Stories

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Milan Khadka once suffered discrimination within his community when they found out he was living with HIV. He is now a community home-based care mobiliser with Family Planning Association of Nepal. He uses his music to educate the youth about HIV and to confront the stigma around HIV.
After being diagnosed with HIV, Lakshmi received training and information on HIV and has since dedicated her life to supporting people with HIV.
The UN estimates that 150,000 people are trafficked in South Asia each year, the few women and girls that are rescued return home and are diagnosed with HIV.
People diagnosed with HIV are often ostracised from their community and are faced with the threat of violence. Thanks to education classes ran by IPPF's Family Planning of Nepal, communities learn more about HIV and stop discriminating HIV positive people.m their community and are faced with the threat of violence.
“After the earthquake, there were so many problems. So many homes were destroyed. People are still living in temporary homes because they’re unable to rebuild their homes.” Pasang Tamang lives in Gatlang, high up in the mountains of northern Nepal, ...
The April 2015 earthquake in Nepal brought death and devastation to thousands of people – from which many are still recovering. But there was one positive outcome: after the earthquake, thousands of young people came forward to support those affected as volunteers.
IPPF volunteers in Nepal work to empower women with contraceptive choices that will benefit their lifestyle, and also work with husbands in the community to break down patriarchal attitudes that impact women's health.
There are an estimated 200,000 trafficked Nepali girls and women in Indian brothels. Sunita, 19, was trafficked to India when she was 17. Now, Sunita is sharing a mushroom farm financed by IPPF, and has high hopes for the future.