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When Hervé realized he had an STI, there was only one person he could turn to – peer educator Chariette. On her recommendation, he visited the Cameroon National Association for Family Welfare (CAMNAFAW). The care he received from the clinic inspired him to become a peer educator.
English language student Gertrude Zouakeu Noutcha's neighbor is a peer educator with the Cameroon National Planning Association for Family Welfare. When Gertrude needed advice on her relationship, her neighbor was there to help counsel them both. Her positive experience inspired her to become a peer educator.
Two years after the earthquake that struck Nepal in April 2015, the village of Gatlang in the country’s mountainous north still lies in partial ruin. Families are still living in temporary shelters, unable to afford the enormous cost of rebuilding their old home.
Cyclone Winston, which devastated Fiji, was the strongest to ever hit the South Pacific. IPPF’s humanitarian response there was carried out with our Member Association, the Reproductive & Family Health Association of Fiji, and is part of our SPRINT Initiative, ...
Jomini, from rural Nepal, was just 16 when her parents forced her to marry a man 8 years older than her. "I didn't know anything about the physical side" she says, but IPPF provided family planning.
After noticing women in his community suffering, he took the initiative of opening a family planning clinic within the village.
For millions of Nepali women, the only professional care they receive during pregnancy is from nurses and midwives, not doctors.
IPPF volunteers in Nepal work to empower women with contraceptive choices that will benefit their lifestyle, and also work with husbands in the community to break down patriarchal attitudes that impact women's health.