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A selection of stories from across the Federation

Humanitarian response team, Fiji.
Story

In pictures: Humanitarian photographers share their experiences of storytelling in the field

IPPF’s localized approach to humanitarian emergencies is led by our Member Associations' response teams and whenever possible, we deploy local photographers.
チピリ・ムレムフウェさん。資金が途絶えるまで、IPPFザンビア(PPAZ)が実施するUSAIDオープンドア・プロジェクトのサービスデリバリー・マネージャーを務めていた
story

| 08 August 2018

“We are losing precious time"

In November 2017,  Planned Parenthood Association of Zambia (PPAZ) received the news that they must cease all USAID funded programmes. The stop order was a result of the 'Global Gag Rule' (GGR), also referred to as the Mexico City Policy. The reinstatement of the policy has resulted in Planned Parenthood Association of Zambia losing 46% of its funding. You can learn more about the Global Gag Rule here. “When I lost my job as service delivery manager [at PPAZ USAID's Open Doors project], I felt like a part of me had died, I’m very passionate about this. I look forward to seeing a day where everybody will be free to access health services without stigma and discrimination, especially public health facilities. That’s what I’d like to see, [I] want to see integrated services, being provided to key populations, without stigma and discrimination, and fear of being arrested." The Global Gag Rule The reinstatement of the ‘Global Gag Rule’ resulted in the termination of Planned Parenthood Association of Zambia grant for the USAID Open Doors being terminated.  Chipili says “We didn’t expect its implementation to come with the termination of the grants suddenly. We thought that we were going to be given time, a year, one year to work and complete the project and hand over to the partner that was going to take over the responsibilities that Planned Parenthood Association of Zambia handled.” The termination of the project means progress that has been made, especially the work done to help reduce the number of HIV and STIs cases among the key populations will be undone. Progress, that is desperately needed to meet Zambia’s targets on HIV reduction. “We are losing precious time. We have got targets to meet as a nation, we need to ensure that by 2020 we reach the 90/90 goals, set by UNAIDS, and also the country has a broader vision of eliminating the threat of HIV, HIV as a public threat by 2030. So if we have such stumbling blocks, then the targets might not be met.  And then these key populations are also linked with the general population, we have men who sex with men, they also have partners, some of them are married, and if we don’t get into their networks, HIV and STIs will end up in the general population, therefore putting everybody at risk." Other impacts have been the increased vulnerability and the lost investment of peer promoters from the key populations and loss of safety and security that was provided by the organization.  Loss of safety and security “For safety and security, key populations cannot freely go to facilities they don’t know very well. The clinic setup was the most ideal set up for them. No one would question them, because this is open to everybody. But now what the project is doing, they are renting houses, the USAID is renting houses where they are providing services, so a house is very different from a clinic, that also affects the element of sustainability. The element of sustainability has also been lost because PPAZ has been here for a long time, since 1972, so we were hoping that the project was going to build the capacity for PPAZ to continue providing services to key populations that are free from stigma and discrimination. That has been lost. To me it’s a lost opportunity.” The Zambia National AIDS/HIV Strategic Framework for 2017 to 2021, bears a strong emphasis on leaving no one behind when it comes to stopping the HIV/AIDS epidemic. “No one should be left behind, if we are to reduce HIV infections to zero, if this is not done, the dream, the vision will not be achieved, we cannot afford to start pointing fingers, we have to use the public health approach and eliminate the risk of HIV infection amidst our people”.

チピリ・ムレムフウェさん。資金が途絶えるまで、IPPFザンビア(PPAZ)が実施するUSAIDオープンドア・プロジェクトのサービスデリバリー・マネージャーを務めていた
story

| 02 December 2022

“We are losing precious time"

In November 2017,  Planned Parenthood Association of Zambia (PPAZ) received the news that they must cease all USAID funded programmes. The stop order was a result of the 'Global Gag Rule' (GGR), also referred to as the Mexico City Policy. The reinstatement of the policy has resulted in Planned Parenthood Association of Zambia losing 46% of its funding. You can learn more about the Global Gag Rule here. “When I lost my job as service delivery manager [at PPAZ USAID's Open Doors project], I felt like a part of me had died, I’m very passionate about this. I look forward to seeing a day where everybody will be free to access health services without stigma and discrimination, especially public health facilities. That’s what I’d like to see, [I] want to see integrated services, being provided to key populations, without stigma and discrimination, and fear of being arrested." The Global Gag Rule The reinstatement of the ‘Global Gag Rule’ resulted in the termination of Planned Parenthood Association of Zambia grant for the USAID Open Doors being terminated.  Chipili says “We didn’t expect its implementation to come with the termination of the grants suddenly. We thought that we were going to be given time, a year, one year to work and complete the project and hand over to the partner that was going to take over the responsibilities that Planned Parenthood Association of Zambia handled.” The termination of the project means progress that has been made, especially the work done to help reduce the number of HIV and STIs cases among the key populations will be undone. Progress, that is desperately needed to meet Zambia’s targets on HIV reduction. “We are losing precious time. We have got targets to meet as a nation, we need to ensure that by 2020 we reach the 90/90 goals, set by UNAIDS, and also the country has a broader vision of eliminating the threat of HIV, HIV as a public threat by 2030. So if we have such stumbling blocks, then the targets might not be met.  And then these key populations are also linked with the general population, we have men who sex with men, they also have partners, some of them are married, and if we don’t get into their networks, HIV and STIs will end up in the general population, therefore putting everybody at risk." Other impacts have been the increased vulnerability and the lost investment of peer promoters from the key populations and loss of safety and security that was provided by the organization.  Loss of safety and security “For safety and security, key populations cannot freely go to facilities they don’t know very well. The clinic setup was the most ideal set up for them. No one would question them, because this is open to everybody. But now what the project is doing, they are renting houses, the USAID is renting houses where they are providing services, so a house is very different from a clinic, that also affects the element of sustainability. The element of sustainability has also been lost because PPAZ has been here for a long time, since 1972, so we were hoping that the project was going to build the capacity for PPAZ to continue providing services to key populations that are free from stigma and discrimination. That has been lost. To me it’s a lost opportunity.” The Zambia National AIDS/HIV Strategic Framework for 2017 to 2021, bears a strong emphasis on leaving no one behind when it comes to stopping the HIV/AIDS epidemic. “No one should be left behind, if we are to reduce HIV infections to zero, if this is not done, the dream, the vision will not be achieved, we cannot afford to start pointing fingers, we have to use the public health approach and eliminate the risk of HIV infection amidst our people”.

Thomas, 34 years old, former PPAZ peer educator and counsellor
story

| 08 August 2018

"The community really appreciated the services we were offering"

In November 2017,  Planned Parenthood Association of Zambia (PPAZ) received the news that they must cease all USAID funded programmes. The stop order was a result of the 'Global Gag Rule' (GGR), also referred to as the Mexico City Policy. The reinstatement of the policy has resulted in Planned Parenthood Association of Zambia losing 46% of its funding. You can learn more about the Global Gag Rule here. "My name is Thomas, I’m 34 years old. At PPAZ I worked as a peer educator and counsellor, I used to work on the outreach programmes in the community to offer access to health services like voluntary counselling and testing, we also used to sensitize women on the importance of family planning. We also used to refer women we would find had different problems, to the facilities so they can access health services. We also used to help by giving information on things like HIV prevention and signs and symptoms to look out for.  At other times, since the places were very far, we would take the services from the facilities to where the people were, so PPAZ used to help us do that.  I was at the clinic when they came to tell us that PPAZ would no longer be involved in the project because the funding had been stopped. It was a challenge for us because the services that people had become accustomed to in the communities, HIV counselling and testing services levels reduced because we couldn’t manage to go and take these services to them in the places where they live.  When we worked with PPAZ we used to put condoms in these places for them, in the bars and taverns, and even pool tables. Now that PPAZ is gone, the government cannot meet the supply of condoms needed in these places, even the services can’t be offered on the same scale. Unable to meet needs in rural areas Like you can see here, I look after my grandmother and other family members and that money [peer educators' allowance] used to go a long way in helping us look after our children and buy food, and other things. At the moment it is very difficult. Nyangwena is a very big place, it also includes 14 villages, so there are many people in this area. With the money that we were given through PPAZ, my friend and I would manage to get tyres for a bicycle and go to these places, we’d cycle distances as far as 14Km away. It was very helpful; the community really appreciated the services we were offering because we used to take them to the people. We would be very happy if PPAZ were to start them again because we would really help our communities a great deal with these services. Even school children would go and access them, at the youth-friendly corner twice a week. Information is really needed amongst these school children."

Thomas, 34 years old, former PPAZ peer educator and counsellor
story

| 02 December 2022

"The community really appreciated the services we were offering"

In November 2017,  Planned Parenthood Association of Zambia (PPAZ) received the news that they must cease all USAID funded programmes. The stop order was a result of the 'Global Gag Rule' (GGR), also referred to as the Mexico City Policy. The reinstatement of the policy has resulted in Planned Parenthood Association of Zambia losing 46% of its funding. You can learn more about the Global Gag Rule here. "My name is Thomas, I’m 34 years old. At PPAZ I worked as a peer educator and counsellor, I used to work on the outreach programmes in the community to offer access to health services like voluntary counselling and testing, we also used to sensitize women on the importance of family planning. We also used to refer women we would find had different problems, to the facilities so they can access health services. We also used to help by giving information on things like HIV prevention and signs and symptoms to look out for.  At other times, since the places were very far, we would take the services from the facilities to where the people were, so PPAZ used to help us do that.  I was at the clinic when they came to tell us that PPAZ would no longer be involved in the project because the funding had been stopped. It was a challenge for us because the services that people had become accustomed to in the communities, HIV counselling and testing services levels reduced because we couldn’t manage to go and take these services to them in the places where they live.  When we worked with PPAZ we used to put condoms in these places for them, in the bars and taverns, and even pool tables. Now that PPAZ is gone, the government cannot meet the supply of condoms needed in these places, even the services can’t be offered on the same scale. Unable to meet needs in rural areas Like you can see here, I look after my grandmother and other family members and that money [peer educators' allowance] used to go a long way in helping us look after our children and buy food, and other things. At the moment it is very difficult. Nyangwena is a very big place, it also includes 14 villages, so there are many people in this area. With the money that we were given through PPAZ, my friend and I would manage to get tyres for a bicycle and go to these places, we’d cycle distances as far as 14Km away. It was very helpful; the community really appreciated the services we were offering because we used to take them to the people. We would be very happy if PPAZ were to start them again because we would really help our communities a great deal with these services. Even school children would go and access them, at the youth-friendly corner twice a week. Information is really needed amongst these school children."

Joyce, HIV positive and PPAZ client
story

| 08 August 2018

"If I hadn’t come at that time to get help I would have been seriously ill"

In November 2017,  Planned Parenthood Association of Zambia (PPAZ) received the news that they must cease all USAID funded programmes. The stop order was a result of the 'Global Gag Rule' (GGR), also referred to as the Mexico City Policy. The reinstatement of the policy has resulted in Planned Parenthood Association of Zambia losing 46% of its funding. You can learn more about the Global Gag Rule here. “My name is Joyce. I live in Sopoloyi with my grandmother. I tested positive for HIV, around November, but was doubtful about starting treatment. I stayed away for three months and came back in January, to retest, when they asked if I wanted to start treatment right away, I refused, because I wasn’t ready.  I told my sister what happened and explained that I had tested positive for HIV, so she advised me to go back and start treatment as soon as possible, because the longer I waited the more I was wasting away.   I returned to the clinic and I was given medication for two weeks. I was changed and put on another course for a month. I would go back every two weeks to get medication, then gradually I was given a course for two months. From the time I commenced treatment till now, there’s a clear difference, my body is slowly coming back to normal. I felt very safe, I was happy that they protected me, if I hadn’t come at that time to get help I would have been seriously ill, the medication wouldn’t have helped me at all, but now I have been on medication I feel much better and my body is also getting better. They are still giving me medication. They need to continue giving us the medicines and the information, because at least they tell us that once we start we are not supposed to skip any dose, even when you feel fit, you can’t stop because the virus multiplies everyday by a thousand, so the more you take your medication it keeps the virus levels low, so I would say they need to continue. All I am asking is that they don’t stop giving us this treatment because a lot of people will suffer or even die without these medicines.”

Joyce, HIV positive and PPAZ client
story

| 02 December 2022

"If I hadn’t come at that time to get help I would have been seriously ill"

In November 2017,  Planned Parenthood Association of Zambia (PPAZ) received the news that they must cease all USAID funded programmes. The stop order was a result of the 'Global Gag Rule' (GGR), also referred to as the Mexico City Policy. The reinstatement of the policy has resulted in Planned Parenthood Association of Zambia losing 46% of its funding. You can learn more about the Global Gag Rule here. “My name is Joyce. I live in Sopoloyi with my grandmother. I tested positive for HIV, around November, but was doubtful about starting treatment. I stayed away for three months and came back in January, to retest, when they asked if I wanted to start treatment right away, I refused, because I wasn’t ready.  I told my sister what happened and explained that I had tested positive for HIV, so she advised me to go back and start treatment as soon as possible, because the longer I waited the more I was wasting away.   I returned to the clinic and I was given medication for two weeks. I was changed and put on another course for a month. I would go back every two weeks to get medication, then gradually I was given a course for two months. From the time I commenced treatment till now, there’s a clear difference, my body is slowly coming back to normal. I felt very safe, I was happy that they protected me, if I hadn’t come at that time to get help I would have been seriously ill, the medication wouldn’t have helped me at all, but now I have been on medication I feel much better and my body is also getting better. They are still giving me medication. They need to continue giving us the medicines and the information, because at least they tell us that once we start we are not supposed to skip any dose, even when you feel fit, you can’t stop because the virus multiplies everyday by a thousand, so the more you take your medication it keeps the virus levels low, so I would say they need to continue. All I am asking is that they don’t stop giving us this treatment because a lot of people will suffer or even die without these medicines.”

チピリ・ムレムフウェさん。資金が途絶えるまで、IPPFザンビア(PPAZ)が実施するUSAIDオープンドア・プロジェクトのサービスデリバリー・マネージャーを務めていた
story

| 08 August 2018

“We are losing precious time"

In November 2017,  Planned Parenthood Association of Zambia (PPAZ) received the news that they must cease all USAID funded programmes. The stop order was a result of the 'Global Gag Rule' (GGR), also referred to as the Mexico City Policy. The reinstatement of the policy has resulted in Planned Parenthood Association of Zambia losing 46% of its funding. You can learn more about the Global Gag Rule here. “When I lost my job as service delivery manager [at PPAZ USAID's Open Doors project], I felt like a part of me had died, I’m very passionate about this. I look forward to seeing a day where everybody will be free to access health services without stigma and discrimination, especially public health facilities. That’s what I’d like to see, [I] want to see integrated services, being provided to key populations, without stigma and discrimination, and fear of being arrested." The Global Gag Rule The reinstatement of the ‘Global Gag Rule’ resulted in the termination of Planned Parenthood Association of Zambia grant for the USAID Open Doors being terminated.  Chipili says “We didn’t expect its implementation to come with the termination of the grants suddenly. We thought that we were going to be given time, a year, one year to work and complete the project and hand over to the partner that was going to take over the responsibilities that Planned Parenthood Association of Zambia handled.” The termination of the project means progress that has been made, especially the work done to help reduce the number of HIV and STIs cases among the key populations will be undone. Progress, that is desperately needed to meet Zambia’s targets on HIV reduction. “We are losing precious time. We have got targets to meet as a nation, we need to ensure that by 2020 we reach the 90/90 goals, set by UNAIDS, and also the country has a broader vision of eliminating the threat of HIV, HIV as a public threat by 2030. So if we have such stumbling blocks, then the targets might not be met.  And then these key populations are also linked with the general population, we have men who sex with men, they also have partners, some of them are married, and if we don’t get into their networks, HIV and STIs will end up in the general population, therefore putting everybody at risk." Other impacts have been the increased vulnerability and the lost investment of peer promoters from the key populations and loss of safety and security that was provided by the organization.  Loss of safety and security “For safety and security, key populations cannot freely go to facilities they don’t know very well. The clinic setup was the most ideal set up for them. No one would question them, because this is open to everybody. But now what the project is doing, they are renting houses, the USAID is renting houses where they are providing services, so a house is very different from a clinic, that also affects the element of sustainability. The element of sustainability has also been lost because PPAZ has been here for a long time, since 1972, so we were hoping that the project was going to build the capacity for PPAZ to continue providing services to key populations that are free from stigma and discrimination. That has been lost. To me it’s a lost opportunity.” The Zambia National AIDS/HIV Strategic Framework for 2017 to 2021, bears a strong emphasis on leaving no one behind when it comes to stopping the HIV/AIDS epidemic. “No one should be left behind, if we are to reduce HIV infections to zero, if this is not done, the dream, the vision will not be achieved, we cannot afford to start pointing fingers, we have to use the public health approach and eliminate the risk of HIV infection amidst our people”.

チピリ・ムレムフウェさん。資金が途絶えるまで、IPPFザンビア(PPAZ)が実施するUSAIDオープンドア・プロジェクトのサービスデリバリー・マネージャーを務めていた
story

| 02 December 2022

“We are losing precious time"

In November 2017,  Planned Parenthood Association of Zambia (PPAZ) received the news that they must cease all USAID funded programmes. The stop order was a result of the 'Global Gag Rule' (GGR), also referred to as the Mexico City Policy. The reinstatement of the policy has resulted in Planned Parenthood Association of Zambia losing 46% of its funding. You can learn more about the Global Gag Rule here. “When I lost my job as service delivery manager [at PPAZ USAID's Open Doors project], I felt like a part of me had died, I’m very passionate about this. I look forward to seeing a day where everybody will be free to access health services without stigma and discrimination, especially public health facilities. That’s what I’d like to see, [I] want to see integrated services, being provided to key populations, without stigma and discrimination, and fear of being arrested." The Global Gag Rule The reinstatement of the ‘Global Gag Rule’ resulted in the termination of Planned Parenthood Association of Zambia grant for the USAID Open Doors being terminated.  Chipili says “We didn’t expect its implementation to come with the termination of the grants suddenly. We thought that we were going to be given time, a year, one year to work and complete the project and hand over to the partner that was going to take over the responsibilities that Planned Parenthood Association of Zambia handled.” The termination of the project means progress that has been made, especially the work done to help reduce the number of HIV and STIs cases among the key populations will be undone. Progress, that is desperately needed to meet Zambia’s targets on HIV reduction. “We are losing precious time. We have got targets to meet as a nation, we need to ensure that by 2020 we reach the 90/90 goals, set by UNAIDS, and also the country has a broader vision of eliminating the threat of HIV, HIV as a public threat by 2030. So if we have such stumbling blocks, then the targets might not be met.  And then these key populations are also linked with the general population, we have men who sex with men, they also have partners, some of them are married, and if we don’t get into their networks, HIV and STIs will end up in the general population, therefore putting everybody at risk." Other impacts have been the increased vulnerability and the lost investment of peer promoters from the key populations and loss of safety and security that was provided by the organization.  Loss of safety and security “For safety and security, key populations cannot freely go to facilities they don’t know very well. The clinic setup was the most ideal set up for them. No one would question them, because this is open to everybody. But now what the project is doing, they are renting houses, the USAID is renting houses where they are providing services, so a house is very different from a clinic, that also affects the element of sustainability. The element of sustainability has also been lost because PPAZ has been here for a long time, since 1972, so we were hoping that the project was going to build the capacity for PPAZ to continue providing services to key populations that are free from stigma and discrimination. That has been lost. To me it’s a lost opportunity.” The Zambia National AIDS/HIV Strategic Framework for 2017 to 2021, bears a strong emphasis on leaving no one behind when it comes to stopping the HIV/AIDS epidemic. “No one should be left behind, if we are to reduce HIV infections to zero, if this is not done, the dream, the vision will not be achieved, we cannot afford to start pointing fingers, we have to use the public health approach and eliminate the risk of HIV infection amidst our people”.

Thomas, 34 years old, former PPAZ peer educator and counsellor
story

| 08 August 2018

"The community really appreciated the services we were offering"

In November 2017,  Planned Parenthood Association of Zambia (PPAZ) received the news that they must cease all USAID funded programmes. The stop order was a result of the 'Global Gag Rule' (GGR), also referred to as the Mexico City Policy. The reinstatement of the policy has resulted in Planned Parenthood Association of Zambia losing 46% of its funding. You can learn more about the Global Gag Rule here. "My name is Thomas, I’m 34 years old. At PPAZ I worked as a peer educator and counsellor, I used to work on the outreach programmes in the community to offer access to health services like voluntary counselling and testing, we also used to sensitize women on the importance of family planning. We also used to refer women we would find had different problems, to the facilities so they can access health services. We also used to help by giving information on things like HIV prevention and signs and symptoms to look out for.  At other times, since the places were very far, we would take the services from the facilities to where the people were, so PPAZ used to help us do that.  I was at the clinic when they came to tell us that PPAZ would no longer be involved in the project because the funding had been stopped. It was a challenge for us because the services that people had become accustomed to in the communities, HIV counselling and testing services levels reduced because we couldn’t manage to go and take these services to them in the places where they live.  When we worked with PPAZ we used to put condoms in these places for them, in the bars and taverns, and even pool tables. Now that PPAZ is gone, the government cannot meet the supply of condoms needed in these places, even the services can’t be offered on the same scale. Unable to meet needs in rural areas Like you can see here, I look after my grandmother and other family members and that money [peer educators' allowance] used to go a long way in helping us look after our children and buy food, and other things. At the moment it is very difficult. Nyangwena is a very big place, it also includes 14 villages, so there are many people in this area. With the money that we were given through PPAZ, my friend and I would manage to get tyres for a bicycle and go to these places, we’d cycle distances as far as 14Km away. It was very helpful; the community really appreciated the services we were offering because we used to take them to the people. We would be very happy if PPAZ were to start them again because we would really help our communities a great deal with these services. Even school children would go and access them, at the youth-friendly corner twice a week. Information is really needed amongst these school children."

Thomas, 34 years old, former PPAZ peer educator and counsellor
story

| 02 December 2022

"The community really appreciated the services we were offering"

In November 2017,  Planned Parenthood Association of Zambia (PPAZ) received the news that they must cease all USAID funded programmes. The stop order was a result of the 'Global Gag Rule' (GGR), also referred to as the Mexico City Policy. The reinstatement of the policy has resulted in Planned Parenthood Association of Zambia losing 46% of its funding. You can learn more about the Global Gag Rule here. "My name is Thomas, I’m 34 years old. At PPAZ I worked as a peer educator and counsellor, I used to work on the outreach programmes in the community to offer access to health services like voluntary counselling and testing, we also used to sensitize women on the importance of family planning. We also used to refer women we would find had different problems, to the facilities so they can access health services. We also used to help by giving information on things like HIV prevention and signs and symptoms to look out for.  At other times, since the places were very far, we would take the services from the facilities to where the people were, so PPAZ used to help us do that.  I was at the clinic when they came to tell us that PPAZ would no longer be involved in the project because the funding had been stopped. It was a challenge for us because the services that people had become accustomed to in the communities, HIV counselling and testing services levels reduced because we couldn’t manage to go and take these services to them in the places where they live.  When we worked with PPAZ we used to put condoms in these places for them, in the bars and taverns, and even pool tables. Now that PPAZ is gone, the government cannot meet the supply of condoms needed in these places, even the services can’t be offered on the same scale. Unable to meet needs in rural areas Like you can see here, I look after my grandmother and other family members and that money [peer educators' allowance] used to go a long way in helping us look after our children and buy food, and other things. At the moment it is very difficult. Nyangwena is a very big place, it also includes 14 villages, so there are many people in this area. With the money that we were given through PPAZ, my friend and I would manage to get tyres for a bicycle and go to these places, we’d cycle distances as far as 14Km away. It was very helpful; the community really appreciated the services we were offering because we used to take them to the people. We would be very happy if PPAZ were to start them again because we would really help our communities a great deal with these services. Even school children would go and access them, at the youth-friendly corner twice a week. Information is really needed amongst these school children."

Joyce, HIV positive and PPAZ client
story

| 08 August 2018

"If I hadn’t come at that time to get help I would have been seriously ill"

In November 2017,  Planned Parenthood Association of Zambia (PPAZ) received the news that they must cease all USAID funded programmes. The stop order was a result of the 'Global Gag Rule' (GGR), also referred to as the Mexico City Policy. The reinstatement of the policy has resulted in Planned Parenthood Association of Zambia losing 46% of its funding. You can learn more about the Global Gag Rule here. “My name is Joyce. I live in Sopoloyi with my grandmother. I tested positive for HIV, around November, but was doubtful about starting treatment. I stayed away for three months and came back in January, to retest, when they asked if I wanted to start treatment right away, I refused, because I wasn’t ready.  I told my sister what happened and explained that I had tested positive for HIV, so she advised me to go back and start treatment as soon as possible, because the longer I waited the more I was wasting away.   I returned to the clinic and I was given medication for two weeks. I was changed and put on another course for a month. I would go back every two weeks to get medication, then gradually I was given a course for two months. From the time I commenced treatment till now, there’s a clear difference, my body is slowly coming back to normal. I felt very safe, I was happy that they protected me, if I hadn’t come at that time to get help I would have been seriously ill, the medication wouldn’t have helped me at all, but now I have been on medication I feel much better and my body is also getting better. They are still giving me medication. They need to continue giving us the medicines and the information, because at least they tell us that once we start we are not supposed to skip any dose, even when you feel fit, you can’t stop because the virus multiplies everyday by a thousand, so the more you take your medication it keeps the virus levels low, so I would say they need to continue. All I am asking is that they don’t stop giving us this treatment because a lot of people will suffer or even die without these medicines.”

Joyce, HIV positive and PPAZ client
story

| 02 December 2022

"If I hadn’t come at that time to get help I would have been seriously ill"

In November 2017,  Planned Parenthood Association of Zambia (PPAZ) received the news that they must cease all USAID funded programmes. The stop order was a result of the 'Global Gag Rule' (GGR), also referred to as the Mexico City Policy. The reinstatement of the policy has resulted in Planned Parenthood Association of Zambia losing 46% of its funding. You can learn more about the Global Gag Rule here. “My name is Joyce. I live in Sopoloyi with my grandmother. I tested positive for HIV, around November, but was doubtful about starting treatment. I stayed away for three months and came back in January, to retest, when they asked if I wanted to start treatment right away, I refused, because I wasn’t ready.  I told my sister what happened and explained that I had tested positive for HIV, so she advised me to go back and start treatment as soon as possible, because the longer I waited the more I was wasting away.   I returned to the clinic and I was given medication for two weeks. I was changed and put on another course for a month. I would go back every two weeks to get medication, then gradually I was given a course for two months. From the time I commenced treatment till now, there’s a clear difference, my body is slowly coming back to normal. I felt very safe, I was happy that they protected me, if I hadn’t come at that time to get help I would have been seriously ill, the medication wouldn’t have helped me at all, but now I have been on medication I feel much better and my body is also getting better. They are still giving me medication. They need to continue giving us the medicines and the information, because at least they tell us that once we start we are not supposed to skip any dose, even when you feel fit, you can’t stop because the virus multiplies everyday by a thousand, so the more you take your medication it keeps the virus levels low, so I would say they need to continue. All I am asking is that they don’t stop giving us this treatment because a lot of people will suffer or even die without these medicines.”