- - -
bank-phrom-Tzm3Oyu_6sk-unsplash

News

Latest news from IPPF

Spotlight

A selection of news from across the Federation

UN
News item

Civil Society Welcomes CPD Political Declaration

International Sexual and Reproductive Rights Coalition (ISRRC) statement on the adoption of the Political declaration by the Commission on Population and Development.

Filter our news by:

UN
news item

| 29 April 2024

Civil Society Welcomes CPD Political Declaration

The International Sexual and Reproductive Rights Coalition (ISRRC) celebrates the 30th anniversary of the International Conference on Population and Development Programme of Action (ICPD PoA) and the outcomes of its reviews and its transformative impact on the lives of women, adolescents, girls, and structurally excluded groups across all regions. The ISRRC members have, for the last thirty years, been implementing the PoA, directly impacting gender equality, human rights, and the sexual and reproductive lives of women, adolescents, and girls in all their diversity around the world. We celebrate the contributions and role of civil society, feminist and women’s movements and youth-led organizations in advancing the ICPD agenda. Our efforts have led to significant reductions in maternal mortality rates, increased access to reproductive health services, and improved gender equality in many communities.  Three decades ago, world leaders made a groundbreaking declaration, recognizing sexual and reproductive health and reproductive rights as human rights. The ICPD PoA has not only transformed lives but remains a pertinent solution to today's complex problems. The world has evolved since 1994, presenting unprecedented uncertainties and multiple crises. In this context, the ICPD PoA is not just a historical document but a living agenda that demands immediate action and continuous advancement to address the intricacies of today's global challenges.   The Political Declaration adopted at the 57th session of the Commission on Population and Development is a step towards ensuring accelerated action on the ICPD PoA, including its unfinished business. By reaffirming their commitment to the full implementation of the PoA and the follow-up to international and regional commitments, Member States are recommitting themselves to fulfilling sexual and reproductive rights for all and ensuring access to SRH services for young persons and adolescents, among other relevant issues. The inclusion of 'human rights for all', 'gender equality', and 'the empowerment of all women and girls' in the Political Declaration serves as a poignant reminder of the areas that demand immediate attention. The Political Declaration urges further action to scale up financing for sustainable development and references the right to development. The Political Declaration, just adopted by the CPD, stresses the interlinkages of the ICPD with 'relevant multilateral processes.' We call on Member States to bring the ICPD's goals and objectives to relevant multilateral platforms, in particular, the Summit of the Future and its outcomes. We welcome the contributions of additional ICPD+30 fora, including the Cotonou Global Youth Dialogue Call to Action and the Oslo Statement of Commitment from the 8th Inter Parliamentary Conference on the Implementation of the ICPD. We urge Member States to act now, emphasizing accountability for the ICPD agenda and its impact on the lives of women, adolescents, and girls in all their diversity.   About ISRRC IPPF co-convenes the ISRRC, a cross-regional coalition of more than 100 civil society organizations from around the world, along with Countdown 2030 Europe, Red por la Salud de las Mujeres, Ipas, FEMNET, and ARROW.  

UN
news_item

| 29 April 2024

Civil Society Welcomes CPD Political Declaration

The International Sexual and Reproductive Rights Coalition (ISRRC) celebrates the 30th anniversary of the International Conference on Population and Development Programme of Action (ICPD PoA) and the outcomes of its reviews and its transformative impact on the lives of women, adolescents, girls, and structurally excluded groups across all regions. The ISRRC members have, for the last thirty years, been implementing the PoA, directly impacting gender equality, human rights, and the sexual and reproductive lives of women, adolescents, and girls in all their diversity around the world. We celebrate the contributions and role of civil society, feminist and women’s movements and youth-led organizations in advancing the ICPD agenda. Our efforts have led to significant reductions in maternal mortality rates, increased access to reproductive health services, and improved gender equality in many communities.  Three decades ago, world leaders made a groundbreaking declaration, recognizing sexual and reproductive health and reproductive rights as human rights. The ICPD PoA has not only transformed lives but remains a pertinent solution to today's complex problems. The world has evolved since 1994, presenting unprecedented uncertainties and multiple crises. In this context, the ICPD PoA is not just a historical document but a living agenda that demands immediate action and continuous advancement to address the intricacies of today's global challenges.   The Political Declaration adopted at the 57th session of the Commission on Population and Development is a step towards ensuring accelerated action on the ICPD PoA, including its unfinished business. By reaffirming their commitment to the full implementation of the PoA and the follow-up to international and regional commitments, Member States are recommitting themselves to fulfilling sexual and reproductive rights for all and ensuring access to SRH services for young persons and adolescents, among other relevant issues. The inclusion of 'human rights for all', 'gender equality', and 'the empowerment of all women and girls' in the Political Declaration serves as a poignant reminder of the areas that demand immediate attention. The Political Declaration urges further action to scale up financing for sustainable development and references the right to development. The Political Declaration, just adopted by the CPD, stresses the interlinkages of the ICPD with 'relevant multilateral processes.' We call on Member States to bring the ICPD's goals and objectives to relevant multilateral platforms, in particular, the Summit of the Future and its outcomes. We welcome the contributions of additional ICPD+30 fora, including the Cotonou Global Youth Dialogue Call to Action and the Oslo Statement of Commitment from the 8th Inter Parliamentary Conference on the Implementation of the ICPD. We urge Member States to act now, emphasizing accountability for the ICPD agenda and its impact on the lives of women, adolescents, and girls in all their diversity.   About ISRRC IPPF co-convenes the ISRRC, a cross-regional coalition of more than 100 civil society organizations from around the world, along with Countdown 2030 Europe, Red por la Salud de las Mujeres, Ipas, FEMNET, and ARROW.  

Japan and IPPF
news item

| 26 April 2024

Japan and IPPF commit to strengthen collaboration to promote Women Peace and Security (WPS)

IPPF Director General Dr Alvaro Bermejo attended the Parliamentarians’ Meeting on “ICPD30: Leaving No One Behind in an Ageing World”, which was held in Tokyo on 23 April 2024 at the occasion of 50th anniversary of Japan Parliamentarians Federation for Population (JPFP) along with parliamentarians from 20 countries. This meeting provided an excellent opportunity to look back to the 50 years of collaboration between Japan and IPPF as well as the achievements of the ICPD Plan of Action.   Prior to the meeting, Dr Bermejo met the Japanese Foreign Minister Yoko Kamikawa at MOFA on 22 April 2024. At the meeting, Foreign Minister Kamikawa said: “Sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services, and activities to promote gender equality by IPPF and UNFPA are essential for the achievement of universal health coverage (UHC). Japan intends to continue proactive efforts to achieve UHC. We look forward to continuing our cooperation. I hope IPPF will further contribute to the objectives of “reaching the most vulnerable first” and “leaving no one behind.”  The activities of IPPF and UNFPA are of critical importance also from the perspective of women peace and security (WPS). Japan will be promoting WPS even more vigorously and in a cross-cutting manner. And would like to strengthen cooperation in this area.” Dr Bermejo said: “IPPF provides SRH services at the grassroots level, particularly for vulnerable groups that are hard to reach by public services. By doing so we contribute to improving the wellbeing of people, particularly women and promoting gender equality and women’s rights, which are the core issues of WPS. IPPF will collaborate with Japan’s efforts to achieve both WPS and population related global commitments. As sexual and reproductive rights become increasingly threatened on the global stage, we must all stand together to advance and protect SRHR, recognising it as fundamental to all other efforts towards gender equality and human rights.”   Photo credits: Courtesy of Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan

Japan and IPPF
news_item

| 26 April 2024

Japan and IPPF commit to strengthen collaboration to promote Women Peace and Security (WPS)

IPPF Director General Dr Alvaro Bermejo attended the Parliamentarians’ Meeting on “ICPD30: Leaving No One Behind in an Ageing World”, which was held in Tokyo on 23 April 2024 at the occasion of 50th anniversary of Japan Parliamentarians Federation for Population (JPFP) along with parliamentarians from 20 countries. This meeting provided an excellent opportunity to look back to the 50 years of collaboration between Japan and IPPF as well as the achievements of the ICPD Plan of Action.   Prior to the meeting, Dr Bermejo met the Japanese Foreign Minister Yoko Kamikawa at MOFA on 22 April 2024. At the meeting, Foreign Minister Kamikawa said: “Sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services, and activities to promote gender equality by IPPF and UNFPA are essential for the achievement of universal health coverage (UHC). Japan intends to continue proactive efforts to achieve UHC. We look forward to continuing our cooperation. I hope IPPF will further contribute to the objectives of “reaching the most vulnerable first” and “leaving no one behind.”  The activities of IPPF and UNFPA are of critical importance also from the perspective of women peace and security (WPS). Japan will be promoting WPS even more vigorously and in a cross-cutting manner. And would like to strengthen cooperation in this area.” Dr Bermejo said: “IPPF provides SRH services at the grassroots level, particularly for vulnerable groups that are hard to reach by public services. By doing so we contribute to improving the wellbeing of people, particularly women and promoting gender equality and women’s rights, which are the core issues of WPS. IPPF will collaborate with Japan’s efforts to achieve both WPS and population related global commitments. As sexual and reproductive rights become increasingly threatened on the global stage, we must all stand together to advance and protect SRHR, recognising it as fundamental to all other efforts towards gender equality and human rights.”   Photo credits: Courtesy of Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan

IPPF and MAs at CSW
news item

| 26 March 2024

IPPF Statement on the 68th session of the Commission on the Status of Women (CSW)

IPPF welcomes the agreed conclusions of the 68th session of the Commission on the Status of Women (CSW), on the theme of “Accelerating the achievement of gender equality and the empowerment of all women and girls by addressing poverty and strengthening institutions and financing with a gender perspective”. IPPF actively engaged in the process by providing technical inputs to Member States, raising awareness about the interlinkages between SRHR, poverty, gender equality and the empowerment and human rights of all women and girls. IPPF also supported the engagement of civil society organizations (CSOs) from across the world, bringing women and girls’ real-life experiences into the conversation.    This year’s priority theme provided governments with an important opportunity to find common ground and to decide on accelerated action to respond to the broad and collective challenges related to poverty affecting women and girls, in all their diversity. Although the world has experienced continuous global poverty reduction for several decades, a period of significant crises, including the global Covid-19 pandemic, the triple planetary crisis and ongoing conflicts, resulted in lost progress. Between 2020-2022, poverty increased in low-income countries, which we have not yet recovered from.  Almost 700 million people live in extreme poverty today, and an additional $360 billion of investments are needed per year, in order to achieve gender equality and women’s empowerment across the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).   Poverty is also a key contributor to numerous human rights violations. Globally, women and girls living in poverty are more likely to suffer the consequences of the climate crisis and food insecurity, as well as lack of access to health services, decent work, opportunities and protection measures from gender-based violence, harassment and abuse. Women also have less access to land, natural resources and financial assets.   CSW68 was the Commission’s third in-person convening after the global Covid-19 pandemic and provided an important platform for CSOs to meet, mobilize and elaborate on successful strategies. The negotiations were led by the Ambassador of the Netherlands. Discussions were animated, and there were diverse views on topics including SRHR, human rights, and multiple and intersecting forms of discrimination (MIFD).(1) Geopolitical landscape  The geopolitical backdrop to this year’s negotiations was, at times, extremely divided, with key issues such as the right to development, sexual and reproductive health and rights, comprehensive sexuality education, MIFD, family-related language, and ongoing humanitarian crises and conflicts causing political stalemate at times. Nonetheless, in the end, a consensus was reached, and Agreed Conclusions were adopted.  Sexual and reproductive health and reproductive rights  IPPF welcomes strong references to sexual and reproductive health (SRH), health care-services, and sexual and reproductive health and rights: in particular, preambular paragraph PP27 and operative paragraphs (ii), (kk), (ll) and (mm). The consensus reached at this year’s Commission reflects the broad-based support of Member States to take steps to address the opportunities and challenges that arise in the context of SRH and poverty, and strengthening institutions and financing with a gender perspective.   Adolescents   We welcome the Agreed Conclusion’s references to adolescents and girls, recognizing the need for a life course approach and their experiences of multidimensional forms of poverty. We also welcome language to promote the full, equal and meaningful participation and leadership of young women, adolescents and girls in the context of addressing poverty and strengthening institutions and gender-responsive financing. In particular, we welcome the language addressing the gender-specific barriers to their rights and empowerment, such as all forms of violence, including sexual and gender-based violence, child, early and forced marriage, and adolescent pregnancy, as well as the unequal distribution of unpaid care work.  Multiple and intersecting forms of discrimination   We welcome references to multiple and intersecting forms of discrimination in the text given its centrality to this year’s theme. Women, adolescents, girls, and marginalized groups experiencing MIFD are more likely to be structurally excluded and it is therefore important the Agreed Conclusions acknowledge this link with poverty eradication, and ensure gender-responsive actions and policies, including through the implementation of robust social protection measures and public services.   Diversity, gender-responsiveness and human rights references  We welcome the references to the diversity of situations and conditions of women and girls in the text, as well as the reference to ensure the full, equal and meaningful participation and representation of women in diverse situations and conditions in all spheres of public life and decision-making. This includes participation and representation in economic policy, budget and financial processes, public institutions, and in designing and implementing poverty eradication policies to both address institutional gender biases and promote pro-poor, economic and social policy actions that fully respect the human rights of all women and girls.  We welcome strong references to the human rights and fundamental freedoms of all women and girls in the text. In this sense, we welcome the linkage between social protection systems and the fulfillment of women’s and girls’ human rights; the recognition of the challenges to the full realization of human rights of older women; the reaffirmation that human rights of women include their right to have control over and decide freely and responsibly on all matters related to their sexuality; and the need to ensure full respect for women and girls’ human rights in the digital context, to name some salient examples.     Putting the Agreed Conclusions into practice  Despite intensive and, at times, difficult political deliberations around key issues, the adoption of Agreed Conclusions signals the strong cross-regional support for women’s and girls’ human rights, the mandate of the Commission and its priority theme. It also reflects cross-regional support for key issues, including SRHR, human rights, and preventing, addressing and eliminating gender-based violence.   The importance and success of the Agreed Conclusions lie in its implementation at the national level. IPPF and its Member Associations are well placed as a locally owned, global Federation to work to ensure the implementation of the Agreed Conclusions at national, regional, and global levels. This will ultimately and most importantly benefit the lives of women, adolescents, girls, and other marginalized groups in the communities where they live.   ______ (1) Intersectionality is a term used to describe the idea that social relations involve multiple intersecting forms of discrimination. This means that a person might experience several forms of discrimination, such as sexism, racism, and ableism, all at the same time. See UNDP, “What is intersectionality? And why is it important for gender equality?” (May 27, 2023) Available at What is intersectionality? And why is it important for gender equality? | United Nations Development Programme (undp.org)  

IPPF and MAs at CSW
news_item

| 26 March 2024

IPPF Statement on the 68th session of the Commission on the Status of Women (CSW)

IPPF welcomes the agreed conclusions of the 68th session of the Commission on the Status of Women (CSW), on the theme of “Accelerating the achievement of gender equality and the empowerment of all women and girls by addressing poverty and strengthening institutions and financing with a gender perspective”. IPPF actively engaged in the process by providing technical inputs to Member States, raising awareness about the interlinkages between SRHR, poverty, gender equality and the empowerment and human rights of all women and girls. IPPF also supported the engagement of civil society organizations (CSOs) from across the world, bringing women and girls’ real-life experiences into the conversation.    This year’s priority theme provided governments with an important opportunity to find common ground and to decide on accelerated action to respond to the broad and collective challenges related to poverty affecting women and girls, in all their diversity. Although the world has experienced continuous global poverty reduction for several decades, a period of significant crises, including the global Covid-19 pandemic, the triple planetary crisis and ongoing conflicts, resulted in lost progress. Between 2020-2022, poverty increased in low-income countries, which we have not yet recovered from.  Almost 700 million people live in extreme poverty today, and an additional $360 billion of investments are needed per year, in order to achieve gender equality and women’s empowerment across the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).   Poverty is also a key contributor to numerous human rights violations. Globally, women and girls living in poverty are more likely to suffer the consequences of the climate crisis and food insecurity, as well as lack of access to health services, decent work, opportunities and protection measures from gender-based violence, harassment and abuse. Women also have less access to land, natural resources and financial assets.   CSW68 was the Commission’s third in-person convening after the global Covid-19 pandemic and provided an important platform for CSOs to meet, mobilize and elaborate on successful strategies. The negotiations were led by the Ambassador of the Netherlands. Discussions were animated, and there were diverse views on topics including SRHR, human rights, and multiple and intersecting forms of discrimination (MIFD).(1) Geopolitical landscape  The geopolitical backdrop to this year’s negotiations was, at times, extremely divided, with key issues such as the right to development, sexual and reproductive health and rights, comprehensive sexuality education, MIFD, family-related language, and ongoing humanitarian crises and conflicts causing political stalemate at times. Nonetheless, in the end, a consensus was reached, and Agreed Conclusions were adopted.  Sexual and reproductive health and reproductive rights  IPPF welcomes strong references to sexual and reproductive health (SRH), health care-services, and sexual and reproductive health and rights: in particular, preambular paragraph PP27 and operative paragraphs (ii), (kk), (ll) and (mm). The consensus reached at this year’s Commission reflects the broad-based support of Member States to take steps to address the opportunities and challenges that arise in the context of SRH and poverty, and strengthening institutions and financing with a gender perspective.   Adolescents   We welcome the Agreed Conclusion’s references to adolescents and girls, recognizing the need for a life course approach and their experiences of multidimensional forms of poverty. We also welcome language to promote the full, equal and meaningful participation and leadership of young women, adolescents and girls in the context of addressing poverty and strengthening institutions and gender-responsive financing. In particular, we welcome the language addressing the gender-specific barriers to their rights and empowerment, such as all forms of violence, including sexual and gender-based violence, child, early and forced marriage, and adolescent pregnancy, as well as the unequal distribution of unpaid care work.  Multiple and intersecting forms of discrimination   We welcome references to multiple and intersecting forms of discrimination in the text given its centrality to this year’s theme. Women, adolescents, girls, and marginalized groups experiencing MIFD are more likely to be structurally excluded and it is therefore important the Agreed Conclusions acknowledge this link with poverty eradication, and ensure gender-responsive actions and policies, including through the implementation of robust social protection measures and public services.   Diversity, gender-responsiveness and human rights references  We welcome the references to the diversity of situations and conditions of women and girls in the text, as well as the reference to ensure the full, equal and meaningful participation and representation of women in diverse situations and conditions in all spheres of public life and decision-making. This includes participation and representation in economic policy, budget and financial processes, public institutions, and in designing and implementing poverty eradication policies to both address institutional gender biases and promote pro-poor, economic and social policy actions that fully respect the human rights of all women and girls.  We welcome strong references to the human rights and fundamental freedoms of all women and girls in the text. In this sense, we welcome the linkage between social protection systems and the fulfillment of women’s and girls’ human rights; the recognition of the challenges to the full realization of human rights of older women; the reaffirmation that human rights of women include their right to have control over and decide freely and responsibly on all matters related to their sexuality; and the need to ensure full respect for women and girls’ human rights in the digital context, to name some salient examples.     Putting the Agreed Conclusions into practice  Despite intensive and, at times, difficult political deliberations around key issues, the adoption of Agreed Conclusions signals the strong cross-regional support for women’s and girls’ human rights, the mandate of the Commission and its priority theme. It also reflects cross-regional support for key issues, including SRHR, human rights, and preventing, addressing and eliminating gender-based violence.   The importance and success of the Agreed Conclusions lie in its implementation at the national level. IPPF and its Member Associations are well placed as a locally owned, global Federation to work to ensure the implementation of the Agreed Conclusions at national, regional, and global levels. This will ultimately and most importantly benefit the lives of women, adolescents, girls, and other marginalized groups in the communities where they live.   ______ (1) Intersectionality is a term used to describe the idea that social relations involve multiple intersecting forms of discrimination. This means that a person might experience several forms of discrimination, such as sexism, racism, and ableism, all at the same time. See UNDP, “What is intersectionality? And why is it important for gender equality?” (May 27, 2023) Available at What is intersectionality? And why is it important for gender equality? | United Nations Development Programme (undp.org)  

ACSHR
news item

| 02 March 2024

The Japanese Ambassador Emphasizes Importance of the Tokyo International Conference for African Development (TICAD) at the ACSHR

The Japanese Ambassador Emphasizes Importance of the Tokyo International Conference for African Development (TICAD) and Reproductive Health for Advancing Human Security and Enhancing People’s Wellbeing in Africa at The 11th African Conference on Sexual Health and Rights (ACSHR) Today is the last day of the 11th African Conference on Sexual Health and Rights (ACSHR) held in Rabat, Morocco from February 26 to March 2, 2024, under the esteemed patronage of His Majesty King Mohammed VI. The conference theme is “The Sexual and Reproductive Health and Family Well-being in Africa”. As the 11th SCSHR organize committee, IPPF has been working hard jointly with its Member Association in Morocco (AMPF) and like-minded organizations such as UNFPA as driving force to make sure of the following conference objectives are met: • Take stock of responses to sexual and reproductive health and rights of women and youth in Africa; • Identify, interrogate and consolidate on best and promising SRHR policies and practices for women and youth SRHR in Africa; • Provide networking opportunities, strengthen coalitions and movements for advancing women and youth SRHR in Africa. At the Plenary Session held in the morning of the last day of the three-day conference, Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of Japan to Tunisia, H.E. Mr Takeshi Osuga made a presentation entitled ‘TICAD 8 and Japan’s Cooperation on African Continent’. After introducing TICAD's history since 1993, he explained how the SRHR have been incorporated into the TICAD Summit outcomes. He also briefed about Japan’s contribution to African development in relevant areas in partnership with IPPF and its member associations. During his speech, H.E. Mr Osuga said: "Japan will continue to invest in SRHR projects in Africa and support the advocacy efforts in support of SRHR. Whether or not SRHR will be further mainstreamed internationally and especially in Africa, in line with African Union's Agenda 2063 and the Goal 3, target 7 of the SDGs, is totally up to African countries and the civil society in each country." IPPF has participated in the TICAD process since 2006. In next year 2025, the 9th TICAD will be held in Yokohama. IPPF will continue to advocate SRHR to make it one of the core topics of the TICAD. For further information, please contact Mr Mustapha Kameyal [email protected] (Arabic and English) and Ms Yuri Taniguchi [email protected] (Japanese).   About the International Planned Parenthood Federation The International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) is a global healthcare provider and a leading advocate of sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) for all. We are a movement of 150 Member Associations and Collaborative Partners with a presence in over 146 countries. Building on a proud history of 70 years of achievement, we commit to lead a locally owned, globally connected civil society movement that provides and enables services and champions sexual and reproductive health and rights for all, especially the under-served. We advocate for a world where people are provided with the information they need to make informed decisions about their sexual health and bodies. We stand up and fight for sexual and reproductive rights, and against those who seek to deny people their human right to bodily autonomy and freedom. We deliver care that is rooted in rights, respect, and dignity - no matter what.

ACSHR
news_item

| 02 March 2024

The Japanese Ambassador Emphasizes Importance of the Tokyo International Conference for African Development (TICAD) at the ACSHR

The Japanese Ambassador Emphasizes Importance of the Tokyo International Conference for African Development (TICAD) and Reproductive Health for Advancing Human Security and Enhancing People’s Wellbeing in Africa at The 11th African Conference on Sexual Health and Rights (ACSHR) Today is the last day of the 11th African Conference on Sexual Health and Rights (ACSHR) held in Rabat, Morocco from February 26 to March 2, 2024, under the esteemed patronage of His Majesty King Mohammed VI. The conference theme is “The Sexual and Reproductive Health and Family Well-being in Africa”. As the 11th SCSHR organize committee, IPPF has been working hard jointly with its Member Association in Morocco (AMPF) and like-minded organizations such as UNFPA as driving force to make sure of the following conference objectives are met: • Take stock of responses to sexual and reproductive health and rights of women and youth in Africa; • Identify, interrogate and consolidate on best and promising SRHR policies and practices for women and youth SRHR in Africa; • Provide networking opportunities, strengthen coalitions and movements for advancing women and youth SRHR in Africa. At the Plenary Session held in the morning of the last day of the three-day conference, Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of Japan to Tunisia, H.E. Mr Takeshi Osuga made a presentation entitled ‘TICAD 8 and Japan’s Cooperation on African Continent’. After introducing TICAD's history since 1993, he explained how the SRHR have been incorporated into the TICAD Summit outcomes. He also briefed about Japan’s contribution to African development in relevant areas in partnership with IPPF and its member associations. During his speech, H.E. Mr Osuga said: "Japan will continue to invest in SRHR projects in Africa and support the advocacy efforts in support of SRHR. Whether or not SRHR will be further mainstreamed internationally and especially in Africa, in line with African Union's Agenda 2063 and the Goal 3, target 7 of the SDGs, is totally up to African countries and the civil society in each country." IPPF has participated in the TICAD process since 2006. In next year 2025, the 9th TICAD will be held in Yokohama. IPPF will continue to advocate SRHR to make it one of the core topics of the TICAD. For further information, please contact Mr Mustapha Kameyal [email protected] (Arabic and English) and Ms Yuri Taniguchi [email protected] (Japanese).   About the International Planned Parenthood Federation The International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) is a global healthcare provider and a leading advocate of sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) for all. We are a movement of 150 Member Associations and Collaborative Partners with a presence in over 146 countries. Building on a proud history of 70 years of achievement, we commit to lead a locally owned, globally connected civil society movement that provides and enables services and champions sexual and reproductive health and rights for all, especially the under-served. We advocate for a world where people are provided with the information they need to make informed decisions about their sexual health and bodies. We stand up and fight for sexual and reproductive rights, and against those who seek to deny people their human right to bodily autonomy and freedom. We deliver care that is rooted in rights, respect, and dignity - no matter what.

Sudanese woman
news item

| 27 February 2024

Government of Japan awards IPPF $1.9 million to support women and girls affected by natural disasters and conflicts around the world

With support from the Government of Japan, International Planned Parenthood Federation’s (IPPF) Member Associations in five countries, namely Afghanistan, Palestine, Sudan, Ukraine and Yemen, will provide urgent sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services to communities affected by natural disasters and conflict situations.  These IPPF Member Associations will: Provide sexual and reproductive health (SRH) and maternal and child health services for women and girls and marginalized communities in six remote and flood affected provinces in Afghanistan; Provide urgent sexual and reproductive health services to communities affected by the escalating violence in Palestine; Improve accessibility of services and community sustainability to decrease sexual and reproductive health-related mortality and morbidity of women and girls in three States with high internally-displaced populations in Sudan; Restore health facilities and access to maternal health services in conflict affected areas for populations affected by the destruction of the Kakhovka Dam in Ukraine;  Provide critical sexual, reproductive and maternal health care to internally displaced people and local communities in Yemen. This vital funding from Japan will help with provision of badly needed but currently missing health services, especially for women, so that they can live with dignity and free from unwanted pregnancies, death of themselves and their newborns, and reproductive ill-health. It will allow us to provide essential and quality SRH and maternal and child health services in the communities, prevent and manage the consequences of sexual and gender-based violence, including the clinical management of rape, equip community-based midwives with skills to provide high quality obstetric and neonatal services and strengthen health information systems to collect high quality data to respond to the needs and priorities of women and girls’ health. IPPF Director General, Dr Alvaro Bemejo, said, "I offer heartfelt thanks to the Government of Japan for their  unparalleled generosity to enable IPPF to respond to the needs of women and girls caught up in crises around the world. This generosity will allow IPPF and our local partners to provide a critical lifeline to the growing number of people in desperate need of humanitarian assistance."   By the end of December 2024, IPPF, through our local partners in the five countries, will aim to deliver health services and information to at least 239,000 people in total.   For further information, please contact Yuri Taniguchi, IPPF London Office, at [email protected].   Photo Credits: IPPF/Hannah Maule-ffinch/Sudan

Sudanese woman
news_item

| 27 February 2024

Government of Japan awards IPPF $1.9 million to support women and girls affected by natural disasters and conflicts around the world

With support from the Government of Japan, International Planned Parenthood Federation’s (IPPF) Member Associations in five countries, namely Afghanistan, Palestine, Sudan, Ukraine and Yemen, will provide urgent sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services to communities affected by natural disasters and conflict situations.  These IPPF Member Associations will: Provide sexual and reproductive health (SRH) and maternal and child health services for women and girls and marginalized communities in six remote and flood affected provinces in Afghanistan; Provide urgent sexual and reproductive health services to communities affected by the escalating violence in Palestine; Improve accessibility of services and community sustainability to decrease sexual and reproductive health-related mortality and morbidity of women and girls in three States with high internally-displaced populations in Sudan; Restore health facilities and access to maternal health services in conflict affected areas for populations affected by the destruction of the Kakhovka Dam in Ukraine;  Provide critical sexual, reproductive and maternal health care to internally displaced people and local communities in Yemen. This vital funding from Japan will help with provision of badly needed but currently missing health services, especially for women, so that they can live with dignity and free from unwanted pregnancies, death of themselves and their newborns, and reproductive ill-health. It will allow us to provide essential and quality SRH and maternal and child health services in the communities, prevent and manage the consequences of sexual and gender-based violence, including the clinical management of rape, equip community-based midwives with skills to provide high quality obstetric and neonatal services and strengthen health information systems to collect high quality data to respond to the needs and priorities of women and girls’ health. IPPF Director General, Dr Alvaro Bemejo, said, "I offer heartfelt thanks to the Government of Japan for their  unparalleled generosity to enable IPPF to respond to the needs of women and girls caught up in crises around the world. This generosity will allow IPPF and our local partners to provide a critical lifeline to the growing number of people in desperate need of humanitarian assistance."   By the end of December 2024, IPPF, through our local partners in the five countries, will aim to deliver health services and information to at least 239,000 people in total.   For further information, please contact Yuri Taniguchi, IPPF London Office, at [email protected].   Photo Credits: IPPF/Hannah Maule-ffinch/Sudan

hiv-test
news item

| 01 December 2023

IPPF marks World AIDS Day by announcing the launch of a special program to roll out new biomedical HIV prevention methods

IPPF provides comprehensive sexual and reproductive health care to clients around the world. HIV testing, prevention, and treatment services are essential parts of our integrated sexual and reproductive health care package. To expand the choices individuals have to protect themselves from HIV, IPPF is excited to announce a special program to provide the newest methods of HIV prevention - injectable PrEP (a 2-monthly injection of cabotegravir-LA) and the vaginal ring (a monthly vaginal ring of dapivirine), as well as expanding where oral PrEP is offered. This program is being launched through a consortium of IPPF Member Associations called the Consortium to Advance Access to new HIV Prevention Products (CAAPP) - led by Family Planning Association of India, and including the Family Life Association of Eswatini, Lesotho Planned Parenthood Association, Family Planning Association of Malawi, Federation of Reproductive Health Associations, Malaysia, Family Planning Association of Nepal, and Planned Parenthood Association of Thailand. We hope this program will increase access to the number of ways people can protect themselves from HIV, supporting individual's choice to find an HIV prevention method that works for them.

hiv-test
news_item

| 01 December 2023

IPPF marks World AIDS Day by announcing the launch of a special program to roll out new biomedical HIV prevention methods

IPPF provides comprehensive sexual and reproductive health care to clients around the world. HIV testing, prevention, and treatment services are essential parts of our integrated sexual and reproductive health care package. To expand the choices individuals have to protect themselves from HIV, IPPF is excited to announce a special program to provide the newest methods of HIV prevention - injectable PrEP (a 2-monthly injection of cabotegravir-LA) and the vaginal ring (a monthly vaginal ring of dapivirine), as well as expanding where oral PrEP is offered. This program is being launched through a consortium of IPPF Member Associations called the Consortium to Advance Access to new HIV Prevention Products (CAAPP) - led by Family Planning Association of India, and including the Family Life Association of Eswatini, Lesotho Planned Parenthood Association, Family Planning Association of Malawi, Federation of Reproductive Health Associations, Malaysia, Family Planning Association of Nepal, and Planned Parenthood Association of Thailand. We hope this program will increase access to the number of ways people can protect themselves from HIV, supporting individual's choice to find an HIV prevention method that works for them.

UN
news item

| 29 April 2024

Civil Society Welcomes CPD Political Declaration

The International Sexual and Reproductive Rights Coalition (ISRRC) celebrates the 30th anniversary of the International Conference on Population and Development Programme of Action (ICPD PoA) and the outcomes of its reviews and its transformative impact on the lives of women, adolescents, girls, and structurally excluded groups across all regions. The ISRRC members have, for the last thirty years, been implementing the PoA, directly impacting gender equality, human rights, and the sexual and reproductive lives of women, adolescents, and girls in all their diversity around the world. We celebrate the contributions and role of civil society, feminist and women’s movements and youth-led organizations in advancing the ICPD agenda. Our efforts have led to significant reductions in maternal mortality rates, increased access to reproductive health services, and improved gender equality in many communities.  Three decades ago, world leaders made a groundbreaking declaration, recognizing sexual and reproductive health and reproductive rights as human rights. The ICPD PoA has not only transformed lives but remains a pertinent solution to today's complex problems. The world has evolved since 1994, presenting unprecedented uncertainties and multiple crises. In this context, the ICPD PoA is not just a historical document but a living agenda that demands immediate action and continuous advancement to address the intricacies of today's global challenges.   The Political Declaration adopted at the 57th session of the Commission on Population and Development is a step towards ensuring accelerated action on the ICPD PoA, including its unfinished business. By reaffirming their commitment to the full implementation of the PoA and the follow-up to international and regional commitments, Member States are recommitting themselves to fulfilling sexual and reproductive rights for all and ensuring access to SRH services for young persons and adolescents, among other relevant issues. The inclusion of 'human rights for all', 'gender equality', and 'the empowerment of all women and girls' in the Political Declaration serves as a poignant reminder of the areas that demand immediate attention. The Political Declaration urges further action to scale up financing for sustainable development and references the right to development. The Political Declaration, just adopted by the CPD, stresses the interlinkages of the ICPD with 'relevant multilateral processes.' We call on Member States to bring the ICPD's goals and objectives to relevant multilateral platforms, in particular, the Summit of the Future and its outcomes. We welcome the contributions of additional ICPD+30 fora, including the Cotonou Global Youth Dialogue Call to Action and the Oslo Statement of Commitment from the 8th Inter Parliamentary Conference on the Implementation of the ICPD. We urge Member States to act now, emphasizing accountability for the ICPD agenda and its impact on the lives of women, adolescents, and girls in all their diversity.   About ISRRC IPPF co-convenes the ISRRC, a cross-regional coalition of more than 100 civil society organizations from around the world, along with Countdown 2030 Europe, Red por la Salud de las Mujeres, Ipas, FEMNET, and ARROW.  

UN
news_item

| 29 April 2024

Civil Society Welcomes CPD Political Declaration

The International Sexual and Reproductive Rights Coalition (ISRRC) celebrates the 30th anniversary of the International Conference on Population and Development Programme of Action (ICPD PoA) and the outcomes of its reviews and its transformative impact on the lives of women, adolescents, girls, and structurally excluded groups across all regions. The ISRRC members have, for the last thirty years, been implementing the PoA, directly impacting gender equality, human rights, and the sexual and reproductive lives of women, adolescents, and girls in all their diversity around the world. We celebrate the contributions and role of civil society, feminist and women’s movements and youth-led organizations in advancing the ICPD agenda. Our efforts have led to significant reductions in maternal mortality rates, increased access to reproductive health services, and improved gender equality in many communities.  Three decades ago, world leaders made a groundbreaking declaration, recognizing sexual and reproductive health and reproductive rights as human rights. The ICPD PoA has not only transformed lives but remains a pertinent solution to today's complex problems. The world has evolved since 1994, presenting unprecedented uncertainties and multiple crises. In this context, the ICPD PoA is not just a historical document but a living agenda that demands immediate action and continuous advancement to address the intricacies of today's global challenges.   The Political Declaration adopted at the 57th session of the Commission on Population and Development is a step towards ensuring accelerated action on the ICPD PoA, including its unfinished business. By reaffirming their commitment to the full implementation of the PoA and the follow-up to international and regional commitments, Member States are recommitting themselves to fulfilling sexual and reproductive rights for all and ensuring access to SRH services for young persons and adolescents, among other relevant issues. The inclusion of 'human rights for all', 'gender equality', and 'the empowerment of all women and girls' in the Political Declaration serves as a poignant reminder of the areas that demand immediate attention. The Political Declaration urges further action to scale up financing for sustainable development and references the right to development. The Political Declaration, just adopted by the CPD, stresses the interlinkages of the ICPD with 'relevant multilateral processes.' We call on Member States to bring the ICPD's goals and objectives to relevant multilateral platforms, in particular, the Summit of the Future and its outcomes. We welcome the contributions of additional ICPD+30 fora, including the Cotonou Global Youth Dialogue Call to Action and the Oslo Statement of Commitment from the 8th Inter Parliamentary Conference on the Implementation of the ICPD. We urge Member States to act now, emphasizing accountability for the ICPD agenda and its impact on the lives of women, adolescents, and girls in all their diversity.   About ISRRC IPPF co-convenes the ISRRC, a cross-regional coalition of more than 100 civil society organizations from around the world, along with Countdown 2030 Europe, Red por la Salud de las Mujeres, Ipas, FEMNET, and ARROW.  

Japan and IPPF
news item

| 26 April 2024

Japan and IPPF commit to strengthen collaboration to promote Women Peace and Security (WPS)

IPPF Director General Dr Alvaro Bermejo attended the Parliamentarians’ Meeting on “ICPD30: Leaving No One Behind in an Ageing World”, which was held in Tokyo on 23 April 2024 at the occasion of 50th anniversary of Japan Parliamentarians Federation for Population (JPFP) along with parliamentarians from 20 countries. This meeting provided an excellent opportunity to look back to the 50 years of collaboration between Japan and IPPF as well as the achievements of the ICPD Plan of Action.   Prior to the meeting, Dr Bermejo met the Japanese Foreign Minister Yoko Kamikawa at MOFA on 22 April 2024. At the meeting, Foreign Minister Kamikawa said: “Sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services, and activities to promote gender equality by IPPF and UNFPA are essential for the achievement of universal health coverage (UHC). Japan intends to continue proactive efforts to achieve UHC. We look forward to continuing our cooperation. I hope IPPF will further contribute to the objectives of “reaching the most vulnerable first” and “leaving no one behind.”  The activities of IPPF and UNFPA are of critical importance also from the perspective of women peace and security (WPS). Japan will be promoting WPS even more vigorously and in a cross-cutting manner. And would like to strengthen cooperation in this area.” Dr Bermejo said: “IPPF provides SRH services at the grassroots level, particularly for vulnerable groups that are hard to reach by public services. By doing so we contribute to improving the wellbeing of people, particularly women and promoting gender equality and women’s rights, which are the core issues of WPS. IPPF will collaborate with Japan’s efforts to achieve both WPS and population related global commitments. As sexual and reproductive rights become increasingly threatened on the global stage, we must all stand together to advance and protect SRHR, recognising it as fundamental to all other efforts towards gender equality and human rights.”   Photo credits: Courtesy of Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan

Japan and IPPF
news_item

| 26 April 2024

Japan and IPPF commit to strengthen collaboration to promote Women Peace and Security (WPS)

IPPF Director General Dr Alvaro Bermejo attended the Parliamentarians’ Meeting on “ICPD30: Leaving No One Behind in an Ageing World”, which was held in Tokyo on 23 April 2024 at the occasion of 50th anniversary of Japan Parliamentarians Federation for Population (JPFP) along with parliamentarians from 20 countries. This meeting provided an excellent opportunity to look back to the 50 years of collaboration between Japan and IPPF as well as the achievements of the ICPD Plan of Action.   Prior to the meeting, Dr Bermejo met the Japanese Foreign Minister Yoko Kamikawa at MOFA on 22 April 2024. At the meeting, Foreign Minister Kamikawa said: “Sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services, and activities to promote gender equality by IPPF and UNFPA are essential for the achievement of universal health coverage (UHC). Japan intends to continue proactive efforts to achieve UHC. We look forward to continuing our cooperation. I hope IPPF will further contribute to the objectives of “reaching the most vulnerable first” and “leaving no one behind.”  The activities of IPPF and UNFPA are of critical importance also from the perspective of women peace and security (WPS). Japan will be promoting WPS even more vigorously and in a cross-cutting manner. And would like to strengthen cooperation in this area.” Dr Bermejo said: “IPPF provides SRH services at the grassroots level, particularly for vulnerable groups that are hard to reach by public services. By doing so we contribute to improving the wellbeing of people, particularly women and promoting gender equality and women’s rights, which are the core issues of WPS. IPPF will collaborate with Japan’s efforts to achieve both WPS and population related global commitments. As sexual and reproductive rights become increasingly threatened on the global stage, we must all stand together to advance and protect SRHR, recognising it as fundamental to all other efforts towards gender equality and human rights.”   Photo credits: Courtesy of Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan

IPPF and MAs at CSW
news item

| 26 March 2024

IPPF Statement on the 68th session of the Commission on the Status of Women (CSW)

IPPF welcomes the agreed conclusions of the 68th session of the Commission on the Status of Women (CSW), on the theme of “Accelerating the achievement of gender equality and the empowerment of all women and girls by addressing poverty and strengthening institutions and financing with a gender perspective”. IPPF actively engaged in the process by providing technical inputs to Member States, raising awareness about the interlinkages between SRHR, poverty, gender equality and the empowerment and human rights of all women and girls. IPPF also supported the engagement of civil society organizations (CSOs) from across the world, bringing women and girls’ real-life experiences into the conversation.    This year’s priority theme provided governments with an important opportunity to find common ground and to decide on accelerated action to respond to the broad and collective challenges related to poverty affecting women and girls, in all their diversity. Although the world has experienced continuous global poverty reduction for several decades, a period of significant crises, including the global Covid-19 pandemic, the triple planetary crisis and ongoing conflicts, resulted in lost progress. Between 2020-2022, poverty increased in low-income countries, which we have not yet recovered from.  Almost 700 million people live in extreme poverty today, and an additional $360 billion of investments are needed per year, in order to achieve gender equality and women’s empowerment across the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).   Poverty is also a key contributor to numerous human rights violations. Globally, women and girls living in poverty are more likely to suffer the consequences of the climate crisis and food insecurity, as well as lack of access to health services, decent work, opportunities and protection measures from gender-based violence, harassment and abuse. Women also have less access to land, natural resources and financial assets.   CSW68 was the Commission’s third in-person convening after the global Covid-19 pandemic and provided an important platform for CSOs to meet, mobilize and elaborate on successful strategies. The negotiations were led by the Ambassador of the Netherlands. Discussions were animated, and there were diverse views on topics including SRHR, human rights, and multiple and intersecting forms of discrimination (MIFD).(1) Geopolitical landscape  The geopolitical backdrop to this year’s negotiations was, at times, extremely divided, with key issues such as the right to development, sexual and reproductive health and rights, comprehensive sexuality education, MIFD, family-related language, and ongoing humanitarian crises and conflicts causing political stalemate at times. Nonetheless, in the end, a consensus was reached, and Agreed Conclusions were adopted.  Sexual and reproductive health and reproductive rights  IPPF welcomes strong references to sexual and reproductive health (SRH), health care-services, and sexual and reproductive health and rights: in particular, preambular paragraph PP27 and operative paragraphs (ii), (kk), (ll) and (mm). The consensus reached at this year’s Commission reflects the broad-based support of Member States to take steps to address the opportunities and challenges that arise in the context of SRH and poverty, and strengthening institutions and financing with a gender perspective.   Adolescents   We welcome the Agreed Conclusion’s references to adolescents and girls, recognizing the need for a life course approach and their experiences of multidimensional forms of poverty. We also welcome language to promote the full, equal and meaningful participation and leadership of young women, adolescents and girls in the context of addressing poverty and strengthening institutions and gender-responsive financing. In particular, we welcome the language addressing the gender-specific barriers to their rights and empowerment, such as all forms of violence, including sexual and gender-based violence, child, early and forced marriage, and adolescent pregnancy, as well as the unequal distribution of unpaid care work.  Multiple and intersecting forms of discrimination   We welcome references to multiple and intersecting forms of discrimination in the text given its centrality to this year’s theme. Women, adolescents, girls, and marginalized groups experiencing MIFD are more likely to be structurally excluded and it is therefore important the Agreed Conclusions acknowledge this link with poverty eradication, and ensure gender-responsive actions and policies, including through the implementation of robust social protection measures and public services.   Diversity, gender-responsiveness and human rights references  We welcome the references to the diversity of situations and conditions of women and girls in the text, as well as the reference to ensure the full, equal and meaningful participation and representation of women in diverse situations and conditions in all spheres of public life and decision-making. This includes participation and representation in economic policy, budget and financial processes, public institutions, and in designing and implementing poverty eradication policies to both address institutional gender biases and promote pro-poor, economic and social policy actions that fully respect the human rights of all women and girls.  We welcome strong references to the human rights and fundamental freedoms of all women and girls in the text. In this sense, we welcome the linkage between social protection systems and the fulfillment of women’s and girls’ human rights; the recognition of the challenges to the full realization of human rights of older women; the reaffirmation that human rights of women include their right to have control over and decide freely and responsibly on all matters related to their sexuality; and the need to ensure full respect for women and girls’ human rights in the digital context, to name some salient examples.     Putting the Agreed Conclusions into practice  Despite intensive and, at times, difficult political deliberations around key issues, the adoption of Agreed Conclusions signals the strong cross-regional support for women’s and girls’ human rights, the mandate of the Commission and its priority theme. It also reflects cross-regional support for key issues, including SRHR, human rights, and preventing, addressing and eliminating gender-based violence.   The importance and success of the Agreed Conclusions lie in its implementation at the national level. IPPF and its Member Associations are well placed as a locally owned, global Federation to work to ensure the implementation of the Agreed Conclusions at national, regional, and global levels. This will ultimately and most importantly benefit the lives of women, adolescents, girls, and other marginalized groups in the communities where they live.   ______ (1) Intersectionality is a term used to describe the idea that social relations involve multiple intersecting forms of discrimination. This means that a person might experience several forms of discrimination, such as sexism, racism, and ableism, all at the same time. See UNDP, “What is intersectionality? And why is it important for gender equality?” (May 27, 2023) Available at What is intersectionality? And why is it important for gender equality? | United Nations Development Programme (undp.org)  

IPPF and MAs at CSW
news_item

| 26 March 2024

IPPF Statement on the 68th session of the Commission on the Status of Women (CSW)

IPPF welcomes the agreed conclusions of the 68th session of the Commission on the Status of Women (CSW), on the theme of “Accelerating the achievement of gender equality and the empowerment of all women and girls by addressing poverty and strengthening institutions and financing with a gender perspective”. IPPF actively engaged in the process by providing technical inputs to Member States, raising awareness about the interlinkages between SRHR, poverty, gender equality and the empowerment and human rights of all women and girls. IPPF also supported the engagement of civil society organizations (CSOs) from across the world, bringing women and girls’ real-life experiences into the conversation.    This year’s priority theme provided governments with an important opportunity to find common ground and to decide on accelerated action to respond to the broad and collective challenges related to poverty affecting women and girls, in all their diversity. Although the world has experienced continuous global poverty reduction for several decades, a period of significant crises, including the global Covid-19 pandemic, the triple planetary crisis and ongoing conflicts, resulted in lost progress. Between 2020-2022, poverty increased in low-income countries, which we have not yet recovered from.  Almost 700 million people live in extreme poverty today, and an additional $360 billion of investments are needed per year, in order to achieve gender equality and women’s empowerment across the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).   Poverty is also a key contributor to numerous human rights violations. Globally, women and girls living in poverty are more likely to suffer the consequences of the climate crisis and food insecurity, as well as lack of access to health services, decent work, opportunities and protection measures from gender-based violence, harassment and abuse. Women also have less access to land, natural resources and financial assets.   CSW68 was the Commission’s third in-person convening after the global Covid-19 pandemic and provided an important platform for CSOs to meet, mobilize and elaborate on successful strategies. The negotiations were led by the Ambassador of the Netherlands. Discussions were animated, and there were diverse views on topics including SRHR, human rights, and multiple and intersecting forms of discrimination (MIFD).(1) Geopolitical landscape  The geopolitical backdrop to this year’s negotiations was, at times, extremely divided, with key issues such as the right to development, sexual and reproductive health and rights, comprehensive sexuality education, MIFD, family-related language, and ongoing humanitarian crises and conflicts causing political stalemate at times. Nonetheless, in the end, a consensus was reached, and Agreed Conclusions were adopted.  Sexual and reproductive health and reproductive rights  IPPF welcomes strong references to sexual and reproductive health (SRH), health care-services, and sexual and reproductive health and rights: in particular, preambular paragraph PP27 and operative paragraphs (ii), (kk), (ll) and (mm). The consensus reached at this year’s Commission reflects the broad-based support of Member States to take steps to address the opportunities and challenges that arise in the context of SRH and poverty, and strengthening institutions and financing with a gender perspective.   Adolescents   We welcome the Agreed Conclusion’s references to adolescents and girls, recognizing the need for a life course approach and their experiences of multidimensional forms of poverty. We also welcome language to promote the full, equal and meaningful participation and leadership of young women, adolescents and girls in the context of addressing poverty and strengthening institutions and gender-responsive financing. In particular, we welcome the language addressing the gender-specific barriers to their rights and empowerment, such as all forms of violence, including sexual and gender-based violence, child, early and forced marriage, and adolescent pregnancy, as well as the unequal distribution of unpaid care work.  Multiple and intersecting forms of discrimination   We welcome references to multiple and intersecting forms of discrimination in the text given its centrality to this year’s theme. Women, adolescents, girls, and marginalized groups experiencing MIFD are more likely to be structurally excluded and it is therefore important the Agreed Conclusions acknowledge this link with poverty eradication, and ensure gender-responsive actions and policies, including through the implementation of robust social protection measures and public services.   Diversity, gender-responsiveness and human rights references  We welcome the references to the diversity of situations and conditions of women and girls in the text, as well as the reference to ensure the full, equal and meaningful participation and representation of women in diverse situations and conditions in all spheres of public life and decision-making. This includes participation and representation in economic policy, budget and financial processes, public institutions, and in designing and implementing poverty eradication policies to both address institutional gender biases and promote pro-poor, economic and social policy actions that fully respect the human rights of all women and girls.  We welcome strong references to the human rights and fundamental freedoms of all women and girls in the text. In this sense, we welcome the linkage between social protection systems and the fulfillment of women’s and girls’ human rights; the recognition of the challenges to the full realization of human rights of older women; the reaffirmation that human rights of women include their right to have control over and decide freely and responsibly on all matters related to their sexuality; and the need to ensure full respect for women and girls’ human rights in the digital context, to name some salient examples.     Putting the Agreed Conclusions into practice  Despite intensive and, at times, difficult political deliberations around key issues, the adoption of Agreed Conclusions signals the strong cross-regional support for women’s and girls’ human rights, the mandate of the Commission and its priority theme. It also reflects cross-regional support for key issues, including SRHR, human rights, and preventing, addressing and eliminating gender-based violence.   The importance and success of the Agreed Conclusions lie in its implementation at the national level. IPPF and its Member Associations are well placed as a locally owned, global Federation to work to ensure the implementation of the Agreed Conclusions at national, regional, and global levels. This will ultimately and most importantly benefit the lives of women, adolescents, girls, and other marginalized groups in the communities where they live.   ______ (1) Intersectionality is a term used to describe the idea that social relations involve multiple intersecting forms of discrimination. This means that a person might experience several forms of discrimination, such as sexism, racism, and ableism, all at the same time. See UNDP, “What is intersectionality? And why is it important for gender equality?” (May 27, 2023) Available at What is intersectionality? And why is it important for gender equality? | United Nations Development Programme (undp.org)  

ACSHR
news item

| 02 March 2024

The Japanese Ambassador Emphasizes Importance of the Tokyo International Conference for African Development (TICAD) at the ACSHR

The Japanese Ambassador Emphasizes Importance of the Tokyo International Conference for African Development (TICAD) and Reproductive Health for Advancing Human Security and Enhancing People’s Wellbeing in Africa at The 11th African Conference on Sexual Health and Rights (ACSHR) Today is the last day of the 11th African Conference on Sexual Health and Rights (ACSHR) held in Rabat, Morocco from February 26 to March 2, 2024, under the esteemed patronage of His Majesty King Mohammed VI. The conference theme is “The Sexual and Reproductive Health and Family Well-being in Africa”. As the 11th SCSHR organize committee, IPPF has been working hard jointly with its Member Association in Morocco (AMPF) and like-minded organizations such as UNFPA as driving force to make sure of the following conference objectives are met: • Take stock of responses to sexual and reproductive health and rights of women and youth in Africa; • Identify, interrogate and consolidate on best and promising SRHR policies and practices for women and youth SRHR in Africa; • Provide networking opportunities, strengthen coalitions and movements for advancing women and youth SRHR in Africa. At the Plenary Session held in the morning of the last day of the three-day conference, Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of Japan to Tunisia, H.E. Mr Takeshi Osuga made a presentation entitled ‘TICAD 8 and Japan’s Cooperation on African Continent’. After introducing TICAD's history since 1993, he explained how the SRHR have been incorporated into the TICAD Summit outcomes. He also briefed about Japan’s contribution to African development in relevant areas in partnership with IPPF and its member associations. During his speech, H.E. Mr Osuga said: "Japan will continue to invest in SRHR projects in Africa and support the advocacy efforts in support of SRHR. Whether or not SRHR will be further mainstreamed internationally and especially in Africa, in line with African Union's Agenda 2063 and the Goal 3, target 7 of the SDGs, is totally up to African countries and the civil society in each country." IPPF has participated in the TICAD process since 2006. In next year 2025, the 9th TICAD will be held in Yokohama. IPPF will continue to advocate SRHR to make it one of the core topics of the TICAD. For further information, please contact Mr Mustapha Kameyal [email protected] (Arabic and English) and Ms Yuri Taniguchi [email protected] (Japanese).   About the International Planned Parenthood Federation The International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) is a global healthcare provider and a leading advocate of sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) for all. We are a movement of 150 Member Associations and Collaborative Partners with a presence in over 146 countries. Building on a proud history of 70 years of achievement, we commit to lead a locally owned, globally connected civil society movement that provides and enables services and champions sexual and reproductive health and rights for all, especially the under-served. We advocate for a world where people are provided with the information they need to make informed decisions about their sexual health and bodies. We stand up and fight for sexual and reproductive rights, and against those who seek to deny people their human right to bodily autonomy and freedom. We deliver care that is rooted in rights, respect, and dignity - no matter what.

ACSHR
news_item

| 02 March 2024

The Japanese Ambassador Emphasizes Importance of the Tokyo International Conference for African Development (TICAD) at the ACSHR

The Japanese Ambassador Emphasizes Importance of the Tokyo International Conference for African Development (TICAD) and Reproductive Health for Advancing Human Security and Enhancing People’s Wellbeing in Africa at The 11th African Conference on Sexual Health and Rights (ACSHR) Today is the last day of the 11th African Conference on Sexual Health and Rights (ACSHR) held in Rabat, Morocco from February 26 to March 2, 2024, under the esteemed patronage of His Majesty King Mohammed VI. The conference theme is “The Sexual and Reproductive Health and Family Well-being in Africa”. As the 11th SCSHR organize committee, IPPF has been working hard jointly with its Member Association in Morocco (AMPF) and like-minded organizations such as UNFPA as driving force to make sure of the following conference objectives are met: • Take stock of responses to sexual and reproductive health and rights of women and youth in Africa; • Identify, interrogate and consolidate on best and promising SRHR policies and practices for women and youth SRHR in Africa; • Provide networking opportunities, strengthen coalitions and movements for advancing women and youth SRHR in Africa. At the Plenary Session held in the morning of the last day of the three-day conference, Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of Japan to Tunisia, H.E. Mr Takeshi Osuga made a presentation entitled ‘TICAD 8 and Japan’s Cooperation on African Continent’. After introducing TICAD's history since 1993, he explained how the SRHR have been incorporated into the TICAD Summit outcomes. He also briefed about Japan’s contribution to African development in relevant areas in partnership with IPPF and its member associations. During his speech, H.E. Mr Osuga said: "Japan will continue to invest in SRHR projects in Africa and support the advocacy efforts in support of SRHR. Whether or not SRHR will be further mainstreamed internationally and especially in Africa, in line with African Union's Agenda 2063 and the Goal 3, target 7 of the SDGs, is totally up to African countries and the civil society in each country." IPPF has participated in the TICAD process since 2006. In next year 2025, the 9th TICAD will be held in Yokohama. IPPF will continue to advocate SRHR to make it one of the core topics of the TICAD. For further information, please contact Mr Mustapha Kameyal [email protected] (Arabic and English) and Ms Yuri Taniguchi [email protected] (Japanese).   About the International Planned Parenthood Federation The International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) is a global healthcare provider and a leading advocate of sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) for all. We are a movement of 150 Member Associations and Collaborative Partners with a presence in over 146 countries. Building on a proud history of 70 years of achievement, we commit to lead a locally owned, globally connected civil society movement that provides and enables services and champions sexual and reproductive health and rights for all, especially the under-served. We advocate for a world where people are provided with the information they need to make informed decisions about their sexual health and bodies. We stand up and fight for sexual and reproductive rights, and against those who seek to deny people their human right to bodily autonomy and freedom. We deliver care that is rooted in rights, respect, and dignity - no matter what.

Sudanese woman
news item

| 27 February 2024

Government of Japan awards IPPF $1.9 million to support women and girls affected by natural disasters and conflicts around the world

With support from the Government of Japan, International Planned Parenthood Federation’s (IPPF) Member Associations in five countries, namely Afghanistan, Palestine, Sudan, Ukraine and Yemen, will provide urgent sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services to communities affected by natural disasters and conflict situations.  These IPPF Member Associations will: Provide sexual and reproductive health (SRH) and maternal and child health services for women and girls and marginalized communities in six remote and flood affected provinces in Afghanistan; Provide urgent sexual and reproductive health services to communities affected by the escalating violence in Palestine; Improve accessibility of services and community sustainability to decrease sexual and reproductive health-related mortality and morbidity of women and girls in three States with high internally-displaced populations in Sudan; Restore health facilities and access to maternal health services in conflict affected areas for populations affected by the destruction of the Kakhovka Dam in Ukraine;  Provide critical sexual, reproductive and maternal health care to internally displaced people and local communities in Yemen. This vital funding from Japan will help with provision of badly needed but currently missing health services, especially for women, so that they can live with dignity and free from unwanted pregnancies, death of themselves and their newborns, and reproductive ill-health. It will allow us to provide essential and quality SRH and maternal and child health services in the communities, prevent and manage the consequences of sexual and gender-based violence, including the clinical management of rape, equip community-based midwives with skills to provide high quality obstetric and neonatal services and strengthen health information systems to collect high quality data to respond to the needs and priorities of women and girls’ health. IPPF Director General, Dr Alvaro Bemejo, said, "I offer heartfelt thanks to the Government of Japan for their  unparalleled generosity to enable IPPF to respond to the needs of women and girls caught up in crises around the world. This generosity will allow IPPF and our local partners to provide a critical lifeline to the growing number of people in desperate need of humanitarian assistance."   By the end of December 2024, IPPF, through our local partners in the five countries, will aim to deliver health services and information to at least 239,000 people in total.   For further information, please contact Yuri Taniguchi, IPPF London Office, at [email protected].   Photo Credits: IPPF/Hannah Maule-ffinch/Sudan

Sudanese woman
news_item

| 27 February 2024

Government of Japan awards IPPF $1.9 million to support women and girls affected by natural disasters and conflicts around the world

With support from the Government of Japan, International Planned Parenthood Federation’s (IPPF) Member Associations in five countries, namely Afghanistan, Palestine, Sudan, Ukraine and Yemen, will provide urgent sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services to communities affected by natural disasters and conflict situations.  These IPPF Member Associations will: Provide sexual and reproductive health (SRH) and maternal and child health services for women and girls and marginalized communities in six remote and flood affected provinces in Afghanistan; Provide urgent sexual and reproductive health services to communities affected by the escalating violence in Palestine; Improve accessibility of services and community sustainability to decrease sexual and reproductive health-related mortality and morbidity of women and girls in three States with high internally-displaced populations in Sudan; Restore health facilities and access to maternal health services in conflict affected areas for populations affected by the destruction of the Kakhovka Dam in Ukraine;  Provide critical sexual, reproductive and maternal health care to internally displaced people and local communities in Yemen. This vital funding from Japan will help with provision of badly needed but currently missing health services, especially for women, so that they can live with dignity and free from unwanted pregnancies, death of themselves and their newborns, and reproductive ill-health. It will allow us to provide essential and quality SRH and maternal and child health services in the communities, prevent and manage the consequences of sexual and gender-based violence, including the clinical management of rape, equip community-based midwives with skills to provide high quality obstetric and neonatal services and strengthen health information systems to collect high quality data to respond to the needs and priorities of women and girls’ health. IPPF Director General, Dr Alvaro Bemejo, said, "I offer heartfelt thanks to the Government of Japan for their  unparalleled generosity to enable IPPF to respond to the needs of women and girls caught up in crises around the world. This generosity will allow IPPF and our local partners to provide a critical lifeline to the growing number of people in desperate need of humanitarian assistance."   By the end of December 2024, IPPF, through our local partners in the five countries, will aim to deliver health services and information to at least 239,000 people in total.   For further information, please contact Yuri Taniguchi, IPPF London Office, at [email protected].   Photo Credits: IPPF/Hannah Maule-ffinch/Sudan

hiv-test
news item

| 01 December 2023

IPPF marks World AIDS Day by announcing the launch of a special program to roll out new biomedical HIV prevention methods

IPPF provides comprehensive sexual and reproductive health care to clients around the world. HIV testing, prevention, and treatment services are essential parts of our integrated sexual and reproductive health care package. To expand the choices individuals have to protect themselves from HIV, IPPF is excited to announce a special program to provide the newest methods of HIV prevention - injectable PrEP (a 2-monthly injection of cabotegravir-LA) and the vaginal ring (a monthly vaginal ring of dapivirine), as well as expanding where oral PrEP is offered. This program is being launched through a consortium of IPPF Member Associations called the Consortium to Advance Access to new HIV Prevention Products (CAAPP) - led by Family Planning Association of India, and including the Family Life Association of Eswatini, Lesotho Planned Parenthood Association, Family Planning Association of Malawi, Federation of Reproductive Health Associations, Malaysia, Family Planning Association of Nepal, and Planned Parenthood Association of Thailand. We hope this program will increase access to the number of ways people can protect themselves from HIV, supporting individual's choice to find an HIV prevention method that works for them.

hiv-test
news_item

| 01 December 2023

IPPF marks World AIDS Day by announcing the launch of a special program to roll out new biomedical HIV prevention methods

IPPF provides comprehensive sexual and reproductive health care to clients around the world. HIV testing, prevention, and treatment services are essential parts of our integrated sexual and reproductive health care package. To expand the choices individuals have to protect themselves from HIV, IPPF is excited to announce a special program to provide the newest methods of HIV prevention - injectable PrEP (a 2-monthly injection of cabotegravir-LA) and the vaginal ring (a monthly vaginal ring of dapivirine), as well as expanding where oral PrEP is offered. This program is being launched through a consortium of IPPF Member Associations called the Consortium to Advance Access to new HIV Prevention Products (CAAPP) - led by Family Planning Association of India, and including the Family Life Association of Eswatini, Lesotho Planned Parenthood Association, Family Planning Association of Malawi, Federation of Reproductive Health Associations, Malaysia, Family Planning Association of Nepal, and Planned Parenthood Association of Thailand. We hope this program will increase access to the number of ways people can protect themselves from HIV, supporting individual's choice to find an HIV prevention method that works for them.