Stories

Displaying 1 - 10 of 46

This World Humanitarian Day we reflect on the incredible work undertaken by our humanitarian response teams over the last 12 months. Last year IPPF reached approximately 5.5 million people in humanitarian crises through our local Member Associations. This achievement would not have been possible without the dedicated and heroic healthcare teams providing vital sexual and reproductive healthcare in the most fragile humanitarian settings.
Dr Ratni is a fearless doctor, doting mother, and selfless volunteer. She is currently a member of an emergency response following a devastating 6.2 magnitude earthquake in Indonesia.
Women around the world have faced multiple barriers to accessing safe abortion care during the COVID-19 pandemic including the de-prioritization of sexual and reproductive healthcare, overwhelmed health systems and restrictions on movement. The COVID-19 crisis has sparked innovation among IPPF Member Associations who responded swiftly by developing new approaches to reach women with safe abortion care including telemedicine and home-based provision of medical abortion.
In early April 2020, the all too familiar destruction of a Tropical Cyclone (TC) – Harold – hit the Solomon Islands, Vanuatu, Fiji and Tonga. One of the worst affected areas was the Eastern part of Fiji.
In the rural part of Ethiopia where Rewda Kedir works as a midwife, only 14% of married women are using any method of contraception, despite many wanting to. Having open – if challenging – conversations with families is one way her clinic lets people know what their contraceptive options are.
Kiribati is one of the least developed countries in the Pacific with few natural resources, limited governance, institutional capacity, and infrastructure. Humanitarian crises are prevalent here, and the occurrence of extreme weather events is likely to increase due to the climate crisis as the sea levels rise and regularly flood coastal homes.
Meet some of the dedicated staff and volunteers working on the frontline during a global pandemic. Working tirelessly, our colleagues are ensuring women, men, young people and families continue to receive sexual and reproductive healthcare throughout cities and in remote communities.
Fatima is a midwife and has worked for the Palestinian Family Planning and Protection Agency for 18 years. Her work has not only positively impacted her community but also her personal life.
Amani is a 24 year old midwife and volunteer peer educator with the Palestinian Family Planning and Protection Agency. Her role as a volunteer involves her visiting schools to discuss sexual health in a climate that has many 'taboo' issues such as abortion and sex outside of marriage. This is her story.
Women and girls seeking an abortion face a number of barriers in accessing abortion care. Women like Khawla*, who with three children already and pre-existing health conditions, did not want to continue her pregnancy. Palestine Family Planning and Protection Agency (PFPPA), were there to help ensure she got the care and support she needed.