Every young person has to make  life-changing decisions about their sexual and reproductive health. However many of them cannot access clear, evidence-based information. IPPF's comprehensive sexuality education programmes enable young people to make informed decisions about their sexuality and health, while building life skills and promoting gender equality.

It is a shame that many people misunderstand what Comprehensive Sexuality Education is and are totally oblivious to its benefits to us as families, societies, nations and continents. Some individuals and organizations even go the extra mile of petitioning governments to take CSE out of school curricula. To them my final and only word is that scary stories don’t save lives, Comprehensive Sexuality Education does.
One of the main reasons for the high teen pregnancy rate in Venezuela is the lack of sexual education that is taught in schools and lycées due to the lack of preparation and resources of educators on the subject as well as misinformation and lack of access to contraception and sexual health services
The most recent national health survey carried out by the DHS program in Guinea has shown some severe issues which highlight young people’s need for good quality sexuality education. If neither school nor parents talk about sex education to young people and adolescents, the situation will be deplorable. They are an essential point of contact and if they are well informed, they will be able to facilitate this process.
Comprehensive sexuality education (CSE) is an essential component in promoting SRHR, and in December, members of the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) came together from all over the world to discuss best practises. There were two major outcomes from the conference: An exchange and discussion of best practises on CSE and a joint statement from IPPF to the UNFPA conference hosted by the Government of Norway just after the IPPF conference.
United Kingdom Family Planning Association (FPA) and sexual health charity Brook, spoke to youth volunteers on what they want to see changed in the current relationships and sex education (RSE) curriculum in the UK.
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Current UK guidelines on relationships and sex education (RSE) haven’t changed since 2000; a review is long overdue. In 2019 relationships and sex education will become compulsory in schools in England.
Watch groups in rural areas are trained by staff from Family Planning Association of Malawi (FPAM) to help advise the community on a wide range of sexual and reproductive issues, from family planning to gender-based violence. Mobile clinics that are responsible from training community members are facing closure due to the Global Gag Rule (GGR).
Peer educator programmes are a vital bridge between sexual and reproductive knowledge and youth. The classes provide a safe, open and informed space for students to talk about sex. With the Global Gag Rule (GGR) peer educator programmes will be forced to close.
IPPF welcomes the new International Technical Guidance on Sexuality Education, which was published last week by UNESCO in collaboration with UNAIDS, United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), UN Women, and the World Health Organization (WHO).

Comprehensive Sexuality Education interactive report

Comprehensive Sexuality Education is important for young people's health, wellbeing and future.