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Fatima is a midwife and has worked for the Palestinian Family Planning and Protection Agency for 18 years. Her work has not only positively impacted her community but also her personal life.
Amani is a 24 year old midwife and volunteer peer educator with the Palestinian Family Planning and Protection Agency. Her role as a volunteer involves her visiting schools to discuss sexual health in a climate that has many 'taboo' issues such as abortion and sex outside of marriage. This is her story.
Women and girls seeking an abortion face a number of barriers in accessing abortion care. Women like Khawla*, who with three children already and pre-existing health conditions, did not want to continue her pregnancy. Palestine Family Planning and Protection Agency (PFPPA), were there to help ensure she got the care and support she needed.
Contraception use is on the rise, partly thanks to the outreach work The Association Togolaise pour le Bien-Être Familial (ATBEF), in rural communities. Using a network of community-based volunteers and village leaders, ATBEF is reaching as many people as possible.
The unmet need for contraception in Togo currently stands at 34% of the population. Association Togolaise pour le Bien-Être Familial (ATBEF) are turning clients like Dahide and village chief Sossou Sagna into family planning advocates within their communities.
Abla Abassa is a community health worker for Association Togolaise pour le Bien-Être Familial (ATBEF), Togo. She is one of 279 community workers in her region and her work takes her to the remotes areas where the unmet need for contraception is the greatest.
Realizing the importance of involving village leaders to educate their local communities on the harms of forced early marriage and forced sex work in rural areas, Association Togolaise Pour le Bien-Être Familial (ATBEF) created the Village Girl Protection Charters. To date, 870 villages have signed up.
After marrying early, 21-year-old Muna decided that two children was what she wanted for the time being. So she approached the Family Planning Association of Nepal for help.
Hasina turned to sex work when her husband died and left her and her three-year-old daughter without an income. She admits it initially made her feel powerless until she began working as a peer educator with Family Planning Association of India. She now feels that she has some control over her own body.
Neelam Dixit is the branch manager of FPA India's GCACI clinic in Gwalior in Madhya Pradesh. Through the work they are doing within their local community, she is slowly seeing a shift in attitude on abortion and the stigma that surrounds it.