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Stories

Latest stories from IPPF

Spotlight

A selection of stories from across the Federation

Humanitarian response team, Fiji.
Story

In pictures: Humanitarian photographers share their experiences of storytelling in the field

IPPF’s localized approach to humanitarian emergencies is led by our Member Associations' response teams and whenever possible, we deploy local photographers.
A couple affected by the floods in Sri Lanka
story

| 24 August 2017

How attending workshops can help equip parents with the tools to talk about sex

Prijani and Chandana were forced to flee their home during the floods of May 2017 in Sri Lanka. They didn’t have time to take any belongings, so ran with their two small children. After the floods, they attended gender based violence training run by Family Planning Association of Sri Lanka, where they learned about child protection needs. “We weren’t informed that the floods were going to come, but when the water reached our knee level we knew we have to move. We just took the kids and left” says Prijani. “I was worried about two things: my kids, as we were staying at a camp in the school, and losing my house. I allowed a workshop run by Family Planning Association of Sri Lanka to be held in my garden as we had the most room. There I learnt a lot about child protection the teacher gave a lot of examples of child protection and what can go wrong. We learned about sexual violence that kids face from older people”. “One day, I saw my son masturbating and I asked him how he knew how to do that, and that’s when he told me about what happened at school. The workshop taught me to look out for these signs” says Chandana, who is planning to report the incident to the school when it re-opens. “I never thought the issue was that bad. Now, we are a lot more attentive to our kids”.   Stories Read more stories from Sri Lanka

A couple affected by the floods in Sri Lanka
story

| 27 May 2022

How attending workshops can help equip parents with the tools to talk about sex

Prijani and Chandana were forced to flee their home during the floods of May 2017 in Sri Lanka. They didn’t have time to take any belongings, so ran with their two small children. After the floods, they attended gender based violence training run by Family Planning Association of Sri Lanka, where they learned about child protection needs. “We weren’t informed that the floods were going to come, but when the water reached our knee level we knew we have to move. We just took the kids and left” says Prijani. “I was worried about two things: my kids, as we were staying at a camp in the school, and losing my house. I allowed a workshop run by Family Planning Association of Sri Lanka to be held in my garden as we had the most room. There I learnt a lot about child protection the teacher gave a lot of examples of child protection and what can go wrong. We learned about sexual violence that kids face from older people”. “One day, I saw my son masturbating and I asked him how he knew how to do that, and that’s when he told me about what happened at school. The workshop taught me to look out for these signs” says Chandana, who is planning to report the incident to the school when it re-opens. “I never thought the issue was that bad. Now, we are a lot more attentive to our kids”.   Stories Read more stories from Sri Lanka

A couple affected by the floods in Sri Lanka
story

| 24 August 2017

How attending workshops can help equip parents with the tools to talk about sex

Prijani and Chandana were forced to flee their home during the floods of May 2017 in Sri Lanka. They didn’t have time to take any belongings, so ran with their two small children. After the floods, they attended gender based violence training run by Family Planning Association of Sri Lanka, where they learned about child protection needs. “We weren’t informed that the floods were going to come, but when the water reached our knee level we knew we have to move. We just took the kids and left” says Prijani. “I was worried about two things: my kids, as we were staying at a camp in the school, and losing my house. I allowed a workshop run by Family Planning Association of Sri Lanka to be held in my garden as we had the most room. There I learnt a lot about child protection the teacher gave a lot of examples of child protection and what can go wrong. We learned about sexual violence that kids face from older people”. “One day, I saw my son masturbating and I asked him how he knew how to do that, and that’s when he told me about what happened at school. The workshop taught me to look out for these signs” says Chandana, who is planning to report the incident to the school when it re-opens. “I never thought the issue was that bad. Now, we are a lot more attentive to our kids”.   Stories Read more stories from Sri Lanka

A couple affected by the floods in Sri Lanka
story

| 27 May 2022

How attending workshops can help equip parents with the tools to talk about sex

Prijani and Chandana were forced to flee their home during the floods of May 2017 in Sri Lanka. They didn’t have time to take any belongings, so ran with their two small children. After the floods, they attended gender based violence training run by Family Planning Association of Sri Lanka, where they learned about child protection needs. “We weren’t informed that the floods were going to come, but when the water reached our knee level we knew we have to move. We just took the kids and left” says Prijani. “I was worried about two things: my kids, as we were staying at a camp in the school, and losing my house. I allowed a workshop run by Family Planning Association of Sri Lanka to be held in my garden as we had the most room. There I learnt a lot about child protection the teacher gave a lot of examples of child protection and what can go wrong. We learned about sexual violence that kids face from older people”. “One day, I saw my son masturbating and I asked him how he knew how to do that, and that’s when he told me about what happened at school. The workshop taught me to look out for these signs” says Chandana, who is planning to report the incident to the school when it re-opens. “I never thought the issue was that bad. Now, we are a lot more attentive to our kids”.   Stories Read more stories from Sri Lanka