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IPPF/Tommy Trenchard

Resources

Latest resources from across the federation and our partners

Spotlight

A selection of resources from across the Federation

2023 Annual Performance Report
Resource

2023 Annual Performance Report

Last year saw a relentless assault on human rights, leaving many feeling anxious and pessimistic about the prospects for people from all walks of life to come together. It was a year of wartime atrocities livestreamed onto billions of smartphones in real time. And if climate, security and human rights fared poorly, the economy did not do much better and many countries cut their aid budgets.  Against this backdrop, we launched our new strategy, Come Together 2028.

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2023 Annual Performance Report
Resource

| 19 July 2024

2023 Annual Performance Report

Last year saw a relentless assault on human rights, leaving many feeling anxious and pessimistic about the prospects for people from all walks of life to come together. It was a year of wartime atrocities livestreamed onto billions of smartphones in real time. And if climate, security and human rights fared poorly, the economy did not do much better and many countries cut their aid budgets.  Against this backdrop, we launched our new strategy, Come Together 2028. IPPF Member Associations (MAs) were still able to deliver a total of 222.4 million sexual and reproductive health services during 2023. We served 71.2 million clients. Pretty impressive in such a challenging year in which we embarked on our new strategy.  Read more by downloading the 2023 IPPF Annual Performance Report. 

2023 Annual Performance Report
Resource

| 19 July 2024

2023 Annual Performance Report

Last year saw a relentless assault on human rights, leaving many feeling anxious and pessimistic about the prospects for people from all walks of life to come together. It was a year of wartime atrocities livestreamed onto billions of smartphones in real time. And if climate, security and human rights fared poorly, the economy did not do much better and many countries cut their aid budgets.  Against this backdrop, we launched our new strategy, Come Together 2028. IPPF Member Associations (MAs) were still able to deliver a total of 222.4 million sexual and reproductive health services during 2023. We served 71.2 million clients. Pretty impressive in such a challenging year in which we embarked on our new strategy.  Read more by downloading the 2023 IPPF Annual Performance Report. 

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Resource

| 08 July 2024

IMAP Statement on Menopause

What is menopause? Menopause is a retrospective diagnosis: it is defined after a woman or person who can menstruate is amenorrheic for 12 months. At this time, estrogen levels are diminished, the ovaries no longer ovulate and spontaneous conception is no longer possible. The average age of the final menstrual period (FMP) is between 46-52 years of age globally. Early menopause occurs between the ages of 40-45 and premature ovarian insufficiency refers to menopause occurring spontaneously before 40 years of age. Of note, although most professional societies define menopause occurring following 12 months of amenorrhea, the United Kingdom Faculty of Sexual and Reproductive Health defines it as 12 months in people over the age of 50 years of age and 24 months in those between 40-50 years of age. The menopause transition is the start of menopausal symptoms and/or menstrual irregularities until the FMP. Perimenopause includes the menopause transition, during which time contraception may continue to be needed, and one year after the FMP, when menopause is officially diagnosed. Both menopause and perimenopause are a time of great transition. Perimenopause is associated with significant hormonal fluctuations with an eventual reduction in ovarian estrogen production. In the initial years after the FMP, estrogen levels may still fluctuate but, over time, will diminish to a persistent low estrogen state. These hormonal changes can have significant physical, emotional, and mental effects. Menopause occurs naturally but other types exist. Surgical menopause occurs when both ovaries are surgically removed. Menopause can also be induced after medical treatments, such as with chemotherapy, that result in cessation of ovarian function which may be permanent or reversible. Globally, life expectancy is increasing, albeit varying by geographical location. Some people may spend decades in perimenopause and menopause. Often the needs of those in perimenopause/menopause are unmet; recognizing and addressing these needs are essential to ensure the health and wellness of this often-overlooked population. Purpose of the Statement The purpose of this statement is to define the health impact of perimenopause and menopause and review therapeutic options to address the healthcare needs of this population.

blue background
Resource

| 08 July 2024

IMAP Statement on Menopause

What is menopause? Menopause is a retrospective diagnosis: it is defined after a woman or person who can menstruate is amenorrheic for 12 months. At this time, estrogen levels are diminished, the ovaries no longer ovulate and spontaneous conception is no longer possible. The average age of the final menstrual period (FMP) is between 46-52 years of age globally. Early menopause occurs between the ages of 40-45 and premature ovarian insufficiency refers to menopause occurring spontaneously before 40 years of age. Of note, although most professional societies define menopause occurring following 12 months of amenorrhea, the United Kingdom Faculty of Sexual and Reproductive Health defines it as 12 months in people over the age of 50 years of age and 24 months in those between 40-50 years of age. The menopause transition is the start of menopausal symptoms and/or menstrual irregularities until the FMP. Perimenopause includes the menopause transition, during which time contraception may continue to be needed, and one year after the FMP, when menopause is officially diagnosed. Both menopause and perimenopause are a time of great transition. Perimenopause is associated with significant hormonal fluctuations with an eventual reduction in ovarian estrogen production. In the initial years after the FMP, estrogen levels may still fluctuate but, over time, will diminish to a persistent low estrogen state. These hormonal changes can have significant physical, emotional, and mental effects. Menopause occurs naturally but other types exist. Surgical menopause occurs when both ovaries are surgically removed. Menopause can also be induced after medical treatments, such as with chemotherapy, that result in cessation of ovarian function which may be permanent or reversible. Globally, life expectancy is increasing, albeit varying by geographical location. Some people may spend decades in perimenopause and menopause. Often the needs of those in perimenopause/menopause are unmet; recognizing and addressing these needs are essential to ensure the health and wellness of this often-overlooked population. Purpose of the Statement The purpose of this statement is to define the health impact of perimenopause and menopause and review therapeutic options to address the healthcare needs of this population.

IPPF in 2023: Annual Report and Financial Statement
Resource

| 28 June 2024

IPPF in 2023: Annual Report and Financial Statement

The year 2023 was challenging in so many ways! It was the year of human rights suppression and wartime atrocities live-streamed onto billions of smartphones in real time. Selective government outrage and transactional diplomacy. Right-wing populists with loose lips who care little about the impact of their words on the human rights of ordinary citizens. And an increasingly dysfunctional, ungovernable United Nations, leading to fragmentation, an “each country for itself” attitude and issue-specific alliances. Renewed hostilities between Israel and Hamas, war crimes in Gaza and Sudan and ongoing conflicts in Ukraine, Myanmar, Ethiopia, and the Sahel caused tremendous suffering. Governments struggled to deal with what is likely to be confirmed as the hottest year on record and the onslaught of wildfires, drought, cyclones and storms wreaked havoc on millions of people in Bangladesh, Libya, Australia and Canada. And if climate, security and human rights are faring poorly, the economy did not do much better. As the world nears the midpoint of what was intended to be a transformative decade for development, all we have to show is the slowest half-decade of GDP growth in 30 years. All with growing inequality: The richest 1% grabbed nearly two-thirds of all new wealth created since 2020, almost twice as much money as the bottom 99% of the world’s population. Across regions, autocrats have worked to erode the independence of key institutions vital for protecting human rights and shrink the space for expressions of dissent with the same end game in mind: to exercise power without constraint. The rights of women and girls and LGBTQI+ communities faced harsh backlashes in many places, exemplified by the Taliban’s gender persecution in Afghanistan and the approval of a Ugandan Anti-Homosexuality Act with the death penalty for “aggravated homosexuality”. Gender violence persists in the home and by the hands of the state, unabated and unchecked. Against that backdrop, the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) implemented the first year of its new six-year strategic period. We did not rest. As you will read in this report, Foreword from the Director General 04 | Foreword we delivered person-centred care and we agitated for sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) and justice for women, girls and marginalized populations. We reached even more people requiring potentially lifesaving SRHR services in humanitarian crises. We built exciting partnerships. We mobilized voters and they turned up at polls, in Poland, in Spain and elsewhere to vote for their sexual and reproductive rights. We worked to define our values and shape a new brand. And the Secretariat underwent a much-needed transformation to better align with the strategy. Once again, IPPF has proven itself delivering sexual and reproductive health services to those excluded and marginalized in many societies, and those experiencing humanitarian crises. It has also demonstrated its resilience and passion; I am in awe of the expertise and courage of our frontline healthcare workers and activists. A year of transition from one strategy to the next is always tight. Many (core and restricted) contracts come to an end and new ones get delayed, particularly in the current economic and political environment. Huge thanks to the many close allies for steadfast support to IPPF. We ended the year with a strong financial position. Thank you for believing in the journey we are on, shaping the future of sexual and reproductive healthcare and progressing the most intimate of rights. We are coming together! Alvaro Bermejo, Director General

IPPF in 2023: Annual Report and Financial Statement
Resource

| 28 June 2024

IPPF in 2023: Annual Report and Financial Statement

The year 2023 was challenging in so many ways! It was the year of human rights suppression and wartime atrocities live-streamed onto billions of smartphones in real time. Selective government outrage and transactional diplomacy. Right-wing populists with loose lips who care little about the impact of their words on the human rights of ordinary citizens. And an increasingly dysfunctional, ungovernable United Nations, leading to fragmentation, an “each country for itself” attitude and issue-specific alliances. Renewed hostilities between Israel and Hamas, war crimes in Gaza and Sudan and ongoing conflicts in Ukraine, Myanmar, Ethiopia, and the Sahel caused tremendous suffering. Governments struggled to deal with what is likely to be confirmed as the hottest year on record and the onslaught of wildfires, drought, cyclones and storms wreaked havoc on millions of people in Bangladesh, Libya, Australia and Canada. And if climate, security and human rights are faring poorly, the economy did not do much better. As the world nears the midpoint of what was intended to be a transformative decade for development, all we have to show is the slowest half-decade of GDP growth in 30 years. All with growing inequality: The richest 1% grabbed nearly two-thirds of all new wealth created since 2020, almost twice as much money as the bottom 99% of the world’s population. Across regions, autocrats have worked to erode the independence of key institutions vital for protecting human rights and shrink the space for expressions of dissent with the same end game in mind: to exercise power without constraint. The rights of women and girls and LGBTQI+ communities faced harsh backlashes in many places, exemplified by the Taliban’s gender persecution in Afghanistan and the approval of a Ugandan Anti-Homosexuality Act with the death penalty for “aggravated homosexuality”. Gender violence persists in the home and by the hands of the state, unabated and unchecked. Against that backdrop, the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) implemented the first year of its new six-year strategic period. We did not rest. As you will read in this report, Foreword from the Director General 04 | Foreword we delivered person-centred care and we agitated for sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) and justice for women, girls and marginalized populations. We reached even more people requiring potentially lifesaving SRHR services in humanitarian crises. We built exciting partnerships. We mobilized voters and they turned up at polls, in Poland, in Spain and elsewhere to vote for their sexual and reproductive rights. We worked to define our values and shape a new brand. And the Secretariat underwent a much-needed transformation to better align with the strategy. Once again, IPPF has proven itself delivering sexual and reproductive health services to those excluded and marginalized in many societies, and those experiencing humanitarian crises. It has also demonstrated its resilience and passion; I am in awe of the expertise and courage of our frontline healthcare workers and activists. A year of transition from one strategy to the next is always tight. Many (core and restricted) contracts come to an end and new ones get delayed, particularly in the current economic and political environment. Huge thanks to the many close allies for steadfast support to IPPF. We ended the year with a strong financial position. Thank you for believing in the journey we are on, shaping the future of sexual and reproductive healthcare and progressing the most intimate of rights. We are coming together! Alvaro Bermejo, Director General

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Resource

| 22 May 2024

IMAP Statement on Person-centred Care for Sexually Transmitted Infections

Recognizing the significant global impact of sexually transmitted infections (STIs), this statement affirms IPPF’s commitment to people-centred STI care as a critical aspect of comprehensive sexual and reproductive health and well-being. A holistic approach to sexual and reproductive health and rights acknowledges that true sexual and reproductive well-being extends beyond the prevention and treatment of diseases. It emphasizes the importance of promoting healthy, satisfying sexual and reproductive experiences. This includes advocating for personcentred care, encouraging self-care strategies, and supporting the development of innovative healthcare delivery models tailored to meet the diverse needs of individuals in various circumstances and contexts, particularly reaching those who are often excluded and marginalized. This statement updates the latest information on STIs. It provides practical recommendations for IPPF Member Associations on how to develop a comprehensive, people-centred approach to STI care, emphasizing integrated services, adherence to guidelines, rights-based care, community engagement, advocacy, and a positive perspective on sexual health and well-being.

blue background
Resource

| 22 May 2024

IMAP Statement on Person-centred Care for Sexually Transmitted Infections

Recognizing the significant global impact of sexually transmitted infections (STIs), this statement affirms IPPF’s commitment to people-centred STI care as a critical aspect of comprehensive sexual and reproductive health and well-being. A holistic approach to sexual and reproductive health and rights acknowledges that true sexual and reproductive well-being extends beyond the prevention and treatment of diseases. It emphasizes the importance of promoting healthy, satisfying sexual and reproductive experiences. This includes advocating for personcentred care, encouraging self-care strategies, and supporting the development of innovative healthcare delivery models tailored to meet the diverse needs of individuals in various circumstances and contexts, particularly reaching those who are often excluded and marginalized. This statement updates the latest information on STIs. It provides practical recommendations for IPPF Member Associations on how to develop a comprehensive, people-centred approach to STI care, emphasizing integrated services, adherence to guidelines, rights-based care, community engagement, advocacy, and a positive perspective on sexual health and well-being.

IPPF Humanitarian Sudan
Resource

| 01 February 2024

U.S. 990 2022

IPPF Humanitarian Sudan
Resource

| 01 February 2024

U.S. 990 2022

HIV
Resource

| 20 November 2023

HIV Theory of Change

Background IPPF offers a comprehensive approach to sexual and reproductive health and rights through its Integrated Package of Essential Services (IPES) which is offered at affiliate service delivery points. The IPES includes HIV testing, HIV prevention, HIV care and treatment, services for sexually transmitted infections and reproductive tract infections, contraception, abortion care, obstetrics and gynaecology, fertility support, and support for sexual and gender-based violence Purpose The purpose of our HIV Theory of Change is to clarify the goals and vision of IPPF’s HIV programme and to articulate the different pathways and strategies IPPF uses to contribute towards its HIV goals and vision. This Theory of Change endeavours to represent a conceptual model that is complex and non-linear in the format of a readable diagram. Therefore, this Theory of Change diagram is a simplified representation of a complex process which cannot be fully captured in this format. Our Theory of Change describes causal pathways for how the work in our HIV programme contributes to the ultimate goals and vision. The purpose of this conceptual model is not to provide a detailed description of the components of our HIV services, as these are described in the 2020 ‘IPPF Comprehensive HIV Services Package’ and the IPPF 2022 ‘Client-centred-clinical guidelines for sexual and reproductive health care’. Reading the diagram Our Theory of Change diagram is read from left to right, representing movement in time from the world we currently live in (left side) towards the future we would like to see, which is represented by our vision (right side). There are 7 pathways (page 1), each with a set of strategies (shown on pages 4 and 5 as close-ups of the diagram), whose work contributes towards achieving our HIV goals and vision. The 7 pathways are divided into cross-cutting pathways (community engagement, evidence and learning, capacity strengthening and sharing, strategic partnership building) and core pathways (advocacy, empowerment, comprehensive service delivery). The cross-cutting pathways are iterative and intersecting, contributing to each other and collectively contributing to the 3 core pathways. The core pathways represent the 3 main areas of our HIV programme, which, like all elements of the diagram, also interact with each other synergistically. The strategies of all 7 pathways working together contribute towards a set of outcomes. The outcomes interacting together contribute towards our goals, which in turn interact with each other, and contribute towards our ultimate vision.

HIV
Resource

| 20 November 2023

HIV Theory of Change

Background IPPF offers a comprehensive approach to sexual and reproductive health and rights through its Integrated Package of Essential Services (IPES) which is offered at affiliate service delivery points. The IPES includes HIV testing, HIV prevention, HIV care and treatment, services for sexually transmitted infections and reproductive tract infections, contraception, abortion care, obstetrics and gynaecology, fertility support, and support for sexual and gender-based violence Purpose The purpose of our HIV Theory of Change is to clarify the goals and vision of IPPF’s HIV programme and to articulate the different pathways and strategies IPPF uses to contribute towards its HIV goals and vision. This Theory of Change endeavours to represent a conceptual model that is complex and non-linear in the format of a readable diagram. Therefore, this Theory of Change diagram is a simplified representation of a complex process which cannot be fully captured in this format. Our Theory of Change describes causal pathways for how the work in our HIV programme contributes to the ultimate goals and vision. The purpose of this conceptual model is not to provide a detailed description of the components of our HIV services, as these are described in the 2020 ‘IPPF Comprehensive HIV Services Package’ and the IPPF 2022 ‘Client-centred-clinical guidelines for sexual and reproductive health care’. Reading the diagram Our Theory of Change diagram is read from left to right, representing movement in time from the world we currently live in (left side) towards the future we would like to see, which is represented by our vision (right side). There are 7 pathways (page 1), each with a set of strategies (shown on pages 4 and 5 as close-ups of the diagram), whose work contributes towards achieving our HIV goals and vision. The 7 pathways are divided into cross-cutting pathways (community engagement, evidence and learning, capacity strengthening and sharing, strategic partnership building) and core pathways (advocacy, empowerment, comprehensive service delivery). The cross-cutting pathways are iterative and intersecting, contributing to each other and collectively contributing to the 3 core pathways. The core pathways represent the 3 main areas of our HIV programme, which, like all elements of the diagram, also interact with each other synergistically. The strategies of all 7 pathways working together contribute towards a set of outcomes. The outcomes interacting together contribute towards our goals, which in turn interact with each other, and contribute towards our ultimate vision.

2023 Annual Performance Report
Resource

| 19 July 2024

2023 Annual Performance Report

Last year saw a relentless assault on human rights, leaving many feeling anxious and pessimistic about the prospects for people from all walks of life to come together. It was a year of wartime atrocities livestreamed onto billions of smartphones in real time. And if climate, security and human rights fared poorly, the economy did not do much better and many countries cut their aid budgets.  Against this backdrop, we launched our new strategy, Come Together 2028. IPPF Member Associations (MAs) were still able to deliver a total of 222.4 million sexual and reproductive health services during 2023. We served 71.2 million clients. Pretty impressive in such a challenging year in which we embarked on our new strategy.  Read more by downloading the 2023 IPPF Annual Performance Report. 

2023 Annual Performance Report
Resource

| 19 July 2024

2023 Annual Performance Report

Last year saw a relentless assault on human rights, leaving many feeling anxious and pessimistic about the prospects for people from all walks of life to come together. It was a year of wartime atrocities livestreamed onto billions of smartphones in real time. And if climate, security and human rights fared poorly, the economy did not do much better and many countries cut their aid budgets.  Against this backdrop, we launched our new strategy, Come Together 2028. IPPF Member Associations (MAs) were still able to deliver a total of 222.4 million sexual and reproductive health services during 2023. We served 71.2 million clients. Pretty impressive in such a challenging year in which we embarked on our new strategy.  Read more by downloading the 2023 IPPF Annual Performance Report. 

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Resource

| 08 July 2024

IMAP Statement on Menopause

What is menopause? Menopause is a retrospective diagnosis: it is defined after a woman or person who can menstruate is amenorrheic for 12 months. At this time, estrogen levels are diminished, the ovaries no longer ovulate and spontaneous conception is no longer possible. The average age of the final menstrual period (FMP) is between 46-52 years of age globally. Early menopause occurs between the ages of 40-45 and premature ovarian insufficiency refers to menopause occurring spontaneously before 40 years of age. Of note, although most professional societies define menopause occurring following 12 months of amenorrhea, the United Kingdom Faculty of Sexual and Reproductive Health defines it as 12 months in people over the age of 50 years of age and 24 months in those between 40-50 years of age. The menopause transition is the start of menopausal symptoms and/or menstrual irregularities until the FMP. Perimenopause includes the menopause transition, during which time contraception may continue to be needed, and one year after the FMP, when menopause is officially diagnosed. Both menopause and perimenopause are a time of great transition. Perimenopause is associated with significant hormonal fluctuations with an eventual reduction in ovarian estrogen production. In the initial years after the FMP, estrogen levels may still fluctuate but, over time, will diminish to a persistent low estrogen state. These hormonal changes can have significant physical, emotional, and mental effects. Menopause occurs naturally but other types exist. Surgical menopause occurs when both ovaries are surgically removed. Menopause can also be induced after medical treatments, such as with chemotherapy, that result in cessation of ovarian function which may be permanent or reversible. Globally, life expectancy is increasing, albeit varying by geographical location. Some people may spend decades in perimenopause and menopause. Often the needs of those in perimenopause/menopause are unmet; recognizing and addressing these needs are essential to ensure the health and wellness of this often-overlooked population. Purpose of the Statement The purpose of this statement is to define the health impact of perimenopause and menopause and review therapeutic options to address the healthcare needs of this population.

blue background
Resource

| 08 July 2024

IMAP Statement on Menopause

What is menopause? Menopause is a retrospective diagnosis: it is defined after a woman or person who can menstruate is amenorrheic for 12 months. At this time, estrogen levels are diminished, the ovaries no longer ovulate and spontaneous conception is no longer possible. The average age of the final menstrual period (FMP) is between 46-52 years of age globally. Early menopause occurs between the ages of 40-45 and premature ovarian insufficiency refers to menopause occurring spontaneously before 40 years of age. Of note, although most professional societies define menopause occurring following 12 months of amenorrhea, the United Kingdom Faculty of Sexual and Reproductive Health defines it as 12 months in people over the age of 50 years of age and 24 months in those between 40-50 years of age. The menopause transition is the start of menopausal symptoms and/or menstrual irregularities until the FMP. Perimenopause includes the menopause transition, during which time contraception may continue to be needed, and one year after the FMP, when menopause is officially diagnosed. Both menopause and perimenopause are a time of great transition. Perimenopause is associated with significant hormonal fluctuations with an eventual reduction in ovarian estrogen production. In the initial years after the FMP, estrogen levels may still fluctuate but, over time, will diminish to a persistent low estrogen state. These hormonal changes can have significant physical, emotional, and mental effects. Menopause occurs naturally but other types exist. Surgical menopause occurs when both ovaries are surgically removed. Menopause can also be induced after medical treatments, such as with chemotherapy, that result in cessation of ovarian function which may be permanent or reversible. Globally, life expectancy is increasing, albeit varying by geographical location. Some people may spend decades in perimenopause and menopause. Often the needs of those in perimenopause/menopause are unmet; recognizing and addressing these needs are essential to ensure the health and wellness of this often-overlooked population. Purpose of the Statement The purpose of this statement is to define the health impact of perimenopause and menopause and review therapeutic options to address the healthcare needs of this population.

IPPF in 2023: Annual Report and Financial Statement
Resource

| 28 June 2024

IPPF in 2023: Annual Report and Financial Statement

The year 2023 was challenging in so many ways! It was the year of human rights suppression and wartime atrocities live-streamed onto billions of smartphones in real time. Selective government outrage and transactional diplomacy. Right-wing populists with loose lips who care little about the impact of their words on the human rights of ordinary citizens. And an increasingly dysfunctional, ungovernable United Nations, leading to fragmentation, an “each country for itself” attitude and issue-specific alliances. Renewed hostilities between Israel and Hamas, war crimes in Gaza and Sudan and ongoing conflicts in Ukraine, Myanmar, Ethiopia, and the Sahel caused tremendous suffering. Governments struggled to deal with what is likely to be confirmed as the hottest year on record and the onslaught of wildfires, drought, cyclones and storms wreaked havoc on millions of people in Bangladesh, Libya, Australia and Canada. And if climate, security and human rights are faring poorly, the economy did not do much better. As the world nears the midpoint of what was intended to be a transformative decade for development, all we have to show is the slowest half-decade of GDP growth in 30 years. All with growing inequality: The richest 1% grabbed nearly two-thirds of all new wealth created since 2020, almost twice as much money as the bottom 99% of the world’s population. Across regions, autocrats have worked to erode the independence of key institutions vital for protecting human rights and shrink the space for expressions of dissent with the same end game in mind: to exercise power without constraint. The rights of women and girls and LGBTQI+ communities faced harsh backlashes in many places, exemplified by the Taliban’s gender persecution in Afghanistan and the approval of a Ugandan Anti-Homosexuality Act with the death penalty for “aggravated homosexuality”. Gender violence persists in the home and by the hands of the state, unabated and unchecked. Against that backdrop, the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) implemented the first year of its new six-year strategic period. We did not rest. As you will read in this report, Foreword from the Director General 04 | Foreword we delivered person-centred care and we agitated for sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) and justice for women, girls and marginalized populations. We reached even more people requiring potentially lifesaving SRHR services in humanitarian crises. We built exciting partnerships. We mobilized voters and they turned up at polls, in Poland, in Spain and elsewhere to vote for their sexual and reproductive rights. We worked to define our values and shape a new brand. And the Secretariat underwent a much-needed transformation to better align with the strategy. Once again, IPPF has proven itself delivering sexual and reproductive health services to those excluded and marginalized in many societies, and those experiencing humanitarian crises. It has also demonstrated its resilience and passion; I am in awe of the expertise and courage of our frontline healthcare workers and activists. A year of transition from one strategy to the next is always tight. Many (core and restricted) contracts come to an end and new ones get delayed, particularly in the current economic and political environment. Huge thanks to the many close allies for steadfast support to IPPF. We ended the year with a strong financial position. Thank you for believing in the journey we are on, shaping the future of sexual and reproductive healthcare and progressing the most intimate of rights. We are coming together! Alvaro Bermejo, Director General

IPPF in 2023: Annual Report and Financial Statement
Resource

| 28 June 2024

IPPF in 2023: Annual Report and Financial Statement

The year 2023 was challenging in so many ways! It was the year of human rights suppression and wartime atrocities live-streamed onto billions of smartphones in real time. Selective government outrage and transactional diplomacy. Right-wing populists with loose lips who care little about the impact of their words on the human rights of ordinary citizens. And an increasingly dysfunctional, ungovernable United Nations, leading to fragmentation, an “each country for itself” attitude and issue-specific alliances. Renewed hostilities between Israel and Hamas, war crimes in Gaza and Sudan and ongoing conflicts in Ukraine, Myanmar, Ethiopia, and the Sahel caused tremendous suffering. Governments struggled to deal with what is likely to be confirmed as the hottest year on record and the onslaught of wildfires, drought, cyclones and storms wreaked havoc on millions of people in Bangladesh, Libya, Australia and Canada. And if climate, security and human rights are faring poorly, the economy did not do much better. As the world nears the midpoint of what was intended to be a transformative decade for development, all we have to show is the slowest half-decade of GDP growth in 30 years. All with growing inequality: The richest 1% grabbed nearly two-thirds of all new wealth created since 2020, almost twice as much money as the bottom 99% of the world’s population. Across regions, autocrats have worked to erode the independence of key institutions vital for protecting human rights and shrink the space for expressions of dissent with the same end game in mind: to exercise power without constraint. The rights of women and girls and LGBTQI+ communities faced harsh backlashes in many places, exemplified by the Taliban’s gender persecution in Afghanistan and the approval of a Ugandan Anti-Homosexuality Act with the death penalty for “aggravated homosexuality”. Gender violence persists in the home and by the hands of the state, unabated and unchecked. Against that backdrop, the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) implemented the first year of its new six-year strategic period. We did not rest. As you will read in this report, Foreword from the Director General 04 | Foreword we delivered person-centred care and we agitated for sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) and justice for women, girls and marginalized populations. We reached even more people requiring potentially lifesaving SRHR services in humanitarian crises. We built exciting partnerships. We mobilized voters and they turned up at polls, in Poland, in Spain and elsewhere to vote for their sexual and reproductive rights. We worked to define our values and shape a new brand. And the Secretariat underwent a much-needed transformation to better align with the strategy. Once again, IPPF has proven itself delivering sexual and reproductive health services to those excluded and marginalized in many societies, and those experiencing humanitarian crises. It has also demonstrated its resilience and passion; I am in awe of the expertise and courage of our frontline healthcare workers and activists. A year of transition from one strategy to the next is always tight. Many (core and restricted) contracts come to an end and new ones get delayed, particularly in the current economic and political environment. Huge thanks to the many close allies for steadfast support to IPPF. We ended the year with a strong financial position. Thank you for believing in the journey we are on, shaping the future of sexual and reproductive healthcare and progressing the most intimate of rights. We are coming together! Alvaro Bermejo, Director General

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Resource

| 22 May 2024

IMAP Statement on Person-centred Care for Sexually Transmitted Infections

Recognizing the significant global impact of sexually transmitted infections (STIs), this statement affirms IPPF’s commitment to people-centred STI care as a critical aspect of comprehensive sexual and reproductive health and well-being. A holistic approach to sexual and reproductive health and rights acknowledges that true sexual and reproductive well-being extends beyond the prevention and treatment of diseases. It emphasizes the importance of promoting healthy, satisfying sexual and reproductive experiences. This includes advocating for personcentred care, encouraging self-care strategies, and supporting the development of innovative healthcare delivery models tailored to meet the diverse needs of individuals in various circumstances and contexts, particularly reaching those who are often excluded and marginalized. This statement updates the latest information on STIs. It provides practical recommendations for IPPF Member Associations on how to develop a comprehensive, people-centred approach to STI care, emphasizing integrated services, adherence to guidelines, rights-based care, community engagement, advocacy, and a positive perspective on sexual health and well-being.

blue background
Resource

| 22 May 2024

IMAP Statement on Person-centred Care for Sexually Transmitted Infections

Recognizing the significant global impact of sexually transmitted infections (STIs), this statement affirms IPPF’s commitment to people-centred STI care as a critical aspect of comprehensive sexual and reproductive health and well-being. A holistic approach to sexual and reproductive health and rights acknowledges that true sexual and reproductive well-being extends beyond the prevention and treatment of diseases. It emphasizes the importance of promoting healthy, satisfying sexual and reproductive experiences. This includes advocating for personcentred care, encouraging self-care strategies, and supporting the development of innovative healthcare delivery models tailored to meet the diverse needs of individuals in various circumstances and contexts, particularly reaching those who are often excluded and marginalized. This statement updates the latest information on STIs. It provides practical recommendations for IPPF Member Associations on how to develop a comprehensive, people-centred approach to STI care, emphasizing integrated services, adherence to guidelines, rights-based care, community engagement, advocacy, and a positive perspective on sexual health and well-being.

IPPF Humanitarian Sudan
Resource

| 01 February 2024

U.S. 990 2022

IPPF Humanitarian Sudan
Resource

| 01 February 2024

U.S. 990 2022

HIV
Resource

| 20 November 2023

HIV Theory of Change

Background IPPF offers a comprehensive approach to sexual and reproductive health and rights through its Integrated Package of Essential Services (IPES) which is offered at affiliate service delivery points. The IPES includes HIV testing, HIV prevention, HIV care and treatment, services for sexually transmitted infections and reproductive tract infections, contraception, abortion care, obstetrics and gynaecology, fertility support, and support for sexual and gender-based violence Purpose The purpose of our HIV Theory of Change is to clarify the goals and vision of IPPF’s HIV programme and to articulate the different pathways and strategies IPPF uses to contribute towards its HIV goals and vision. This Theory of Change endeavours to represent a conceptual model that is complex and non-linear in the format of a readable diagram. Therefore, this Theory of Change diagram is a simplified representation of a complex process which cannot be fully captured in this format. Our Theory of Change describes causal pathways for how the work in our HIV programme contributes to the ultimate goals and vision. The purpose of this conceptual model is not to provide a detailed description of the components of our HIV services, as these are described in the 2020 ‘IPPF Comprehensive HIV Services Package’ and the IPPF 2022 ‘Client-centred-clinical guidelines for sexual and reproductive health care’. Reading the diagram Our Theory of Change diagram is read from left to right, representing movement in time from the world we currently live in (left side) towards the future we would like to see, which is represented by our vision (right side). There are 7 pathways (page 1), each with a set of strategies (shown on pages 4 and 5 as close-ups of the diagram), whose work contributes towards achieving our HIV goals and vision. The 7 pathways are divided into cross-cutting pathways (community engagement, evidence and learning, capacity strengthening and sharing, strategic partnership building) and core pathways (advocacy, empowerment, comprehensive service delivery). The cross-cutting pathways are iterative and intersecting, contributing to each other and collectively contributing to the 3 core pathways. The core pathways represent the 3 main areas of our HIV programme, which, like all elements of the diagram, also interact with each other synergistically. The strategies of all 7 pathways working together contribute towards a set of outcomes. The outcomes interacting together contribute towards our goals, which in turn interact with each other, and contribute towards our ultimate vision.

HIV
Resource

| 20 November 2023

HIV Theory of Change

Background IPPF offers a comprehensive approach to sexual and reproductive health and rights through its Integrated Package of Essential Services (IPES) which is offered at affiliate service delivery points. The IPES includes HIV testing, HIV prevention, HIV care and treatment, services for sexually transmitted infections and reproductive tract infections, contraception, abortion care, obstetrics and gynaecology, fertility support, and support for sexual and gender-based violence Purpose The purpose of our HIV Theory of Change is to clarify the goals and vision of IPPF’s HIV programme and to articulate the different pathways and strategies IPPF uses to contribute towards its HIV goals and vision. This Theory of Change endeavours to represent a conceptual model that is complex and non-linear in the format of a readable diagram. Therefore, this Theory of Change diagram is a simplified representation of a complex process which cannot be fully captured in this format. Our Theory of Change describes causal pathways for how the work in our HIV programme contributes to the ultimate goals and vision. The purpose of this conceptual model is not to provide a detailed description of the components of our HIV services, as these are described in the 2020 ‘IPPF Comprehensive HIV Services Package’ and the IPPF 2022 ‘Client-centred-clinical guidelines for sexual and reproductive health care’. Reading the diagram Our Theory of Change diagram is read from left to right, representing movement in time from the world we currently live in (left side) towards the future we would like to see, which is represented by our vision (right side). There are 7 pathways (page 1), each with a set of strategies (shown on pages 4 and 5 as close-ups of the diagram), whose work contributes towards achieving our HIV goals and vision. The 7 pathways are divided into cross-cutting pathways (community engagement, evidence and learning, capacity strengthening and sharing, strategic partnership building) and core pathways (advocacy, empowerment, comprehensive service delivery). The cross-cutting pathways are iterative and intersecting, contributing to each other and collectively contributing to the 3 core pathways. The core pathways represent the 3 main areas of our HIV programme, which, like all elements of the diagram, also interact with each other synergistically. The strategies of all 7 pathways working together contribute towards a set of outcomes. The outcomes interacting together contribute towards our goals, which in turn interact with each other, and contribute towards our ultimate vision.