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“After the earthquake, there were so many problems. So many homes were destroyed. People are still living in temporary homes because they’re unable to rebuild their homes.” Pasang Tamang lives in Gatlang, high up in the mountains of northern Nepal, ...
Two years after the earthquake that struck Nepal in April 2015, the village of Gatlang in the country’s mountainous north still lies in partial ruin. Families are still living in temporary shelters, unable to afford the enormous cost of rebuilding their old home.
The April 2015 earthquake in Nepal brought death and devastation to thousands of people – from which many are still recovering. But there was one positive outcome: after the earthquake, thousands of young people came forward to support those affected as volunteers.
High up in the mountains of central northern Nepal, not far from the Tibetan border, lies the district of Rasuwa. The people here are mainly ethnic Tamang and Sherpa, two indigenous groups with cultural traditions stretching back centuries. But these rich cultural traditions can come hand-in-hand with severe social problems, compounded by entrenched poverty and very low literacy rates.
“People used to shout at me when I was distributing condoms. They called me many bad things.” Rita Chawal recalls her time as a family planning youth volunteer for the Family Planning Association of Nepal (FPAN), Nepal’s largest family planning organisation, running classes on sexual health, safe abortion and contraception.
“When I was about to give birth, we called for an ambulance or a vehicle to help but even after five hours of calling, no vehicle arrived.”
Cyclone Winston, which devastated Fiji, was the strongest to ever hit the South Pacific. IPPF’s humanitarian response there was carried out with our Member Association, the Reproductive & Family Health Association of Fiji, and is part of our SPRINT Initiative, ...
Jomini, from rural Nepal, was just 16 when her parents forced her to marry a man 8 years older than her. "I didn't know anything about the physical side" she says, but IPPF provided family planning.
After noticing women in his community suffering, he took the initiative of opening a family planning clinic within the village.
For millions of Nepali women, the only professional care they receive during pregnancy is from nurses and midwives, not doctors.