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The Moonlight Star Clinic in Bwaise, Kampala provides integrated HIV and contraceptive care to the local urban community including sex workers, migrants, and young people. An initiative run by Reproductive Health Uganda (RHU), the clinic offers care through evening outreach sessions, which were introduced to accommodate clients’ work schedules, making healthcare more accessible and convenient.
Dr Boyce has been committed to providing treatment and care to clients living with HIV for over 20 years. Dr. Boyce hopes to see HIV disclosure become as acceptable as other chronic illnesses such as cancer or diabetes, where an entire family would work towards caring for the affected person, instead of alienating them.
Public perceptions, lack of education and government policies contribute to the barriers and challenges to achieving equality for all. In a country as diverse as Trinidad and Tobago, this is especially acute for certain key populations including the LGBTI+ community.
Mariame Doumbia is a midwife who, provides family planning and sexual health services to Malians in and around the capital. Funding for her role was cut for some time because of the Global Gag Rule – but she's back to doing what she loves most: helping young people.
23-year-old Fatoumata joined the Youth Action Movement in 2018. Since then, she's been involved in projects to help young people understand their sexual rights and health. Periods, teenage pregnancy, female genital mutilation (FGM) – no topic is off-limits for Fatoumata.
In the rural part of Ethiopia where Rewda Kedir works as a midwife, only 14% of married women are using any method of contraception, despite many wanting to. Having open – if challenging – conversations with families is one way her clinic lets people know what their contraceptive options are.
Raising three children by herself, Lijana did not have time to think about her health. That was until she could no longe ignore the feeling that something was wrong. Through friends, she discovered the Albanian Centre of Population and Development (ACDP) clinic. It changed her life.
Eleanor's first cervical cancer screening came back negative. Three years later at her follow-up appointment, she expected the same negative result. Unfortunately, this time it was positive. Once she successfully completed her treatment, her experience turned her into an ardent activist for cervical cancer prevention in her community.
Through social media, 21-year-old Artemisa Seraj stumbled across a post from Aulona center, offering free workshops and seminars on sexual and reproductive healthcare. Curious to learn more about the 'taboo' subject, she attended a talk and was immediately convinced that she wanted to do more to empower women and girls in her community.
Hatixhe is a nurse at the Albanian Centre of Population and Development clinic. With 39 years of experience in gynaecology, she has seen vast improvements in access and services, and believes VIA and cryotherapy is a step further in the right direction for women's healthcare.