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Women around the world have faced multiple barriers to accessing safe abortion care during the COVID-19 pandemic including the de-prioritization of sexual and reproductive healthcare, overwhelmed health systems and restrictions on movement. The COVID-19 crisis has sparked innovation among IPPF Member Associations who responded swiftly by developing new approaches to reach women with safe abortion care including telemedicine and home-based provision of medical abortion.
In the rural part of Ethiopia where Rewda Kedir works as a midwife, only 14% of married women are using any method of contraception, despite many wanting to. Having open – if challenging – conversations with families is one way her clinic lets people know what their contraceptive options are.
Fatima is a midwife and has worked for the Palestinian Family Planning and Protection Agency for 18 years. Her work has not only positively impacted her community but also her personal life.
Amani is a 24 year old midwife and volunteer peer educator with the Palestinian Family Planning and Protection Agency. Her role as a volunteer involves her visiting schools to discuss sexual health in a climate that has many 'taboo' issues such as abortion and sex outside of marriage. This is her story.
Women and girls seeking an abortion face a number of barriers in accessing abortion care. Women like Khawla*, who with three children already and pre-existing health conditions, did not want to continue her pregnancy. Palestine Family Planning and Protection Agency (PFPPA), were there to help ensure she got the care and support she needed.
After marrying early, 21-year-old Muna decided that two children was what she wanted for the time being. So she approached the Family Planning Association of Nepal for help.
Raising three children by herself, Lijana did not have time to think about her health. That was until she could no longe ignore the feeling that something was wrong. Through friends, she discovered the Albanian Centre of Population and Development (ACDP) clinic. It changed her life.
Eleanor's first cervical cancer screening came back negative. Three years later at her follow-up appointment, she expected the same negative result. Unfortunately, this time it was positive. Once she successfully completed her treatment, her experience turned her into an ardent activist for cervical cancer prevention in her community.
Through social media, 21-year-old Artemisa Seraj stumbled across a post from Aulona center, offering free workshops and seminars on sexual and reproductive healthcare. Curious to learn more about the 'taboo' subject, she attended a talk and was immediately convinced that she wanted to do more to empower women and girls in her community.
Hatixhe is a nurse at the Albanian Centre of Population and Development clinic. With 39 years of experience in gynaecology, she has seen vast improvements in access and services, and believes VIA and cryotherapy is a step further in the right direction for women's healthcare.