex emergencies, conflicts and epidemics. These humanitarian crises can expose weakness in health systems, with particularly serious consequences for women and girls in need of reproductive health care. To improve the quality and availability of post‑abortion care during a flood, the University of Leicester and International Planned Parenthood Federation South Asia Region (IPPF-SAR), in collaboration with the Government of Bangladesh, developed and measured the impact of an integrated intervention package, called RHCC. First tested in a flood-prone area of Bangladesh, this novel approach includes: i) Pre-positioning medicines and supplies, using the UNFPA’s Inter-Agency Reproductive Health Kit 8; ii) Capacity building of service providers; and iii) Community awareness raising. Supported by IPPF's Innovation Programme, the project aligns with IPPF’s commitment to ensuring that crisis-affected populations receive timely, quality, life-saving, gender-responsive and inclusive sexual and reproductive health services.  

Refugee family
Resource

| 18 June 2020

Forced to flee from home... What would you do?

Forced to flee from home... What would you do?People are being forced from their homes more than ever. Whether they are fleeing conflict or lose their homes to natural disasters, there are an estimated 70.8 million refugees worldwide. Women & girls are often most at risk – the threat of sexual and gender-based violence increases as does the risk of trafficking, and basic healthcare can get overlooked.  We want to know: what would you do under these circumstances? Life has always been largely peaceful in your country until one day civil war suddenly breaks out and you and your family are forced to flee home.Once you cross the border and are settled into a refugee camp, your husband refuses to use contraception and your injectable is only effective for 12 weeks.You are worried you’ll get pregnant again, something you do not want to happen whilst you are in the refugee camp with limited access to healthcare, and whilst your family is already struggling to survive.You decide to:Your name is Fatima, and you are a 29-year-old high school teacher. You are married with two young children – a daughter aged four, and a son, two. After a few months in the camp you realise you are pregnant. Abortion is legal in your host country, but as a refugee you are unsure of your rights and the closest hospital is over 60km away.You hear about abortion pills from other women in the camp that are available through local mobile clinics.You decide to:You seek advice on the methods of contraception available to you from the local outreach worker. You decide on a long-acting contraceptive method called Jadelle, an implant.As you are worried that your husband will find out, the outreach worker advises you to bring him along to a group session on contraception.You decide to:You are able to receive medical abortion pills through a nurse practitioner at the local clinic, who explains you the safe way to take the pills at home. She also provides you with contraception counselling and options for the future. At the local district hospital, medical practitioners are under the misbelief it is not possible to provide surgical abortions to refugees, whilst others refuse to provide abortions on moral grounds, therefore forcing you through an unintended pregnancy. You and your husband attend the family planning session with other couples from the camp. Your husband is convinced of the importance of contraception and you both agree that the Jadelle and condoms are the best options for you to avoid an unintended pregnancy.You now have up to five years of protection against unintended pregnancy. However, you are still worried about the risk of STI and HIV transmission but are unable to talk about contraception to your husband.

Refugee family
Resource

| 18 June 2020

Forced to flee from home... What would you do?

Forced to flee from home... What would you do?People are being forced from their homes more than ever. Whether they are fleeing conflict or lose their homes to natural disasters, there are an estimated 70.8 million refugees worldwide. Women & girls are often most at risk – the threat of sexual and gender-based violence increases as does the risk of trafficking, and basic healthcare can get overlooked.  We want to know: what would you do under these circumstances? Life has always been largely peaceful in your country until one day civil war suddenly breaks out and you and your family are forced to flee home.Once you cross the border and are settled into a refugee camp, your husband refuses to use contraception and your injectable is only effective for 12 weeks.You are worried you’ll get pregnant again, something you do not want to happen whilst you are in the refugee camp with limited access to healthcare, and whilst your family is already struggling to survive.You decide to:Your name is Fatima, and you are a 29-year-old high school teacher. You are married with two young children – a daughter aged four, and a son, two. After a few months in the camp you realise you are pregnant. Abortion is legal in your host country, but as a refugee you are unsure of your rights and the closest hospital is over 60km away.You hear about abortion pills from other women in the camp that are available through local mobile clinics.You decide to:You seek advice on the methods of contraception available to you from the local outreach worker. You decide on a long-acting contraceptive method called Jadelle, an implant.As you are worried that your husband will find out, the outreach worker advises you to bring him along to a group session on contraception.You decide to:You are able to receive medical abortion pills through a nurse practitioner at the local clinic, who explains you the safe way to take the pills at home. She also provides you with contraception counselling and options for the future. At the local district hospital, medical practitioners are under the misbelief it is not possible to provide surgical abortions to refugees, whilst others refuse to provide abortions on moral grounds, therefore forcing you through an unintended pregnancy. You and your husband attend the family planning session with other couples from the camp. Your husband is convinced of the importance of contraception and you both agree that the Jadelle and condoms are the best options for you to avoid an unintended pregnancy.You now have up to five years of protection against unintended pregnancy. However, you are still worried about the risk of STI and HIV transmission but are unable to talk about contraception to your husband.

IMAP statement on expanding access and contraceptive choice
Resource

| 06 December 2019

IMAP statement on expanding access and contraceptive choice through integrated sexual and reproductive health services

In 2018, IPPF endorsed the WHO/UNFPA Call to Action to Attain Universal Health Coverage Through Linked Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights and HIV Interventions.13 This IMAP statement serves as a reminder of this call to action to ensure all people have access to comprehensive SRH services, including integrated contraceptive and HIV/STI services, provided through primary healthcare.

IMAP statement on expanding access and contraceptive choice
Resource

| 06 December 2019

IMAP statement on expanding access and contraceptive choice through integrated sexual and reproductive health services

In 2018, IPPF endorsed the WHO/UNFPA Call to Action to Attain Universal Health Coverage Through Linked Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights and HIV Interventions.13 This IMAP statement serves as a reminder of this call to action to ensure all people have access to comprehensive SRH services, including integrated contraceptive and HIV/STI services, provided through primary healthcare.

echo trial
Resource

| 28 October 2019

After the ECHO trial – Expanding access and choice through integrated services

Since the early 1990s, the evidence has been inconclusive as to whether using hormonal contraception increases women’s risk of acquiring HIV, particularly among progestogen-only injectable users. Observational studies indicated that women using progestogen-only injectable contraceptive methods may be at higher risk of acquiring human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).  The Evidence for Contraceptive Options and HIV Outcomes (ECHO) trial finds no link between HIV acquisition and the use of DMPA-IM, progestogen implant, and non-hormonal copper IUD. For more information please see the technical brief on the ECHO trial.  Following the release of the result of the ECHO trial and the WHO latest guidance statement and revised Medical Eligibility Criteria (MEC) for contraceptive use, IPPF developed a follow-up technical brief to support IPPF MAs and frontline service providers’ work regarding the provision of the integrated contraceptive, HIV and other STI programmes to expand access and contraceptive choice. For more information, please see the attached technical brief After the ECHO trial – Expanding access and choice through integrated services, available in English and French.

echo trial
Resource

| 28 October 2019

After the ECHO trial – Expanding access and choice through integrated services

Since the early 1990s, the evidence has been inconclusive as to whether using hormonal contraception increases women’s risk of acquiring HIV, particularly among progestogen-only injectable users. Observational studies indicated that women using progestogen-only injectable contraceptive methods may be at higher risk of acquiring human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).  The Evidence for Contraceptive Options and HIV Outcomes (ECHO) trial finds no link between HIV acquisition and the use of DMPA-IM, progestogen implant, and non-hormonal copper IUD. For more information please see the technical brief on the ECHO trial.  Following the release of the result of the ECHO trial and the WHO latest guidance statement and revised Medical Eligibility Criteria (MEC) for contraceptive use, IPPF developed a follow-up technical brief to support IPPF MAs and frontline service providers’ work regarding the provision of the integrated contraceptive, HIV and other STI programmes to expand access and contraceptive choice. For more information, please see the attached technical brief After the ECHO trial – Expanding access and choice through integrated services, available in English and French.

Beauty parlour-related training
Resource

| 08 August 2019

Watch - Beauty Behind Bars: Life after prison for women in India

India is home to 20 female-only prisons, that have the capacity to hold just 5,000 inmates. Women currently make up 4% of India's prison population. Before they reach prison, many women have already experienced sexual and gender-based violence. Many inmates face discrimination and are often ostracized from their community and their families once they are released. Realizing a gap in care for women once released, the Family Planning Association of India (FPAI) have stepped in to ensure women are equipped with not only healthcare whilst in prison but life training skills. Skills that will financially support them and their children with or without the support of their families. Established in 1949, the Family Planning Association of India has provided life skills training ranging from beauty parlour related work to car mechanics to 768 women in six locations.

Beauty parlour-related training
Resource

| 08 August 2019

Watch - Beauty Behind Bars: Life after prison for women in India

India is home to 20 female-only prisons, that have the capacity to hold just 5,000 inmates. Women currently make up 4% of India's prison population. Before they reach prison, many women have already experienced sexual and gender-based violence. Many inmates face discrimination and are often ostracized from their community and their families once they are released. Realizing a gap in care for women once released, the Family Planning Association of India (FPAI) have stepped in to ensure women are equipped with not only healthcare whilst in prison but life training skills. Skills that will financially support them and their children with or without the support of their families. Established in 1949, the Family Planning Association of India has provided life skills training ranging from beauty parlour related work to car mechanics to 768 women in six locations.

ECHO trail
Resource

| 09 July 2019

IPPF Technical Brief on the ECHO trial

Since the early 1990s, the evidence has been inconclusive as to whether using hormonal contraception increases women’s risk of acquiring HIV, particularly among progestogen-only injectable users. Observational studies indicated that women using progestogen-only injectable contraceptive methods may be at higher risk of acquiring human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).  The ECHO trial finds no link between HIV acquisition and the use of DMPA-IM, progestogen implant, and non-hormonal copper IUD. 

ECHO trail
Resource

| 09 July 2019

IPPF Technical Brief on the ECHO trial

Since the early 1990s, the evidence has been inconclusive as to whether using hormonal contraception increases women’s risk of acquiring HIV, particularly among progestogen-only injectable users. Observational studies indicated that women using progestogen-only injectable contraceptive methods may be at higher risk of acquiring human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).  The ECHO trial finds no link between HIV acquisition and the use of DMPA-IM, progestogen implant, and non-hormonal copper IUD. 

Floods in Belkuchi, Bangladesh
Resource

| 03 April 2019

Improving the quality and availability of post-abortion care in a humanitarian crisis

The world is facing stronger and longer natural disasters, protracted complex emergencies, conflicts and epidemics. These humanitarian crises can expose weakness in health systems, with particularly serious consequences for women and girls in need of reproductive health care. To improve the quality and availability of post‑abortion care during a flood, the University of Leicester and International Planned Parenthood Federation South Asia Region (IPPF-SAR), in collaboration with the Government of Bangladesh, developed and measured the impact of an integrated intervention package, called RHCC. First tested in a flood-prone area of Bangladesh, this novel approach includes: i) Pre-positioning medicines and supplies, using the UNFPA’s Inter-Agency Reproductive Health Kit 8; ii) Capacity building of service providers; and iii) Community awareness raising. Supported by IPPF's Innovation Programme, the project aligns with IPPF’s commitment to ensuring that crisis-affected populations receive timely, quality, life-saving, gender-responsive and inclusive sexual and reproductive health services.  

Floods in Belkuchi, Bangladesh
Resource

| 03 April 2019

Improving the quality and availability of post-abortion care in a humanitarian crisis

The world is facing stronger and longer natural disasters, protracted complex emergencies, conflicts and epidemics. These humanitarian crises can expose weakness in health systems, with particularly serious consequences for women and girls in need of reproductive health care. To improve the quality and availability of post‑abortion care during a flood, the University of Leicester and International Planned Parenthood Federation South Asia Region (IPPF-SAR), in collaboration with the Government of Bangladesh, developed and measured the impact of an integrated intervention package, called RHCC. First tested in a flood-prone area of Bangladesh, this novel approach includes: i) Pre-positioning medicines and supplies, using the UNFPA’s Inter-Agency Reproductive Health Kit 8; ii) Capacity building of service providers; and iii) Community awareness raising. Supported by IPPF's Innovation Programme, the project aligns with IPPF’s commitment to ensuring that crisis-affected populations receive timely, quality, life-saving, gender-responsive and inclusive sexual and reproductive health services.