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Meet Jennipher, a Youth Action Movement (YAM) volunteer lives in a village outside of Lilongwe, Malawai, where unintended pregnancies amongst young women and girls like her are an everyday reality.
Mary is a 30-year-old sex worker, trained by the Family Planning Association of Malawi to work as a sex worker peer educator through the Linkages project.
In 2017, the Family Planning Association of Malawi (FPAM) refused to sign the Global Gag Rule and consequently lost vital US funding forcing lifeline projects such as Linkages, which provided care to sex workers, to close. By signing the GGR policy, FPAM would be going against what it stood for at the heart of its mission – to offer integrated healthcare in one place no matter how remote.
Just a quarter of Malian girls complete secondary school. Aminata Sonogo is determined that an early pregnancy won't get in the way of her completing her education, despite the stigma she faces.
Mariame Doumbia is a midwife who, provides family planning and sexual health services to Malians in and around the capital. Funding for her role was cut for some time because of the Global Gag Rule – but she's back to doing what she loves most: helping young people.
23-year-old Fatoumata joined the Youth Action Movement in 2018. Since then, she's been involved in projects to help young people understand their sexual rights and health. Periods, teenage pregnancy, female genital mutilation (FGM) – no topic is off-limits for Fatoumata.
In 2017, the Association Malienne pour la Protection et la Promotion de la Famille (AMPPF), was hit hard by the reinstatement of the Global Gag Rule (GGR). The impact was swift and devastating – depleted budgets meant that AMPPF had to cut back on key staff and suspend education activities and community healthcare provision. The situation turned around with funding from the Canadian Government supporting the SheDecides project, filling the gap left by GGR. AMPPF has been able to employ staff ensuring their team can reach the most vulnerable clients who would otherwise be left without access to sexual healthcare and increase their outreach to youth.
There are some years that become a pivotal moment in history – 2020 is one of those. IPPF has never been faced with delivering healthcare in the grip of a global pandemic – here we acknowledge some of our amazing colleagues, clients, and partners as well as events that have shaped the year.
Claudine, aged 27, is a sex worker. "In the past, I was wary of 'contraceptive' methods, but once I tried them and I didn't notice any negative impact on my body, so I made it a habit not to get pregnant".
The Women’s Integrated Sexual Health (WISH Lot 1) programme offers quality integrated sexual and reproductive health services across the Democratic Republic of Congo through IPPF Member, Association pour le Bien-Etre Familial – Naissances Désirables (ABEF-ND).