Stories

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Dr Boyce has been committed to providing treatment and care to clients living with HIV for over 20 years. Dr. Boyce hopes to see HIV disclosure become as acceptable as other chronic illnesses such as cancer or diabetes, where an entire family would work towards caring for the affected person, instead of alienating them.
Public perceptions, lack of education and government policies contribute to the barriers and challenges to achieving equality for all. In a country as diverse as Trinidad and Tobago, this is especially acute for certain key populations including the LGBTI+ community.
23-year-old Fatoumata joined the Youth Action Movement in 2018. Since then, she's been involved in projects to help young people understand their sexual rights and health. Periods, teenage pregnancy, female genital mutilation (FGM) – no topic is off-limits for Fatoumata.
Having to stop crucial HIV prevention work with immediate effect was quite a shock for Chipili Mulemfwe, former services delivery manager at the USAID Open doors project run by Planned Parenthood Association of Zambia.
34-year-old Thomas talks about the impact funding cuts have had on his role as a peer educator, and the reduction of outreach services within the wider community; particularly for those needing HIV health care.
When Joyce tested positive for HIV, she wasn't ready to start taking medication but with the help, guidance and support of Planned Parenthood Association of Zambia (PPAZ), she successfully started her treatment and began to feel happier about her situation. But now, the Global Gag Rule threatens her future.
Joseph talks about the challenges of accessing quality and confidential health care as a young gay man living in Botswana.
Jackie is a peer outreach worker who encourages local sex workers to attend the Nkaikela Youth Group where BOFWA nurses provide vital health care.
In pictures: local communities impacted by the loss of US funding for HIV outreach services.
It was the lure of something to eat and a free subway card that persuaded Manny Norman to visit Project Street Beat's 'Safety Counts sessions. From there he slowly began to regain control of his life, from rebuilding his family life to training as an HIV outreach worker. This is his story.