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IPPF/Tommy Trenchard

Resources

Latest resources from across the federation and our partners
IMAP Statement ECHO Trial
Resource

| 09 July 2019

IMAP statement on the ECHO trial

The body of evidence on possible increased risk of HIV acquisition with use of progestogen‑only contraception has remained mixed since 1991, with the greatest concern of an increased risk of HIV acquisition centred on the use of intramuscular depot‑medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA‑IM). Data on the risk of HIV acquisition and use of other highly effective contraceptives such as norethisterone enanthate (NET‑EN), hormonal implants, and hormonal and non‑hormonal IUDs are limited.2 And there are no data on subcutaneous DMPA (DMPA‑SC) and HIV risk.  In 2016, an updated systematic review of epidemiological evidence on hormonal contraception and HIV acquisition concluded that there was a significant association between the use of DMPA and HIV acquisition and no increased HIV risk with oral contraceptive pills.3 The updated systematic review provided important data regarding DMPA users at high risk of HIV; however, confounding in these observational data could not be excluded. The historically mixed data and the need to control for confounding required further investigation into the association between use of progestogen‑only injectables and increased risk of HIV acquisition, using a more robust research design. This led to the development of the Evidence for Contraceptive Options and HIV Outcomes (ECHO) trial.  

IMAP Statement ECHO Trial
Resource

| 09 July 2019

IMAP statement on the ECHO trial

The body of evidence on possible increased risk of HIV acquisition with use of progestogen‑only contraception has remained mixed since 1991, with the greatest concern of an increased risk of HIV acquisition centred on the use of intramuscular depot‑medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA‑IM). Data on the risk of HIV acquisition and use of other highly effective contraceptives such as norethisterone enanthate (NET‑EN), hormonal implants, and hormonal and non‑hormonal IUDs are limited.2 And there are no data on subcutaneous DMPA (DMPA‑SC) and HIV risk.  In 2016, an updated systematic review of epidemiological evidence on hormonal contraception and HIV acquisition concluded that there was a significant association between the use of DMPA and HIV acquisition and no increased HIV risk with oral contraceptive pills.3 The updated systematic review provided important data regarding DMPA users at high risk of HIV; however, confounding in these observational data could not be excluded. The historically mixed data and the need to control for confounding required further investigation into the association between use of progestogen‑only injectables and increased risk of HIV acquisition, using a more robust research design. This led to the development of the Evidence for Contraceptive Options and HIV Outcomes (ECHO) trial.  

Floods in Belkuchi, Bangladesh
Resource

| 03 April 2019

Improving the quality and availability of post-abortion care in a humanitarian crisis

The world is facing stronger and longer natural disasters, protracted complex emergencies, conflicts and epidemics. These humanitarian crises can expose weakness in health systems, with particularly serious consequences for women and girls in need of reproductive health care. To improve the quality and availability of post‑abortion care during a flood, the University of Leicester and International Planned Parenthood Federation South Asia Region (IPPF-SAR), in collaboration with the Government of Bangladesh, developed and measured the impact of an integrated intervention package, called RHCC. First tested in a flood-prone area of Bangladesh, this novel approach includes: i) Pre-positioning medicines and supplies, using the UNFPA’s Inter-Agency Reproductive Health Kit 8; ii) Capacity building of service providers; and iii) Community awareness raising. Supported by IPPF's Innovation Programme, the project aligns with IPPF’s commitment to ensuring that crisis-affected populations receive timely, quality, life-saving, gender-responsive and inclusive sexual and reproductive health services.  

Floods in Belkuchi, Bangladesh
Resource

| 03 April 2019

Improving the quality and availability of post-abortion care in a humanitarian crisis

The world is facing stronger and longer natural disasters, protracted complex emergencies, conflicts and epidemics. These humanitarian crises can expose weakness in health systems, with particularly serious consequences for women and girls in need of reproductive health care. To improve the quality and availability of post‑abortion care during a flood, the University of Leicester and International Planned Parenthood Federation South Asia Region (IPPF-SAR), in collaboration with the Government of Bangladesh, developed and measured the impact of an integrated intervention package, called RHCC. First tested in a flood-prone area of Bangladesh, this novel approach includes: i) Pre-positioning medicines and supplies, using the UNFPA’s Inter-Agency Reproductive Health Kit 8; ii) Capacity building of service providers; and iii) Community awareness raising. Supported by IPPF's Innovation Programme, the project aligns with IPPF’s commitment to ensuring that crisis-affected populations receive timely, quality, life-saving, gender-responsive and inclusive sexual and reproductive health services.  

IMAP statement SRH in Humanitarian settings
Resource

| 17 September 2018

IMAP statement on sexual and reproductive health in Humanitarian settings

Today, unprecedented numbers of people are living in a state of crisis or emergency. In 2018, it is estimated that 135.7 million people are in need of humanitarian assistance, with conflict and natural disasters predicted to be the biggest drivers. Of those in need, approximately one-quarter is estimated to be women and girls of reproductive age (aged 15–49) and approximately 5 million will be pregnant. Globally, 60% of preventable maternal deaths take place in settings of conflict, fragility, displacement and natural disasters.

IMAP statement SRH in Humanitarian settings
Resource

| 17 September 2018

IMAP statement on sexual and reproductive health in Humanitarian settings

Today, unprecedented numbers of people are living in a state of crisis or emergency. In 2018, it is estimated that 135.7 million people are in need of humanitarian assistance, with conflict and natural disasters predicted to be the biggest drivers. Of those in need, approximately one-quarter is estimated to be women and girls of reproductive age (aged 15–49) and approximately 5 million will be pregnant. Globally, 60% of preventable maternal deaths take place in settings of conflict, fragility, displacement and natural disasters.

dolutegravir (DTG)
Resource

| 02 August 2018

Technical brief: Dolutegravir for women living with HIV of reproductive age

In May 2018, the World Health Organization (WHO) reported a potential safety issue concerning dolutegravir (DTG), a common first-line antiretroviral treatment drug that is used to prevent and treat HIV infections. Preliminary findings from a study in Botswana found an increased risk of neural tube defects in infants born to women taking DTG at the time of conception. As a result of this study, WHO’s revised guidance on antiretroviral regimens for treating and preventing HIV infections, released in July 2018, include a caution on use of DTG by women and adolescent girls of childbearing potential. This brief aims to provide an overview of the research to date, current WHO guidance, and recommendations for IPPF.

dolutegravir (DTG)
Resource

| 02 August 2018

Technical brief: Dolutegravir for women living with HIV of reproductive age

In May 2018, the World Health Organization (WHO) reported a potential safety issue concerning dolutegravir (DTG), a common first-line antiretroviral treatment drug that is used to prevent and treat HIV infections. Preliminary findings from a study in Botswana found an increased risk of neural tube defects in infants born to women taking DTG at the time of conception. As a result of this study, WHO’s revised guidance on antiretroviral regimens for treating and preventing HIV infections, released in July 2018, include a caution on use of DTG by women and adolescent girls of childbearing potential. This brief aims to provide an overview of the research to date, current WHO guidance, and recommendations for IPPF.

Humanitarian strategy thumbnail
Resource

| 19 June 2018

Humanitarian Strategy

IPPF’s Strategic Framework (SF) 2016-2022 commits the organisation to lead a locally-owned globally connected movement that provides and enables services, and champions sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) for all. Increasing numbers of people face crises or live in chronically insecure settings. In recent years we have scaled up the number of sexual and reproductive health services and information provided to people in emergencies from 1.3m in 2013 to 3.2m in 2016, but we can do much more. The goal of this strategy is to improve access to life-saving SRHR for crisis-affected people in all their diversity. As the situation normalises after a crisis, we aim to leave behind stronger MAs sustaining quality services to diverse populations. IPPF’s model for SRHR in crisis connects the key elements of humanitarian action (prevention and preparedness, response, recovery and resilience) with long-term, equitable development. 

Humanitarian strategy thumbnail
Resource

| 19 June 2018

Humanitarian Strategy

IPPF’s Strategic Framework (SF) 2016-2022 commits the organisation to lead a locally-owned globally connected movement that provides and enables services, and champions sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) for all. Increasing numbers of people face crises or live in chronically insecure settings. In recent years we have scaled up the number of sexual and reproductive health services and information provided to people in emergencies from 1.3m in 2013 to 3.2m in 2016, but we can do much more. The goal of this strategy is to improve access to life-saving SRHR for crisis-affected people in all their diversity. As the situation normalises after a crisis, we aim to leave behind stronger MAs sustaining quality services to diverse populations. IPPF’s model for SRHR in crisis connects the key elements of humanitarian action (prevention and preparedness, response, recovery and resilience) with long-term, equitable development. 

credits: UNFPA
Resource

| 24 September 2017

Global Sexual and Reproductive Health Package for Men and Adolescent Boys

The Global Sexual and Reproductive Health Service Package for Men and Adolescent Boys has been developed to support providers of sexual and reproductive health services. It aims to increase the range and quality of sexual and reproductive services provided that meet the specific and diverse needs of men and adolescents boys. It covers men and adolescent boys in all their diversity, and takes a positive approach to sexual and reproductive health, seeing this not just as the absence of disease, but the positive expression of one’s gender, sex and sexuality. Men have substantial sexual and reproductive health needs, including the need for contraception, prevention and treatment of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs), sexual dysfunction, infertility and male cancers. Yet these needs are often unfulfilled due to a combination of factors, including a lack of service availability, poor health-seeking behaviour among men, health facilities often not considered "male-friendly," and a lack of agreed standards for delivering clinical and preventative services to men and adolescent boys. 

credits: UNFPA
Resource

| 24 September 2017

Global Sexual and Reproductive Health Package for Men and Adolescent Boys

The Global Sexual and Reproductive Health Service Package for Men and Adolescent Boys has been developed to support providers of sexual and reproductive health services. It aims to increase the range and quality of sexual and reproductive services provided that meet the specific and diverse needs of men and adolescents boys. It covers men and adolescent boys in all their diversity, and takes a positive approach to sexual and reproductive health, seeing this not just as the absence of disease, but the positive expression of one’s gender, sex and sexuality. Men have substantial sexual and reproductive health needs, including the need for contraception, prevention and treatment of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs), sexual dysfunction, infertility and male cancers. Yet these needs are often unfulfilled due to a combination of factors, including a lack of service availability, poor health-seeking behaviour among men, health facilities often not considered "male-friendly," and a lack of agreed standards for delivering clinical and preventative services to men and adolescent boys. 

IMAP Statement ECHO Trial
Resource

| 09 July 2019

IMAP statement on the ECHO trial

The body of evidence on possible increased risk of HIV acquisition with use of progestogen‑only contraception has remained mixed since 1991, with the greatest concern of an increased risk of HIV acquisition centred on the use of intramuscular depot‑medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA‑IM). Data on the risk of HIV acquisition and use of other highly effective contraceptives such as norethisterone enanthate (NET‑EN), hormonal implants, and hormonal and non‑hormonal IUDs are limited.2 And there are no data on subcutaneous DMPA (DMPA‑SC) and HIV risk.  In 2016, an updated systematic review of epidemiological evidence on hormonal contraception and HIV acquisition concluded that there was a significant association between the use of DMPA and HIV acquisition and no increased HIV risk with oral contraceptive pills.3 The updated systematic review provided important data regarding DMPA users at high risk of HIV; however, confounding in these observational data could not be excluded. The historically mixed data and the need to control for confounding required further investigation into the association between use of progestogen‑only injectables and increased risk of HIV acquisition, using a more robust research design. This led to the development of the Evidence for Contraceptive Options and HIV Outcomes (ECHO) trial.  

IMAP Statement ECHO Trial
Resource

| 09 July 2019

IMAP statement on the ECHO trial

The body of evidence on possible increased risk of HIV acquisition with use of progestogen‑only contraception has remained mixed since 1991, with the greatest concern of an increased risk of HIV acquisition centred on the use of intramuscular depot‑medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA‑IM). Data on the risk of HIV acquisition and use of other highly effective contraceptives such as norethisterone enanthate (NET‑EN), hormonal implants, and hormonal and non‑hormonal IUDs are limited.2 And there are no data on subcutaneous DMPA (DMPA‑SC) and HIV risk.  In 2016, an updated systematic review of epidemiological evidence on hormonal contraception and HIV acquisition concluded that there was a significant association between the use of DMPA and HIV acquisition and no increased HIV risk with oral contraceptive pills.3 The updated systematic review provided important data regarding DMPA users at high risk of HIV; however, confounding in these observational data could not be excluded. The historically mixed data and the need to control for confounding required further investigation into the association between use of progestogen‑only injectables and increased risk of HIV acquisition, using a more robust research design. This led to the development of the Evidence for Contraceptive Options and HIV Outcomes (ECHO) trial.  

Floods in Belkuchi, Bangladesh
Resource

| 03 April 2019

Improving the quality and availability of post-abortion care in a humanitarian crisis

The world is facing stronger and longer natural disasters, protracted complex emergencies, conflicts and epidemics. These humanitarian crises can expose weakness in health systems, with particularly serious consequences for women and girls in need of reproductive health care. To improve the quality and availability of post‑abortion care during a flood, the University of Leicester and International Planned Parenthood Federation South Asia Region (IPPF-SAR), in collaboration with the Government of Bangladesh, developed and measured the impact of an integrated intervention package, called RHCC. First tested in a flood-prone area of Bangladesh, this novel approach includes: i) Pre-positioning medicines and supplies, using the UNFPA’s Inter-Agency Reproductive Health Kit 8; ii) Capacity building of service providers; and iii) Community awareness raising. Supported by IPPF's Innovation Programme, the project aligns with IPPF’s commitment to ensuring that crisis-affected populations receive timely, quality, life-saving, gender-responsive and inclusive sexual and reproductive health services.  

Floods in Belkuchi, Bangladesh
Resource

| 03 April 2019

Improving the quality and availability of post-abortion care in a humanitarian crisis

The world is facing stronger and longer natural disasters, protracted complex emergencies, conflicts and epidemics. These humanitarian crises can expose weakness in health systems, with particularly serious consequences for women and girls in need of reproductive health care. To improve the quality and availability of post‑abortion care during a flood, the University of Leicester and International Planned Parenthood Federation South Asia Region (IPPF-SAR), in collaboration with the Government of Bangladesh, developed and measured the impact of an integrated intervention package, called RHCC. First tested in a flood-prone area of Bangladesh, this novel approach includes: i) Pre-positioning medicines and supplies, using the UNFPA’s Inter-Agency Reproductive Health Kit 8; ii) Capacity building of service providers; and iii) Community awareness raising. Supported by IPPF's Innovation Programme, the project aligns with IPPF’s commitment to ensuring that crisis-affected populations receive timely, quality, life-saving, gender-responsive and inclusive sexual and reproductive health services.  

IMAP statement SRH in Humanitarian settings
Resource

| 17 September 2018

IMAP statement on sexual and reproductive health in Humanitarian settings

Today, unprecedented numbers of people are living in a state of crisis or emergency. In 2018, it is estimated that 135.7 million people are in need of humanitarian assistance, with conflict and natural disasters predicted to be the biggest drivers. Of those in need, approximately one-quarter is estimated to be women and girls of reproductive age (aged 15–49) and approximately 5 million will be pregnant. Globally, 60% of preventable maternal deaths take place in settings of conflict, fragility, displacement and natural disasters.

IMAP statement SRH in Humanitarian settings
Resource

| 17 September 2018

IMAP statement on sexual and reproductive health in Humanitarian settings

Today, unprecedented numbers of people are living in a state of crisis or emergency. In 2018, it is estimated that 135.7 million people are in need of humanitarian assistance, with conflict and natural disasters predicted to be the biggest drivers. Of those in need, approximately one-quarter is estimated to be women and girls of reproductive age (aged 15–49) and approximately 5 million will be pregnant. Globally, 60% of preventable maternal deaths take place in settings of conflict, fragility, displacement and natural disasters.

dolutegravir (DTG)
Resource

| 02 August 2018

Technical brief: Dolutegravir for women living with HIV of reproductive age

In May 2018, the World Health Organization (WHO) reported a potential safety issue concerning dolutegravir (DTG), a common first-line antiretroviral treatment drug that is used to prevent and treat HIV infections. Preliminary findings from a study in Botswana found an increased risk of neural tube defects in infants born to women taking DTG at the time of conception. As a result of this study, WHO’s revised guidance on antiretroviral regimens for treating and preventing HIV infections, released in July 2018, include a caution on use of DTG by women and adolescent girls of childbearing potential. This brief aims to provide an overview of the research to date, current WHO guidance, and recommendations for IPPF.

dolutegravir (DTG)
Resource

| 02 August 2018

Technical brief: Dolutegravir for women living with HIV of reproductive age

In May 2018, the World Health Organization (WHO) reported a potential safety issue concerning dolutegravir (DTG), a common first-line antiretroviral treatment drug that is used to prevent and treat HIV infections. Preliminary findings from a study in Botswana found an increased risk of neural tube defects in infants born to women taking DTG at the time of conception. As a result of this study, WHO’s revised guidance on antiretroviral regimens for treating and preventing HIV infections, released in July 2018, include a caution on use of DTG by women and adolescent girls of childbearing potential. This brief aims to provide an overview of the research to date, current WHO guidance, and recommendations for IPPF.

Humanitarian strategy thumbnail
Resource

| 19 June 2018

Humanitarian Strategy

IPPF’s Strategic Framework (SF) 2016-2022 commits the organisation to lead a locally-owned globally connected movement that provides and enables services, and champions sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) for all. Increasing numbers of people face crises or live in chronically insecure settings. In recent years we have scaled up the number of sexual and reproductive health services and information provided to people in emergencies from 1.3m in 2013 to 3.2m in 2016, but we can do much more. The goal of this strategy is to improve access to life-saving SRHR for crisis-affected people in all their diversity. As the situation normalises after a crisis, we aim to leave behind stronger MAs sustaining quality services to diverse populations. IPPF’s model for SRHR in crisis connects the key elements of humanitarian action (prevention and preparedness, response, recovery and resilience) with long-term, equitable development. 

Humanitarian strategy thumbnail
Resource

| 19 June 2018

Humanitarian Strategy

IPPF’s Strategic Framework (SF) 2016-2022 commits the organisation to lead a locally-owned globally connected movement that provides and enables services, and champions sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) for all. Increasing numbers of people face crises or live in chronically insecure settings. In recent years we have scaled up the number of sexual and reproductive health services and information provided to people in emergencies from 1.3m in 2013 to 3.2m in 2016, but we can do much more. The goal of this strategy is to improve access to life-saving SRHR for crisis-affected people in all their diversity. As the situation normalises after a crisis, we aim to leave behind stronger MAs sustaining quality services to diverse populations. IPPF’s model for SRHR in crisis connects the key elements of humanitarian action (prevention and preparedness, response, recovery and resilience) with long-term, equitable development. 

credits: UNFPA
Resource

| 24 September 2017

Global Sexual and Reproductive Health Package for Men and Adolescent Boys

The Global Sexual and Reproductive Health Service Package for Men and Adolescent Boys has been developed to support providers of sexual and reproductive health services. It aims to increase the range and quality of sexual and reproductive services provided that meet the specific and diverse needs of men and adolescents boys. It covers men and adolescent boys in all their diversity, and takes a positive approach to sexual and reproductive health, seeing this not just as the absence of disease, but the positive expression of one’s gender, sex and sexuality. Men have substantial sexual and reproductive health needs, including the need for contraception, prevention and treatment of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs), sexual dysfunction, infertility and male cancers. Yet these needs are often unfulfilled due to a combination of factors, including a lack of service availability, poor health-seeking behaviour among men, health facilities often not considered "male-friendly," and a lack of agreed standards for delivering clinical and preventative services to men and adolescent boys. 

credits: UNFPA
Resource

| 24 September 2017

Global Sexual and Reproductive Health Package for Men and Adolescent Boys

The Global Sexual and Reproductive Health Service Package for Men and Adolescent Boys has been developed to support providers of sexual and reproductive health services. It aims to increase the range and quality of sexual and reproductive services provided that meet the specific and diverse needs of men and adolescents boys. It covers men and adolescent boys in all their diversity, and takes a positive approach to sexual and reproductive health, seeing this not just as the absence of disease, but the positive expression of one’s gender, sex and sexuality. Men have substantial sexual and reproductive health needs, including the need for contraception, prevention and treatment of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs), sexual dysfunction, infertility and male cancers. Yet these needs are often unfulfilled due to a combination of factors, including a lack of service availability, poor health-seeking behaviour among men, health facilities often not considered "male-friendly," and a lack of agreed standards for delivering clinical and preventative services to men and adolescent boys.