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IPPF/Tommy Trenchard

Resources

Latest resources from across the federation and our partners

Spotlight

A selection of resources from across the Federation

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Resource

IMAP Statement on Person-centred Care for Sexually Transmitted Infections

This statement affirms IPPF’s commitment to people-centred STI care as a critical aspect of comprehensive sexual and reproductive health and well-being.

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Resource

| 22 May 2024

IMAP Statement on Person-centred Care for Sexually Transmitted Infections

Recognizing the significant global impact of sexually transmitted infections (STIs), this statement affirms IPPF’s commitment to people-centred STI care as a critical aspect of comprehensive sexual and reproductive health and well-being. A holistic approach to sexual and reproductive health and rights acknowledges that true sexual and reproductive well-being extends beyond the prevention and treatment of diseases. It emphasizes the importance of promoting healthy, satisfying sexual and reproductive experiences. This includes advocating for personcentred care, encouraging self-care strategies, and supporting the development of innovative healthcare delivery models tailored to meet the diverse needs of individuals in various circumstances and contexts, particularly reaching those who are often excluded and marginalized. This statement updates the latest information on STIs. It provides practical recommendations for IPPF Member Associations on how to develop a comprehensive, people-centred approach to STI care, emphasizing integrated services, adherence to guidelines, rights-based care, community engagement, advocacy, and a positive perspective on sexual health and well-being.

blue background
Resource

| 22 May 2024

IMAP Statement on Person-centred Care for Sexually Transmitted Infections

Recognizing the significant global impact of sexually transmitted infections (STIs), this statement affirms IPPF’s commitment to people-centred STI care as a critical aspect of comprehensive sexual and reproductive health and well-being. A holistic approach to sexual and reproductive health and rights acknowledges that true sexual and reproductive well-being extends beyond the prevention and treatment of diseases. It emphasizes the importance of promoting healthy, satisfying sexual and reproductive experiences. This includes advocating for personcentred care, encouraging self-care strategies, and supporting the development of innovative healthcare delivery models tailored to meet the diverse needs of individuals in various circumstances and contexts, particularly reaching those who are often excluded and marginalized. This statement updates the latest information on STIs. It provides practical recommendations for IPPF Member Associations on how to develop a comprehensive, people-centred approach to STI care, emphasizing integrated services, adherence to guidelines, rights-based care, community engagement, advocacy, and a positive perspective on sexual health and well-being.

IPPF Humanitarian Sudan
Resource

| 01 February 2024

U.S. 990 2022

IPPF Humanitarian Sudan
Resource

| 01 February 2024

U.S. 990 2022

HIV
Resource

| 20 November 2023

HIV Theory of Change

Background IPPF offers a comprehensive approach to sexual and reproductive health and rights through its Integrated Package of Essential Services (IPES) which is offered at affiliate service delivery points. The IPES includes HIV testing, HIV prevention, HIV care and treatment, services for sexually transmitted infections and reproductive tract infections, contraception, abortion care, obstetrics and gynaecology, fertility support, and support for sexual and gender-based violence Purpose The purpose of our HIV Theory of Change is to clarify the goals and vision of IPPF’s HIV programme and to articulate the different pathways and strategies IPPF uses to contribute towards its HIV goals and vision. This Theory of Change endeavours to represent a conceptual model that is complex and non-linear in the format of a readable diagram. Therefore, this Theory of Change diagram is a simplified representation of a complex process which cannot be fully captured in this format. Our Theory of Change describes causal pathways for how the work in our HIV programme contributes to the ultimate goals and vision. The purpose of this conceptual model is not to provide a detailed description of the components of our HIV services, as these are described in the 2020 ‘IPPF Comprehensive HIV Services Package’ and the IPPF 2022 ‘Client-centred-clinical guidelines for sexual and reproductive health care’. Reading the diagram Our Theory of Change diagram is read from left to right, representing movement in time from the world we currently live in (left side) towards the future we would like to see, which is represented by our vision (right side). There are 7 pathways (page 1), each with a set of strategies (shown on pages 4 and 5 as close-ups of the diagram), whose work contributes towards achieving our HIV goals and vision. The 7 pathways are divided into cross-cutting pathways (community engagement, evidence and learning, capacity strengthening and sharing, strategic partnership building) and core pathways (advocacy, empowerment, comprehensive service delivery). The cross-cutting pathways are iterative and intersecting, contributing to each other and collectively contributing to the 3 core pathways. The core pathways represent the 3 main areas of our HIV programme, which, like all elements of the diagram, also interact with each other synergistically. The strategies of all 7 pathways working together contribute towards a set of outcomes. The outcomes interacting together contribute towards our goals, which in turn interact with each other, and contribute towards our ultimate vision.

HIV
Resource

| 20 November 2023

HIV Theory of Change

Background IPPF offers a comprehensive approach to sexual and reproductive health and rights through its Integrated Package of Essential Services (IPES) which is offered at affiliate service delivery points. The IPES includes HIV testing, HIV prevention, HIV care and treatment, services for sexually transmitted infections and reproductive tract infections, contraception, abortion care, obstetrics and gynaecology, fertility support, and support for sexual and gender-based violence Purpose The purpose of our HIV Theory of Change is to clarify the goals and vision of IPPF’s HIV programme and to articulate the different pathways and strategies IPPF uses to contribute towards its HIV goals and vision. This Theory of Change endeavours to represent a conceptual model that is complex and non-linear in the format of a readable diagram. Therefore, this Theory of Change diagram is a simplified representation of a complex process which cannot be fully captured in this format. Our Theory of Change describes causal pathways for how the work in our HIV programme contributes to the ultimate goals and vision. The purpose of this conceptual model is not to provide a detailed description of the components of our HIV services, as these are described in the 2020 ‘IPPF Comprehensive HIV Services Package’ and the IPPF 2022 ‘Client-centred-clinical guidelines for sexual and reproductive health care’. Reading the diagram Our Theory of Change diagram is read from left to right, representing movement in time from the world we currently live in (left side) towards the future we would like to see, which is represented by our vision (right side). There are 7 pathways (page 1), each with a set of strategies (shown on pages 4 and 5 as close-ups of the diagram), whose work contributes towards achieving our HIV goals and vision. The 7 pathways are divided into cross-cutting pathways (community engagement, evidence and learning, capacity strengthening and sharing, strategic partnership building) and core pathways (advocacy, empowerment, comprehensive service delivery). The cross-cutting pathways are iterative and intersecting, contributing to each other and collectively contributing to the 3 core pathways. The core pathways represent the 3 main areas of our HIV programme, which, like all elements of the diagram, also interact with each other synergistically. The strategies of all 7 pathways working together contribute towards a set of outcomes. The outcomes interacting together contribute towards our goals, which in turn interact with each other, and contribute towards our ultimate vision.

website-banner
Resource

| 17 November 2023

Hostilities faced by people on the frontlines of SRHR: a scoping review

Frontline workers for sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) provide life-changing and life-saving services to millions of people every year. From accompanying the pregnant, delivering babies and caring for the newborn to supporting those subjected to sexual violence; from treating debilitating infections to expanding contraceptive choices; from enabling access to safe abortion services to countering homophobia: all over the world frontline SRHR carers and advocates make it possible for so many more to experience dignity in sex, sexuality and reproduction. Yet they are also subjected to hostility for what they do, for whom they provide care, for where they work and for the issues they address. From ostracistion and harassment in the workplace to verbal threats and physical violence, hostilities can extend even into their private lives. In other words, as SRHR workers seek to fulfil the human rights of others, their own human rights are put at risk. Yet, as grave as that is, it is a reality largely undocumented and thus also underestimated. This scoping review sets out to marshal what is known about how hostilities against frontline SRHR workers manifest, against whom, at whose hands and in which contexts. It is based on review of six sources: peer-reviewed and grey literature, news reports, sector surveys, and consultations with sector experts and, for contrast, literature issued by opposition groups. Each source contributes a partial picture only, yet taken together, they show that hostilities against frontline SRHR workers are committed the world over—in a range of countries, contexts and settings. Nevertheless, the narratives given in those sources more often treat hostilities as ‘one-off’, exceptional events and/or as an ‘inevitable’ part of daily work to be tolerated. That works in turn both to divorce such incidents from their wider historical, political and social contexts and to normalise the phenomena as if it is an expected part of a role and not a problem to be urgently addressed. Our findings confirm that the SRHR sector at large needs to step-up its response to such reprisals in ways more commensurate with their scale and gravity. Authors: Victoria Boydell, Kate Gilmore, Jameen Kaur, Jessica Morris, Rebecca Wilkins, Frieda Lurken, Sarah Shaw, Kate Austen, Molly Karp, Sally Pairman, Maria Antonieta Alcalde

website-banner
Resource

| 17 November 2023

Hostilities faced by people on the frontlines of SRHR: a scoping review

Frontline workers for sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) provide life-changing and life-saving services to millions of people every year. From accompanying the pregnant, delivering babies and caring for the newborn to supporting those subjected to sexual violence; from treating debilitating infections to expanding contraceptive choices; from enabling access to safe abortion services to countering homophobia: all over the world frontline SRHR carers and advocates make it possible for so many more to experience dignity in sex, sexuality and reproduction. Yet they are also subjected to hostility for what they do, for whom they provide care, for where they work and for the issues they address. From ostracistion and harassment in the workplace to verbal threats and physical violence, hostilities can extend even into their private lives. In other words, as SRHR workers seek to fulfil the human rights of others, their own human rights are put at risk. Yet, as grave as that is, it is a reality largely undocumented and thus also underestimated. This scoping review sets out to marshal what is known about how hostilities against frontline SRHR workers manifest, against whom, at whose hands and in which contexts. It is based on review of six sources: peer-reviewed and grey literature, news reports, sector surveys, and consultations with sector experts and, for contrast, literature issued by opposition groups. Each source contributes a partial picture only, yet taken together, they show that hostilities against frontline SRHR workers are committed the world over—in a range of countries, contexts and settings. Nevertheless, the narratives given in those sources more often treat hostilities as ‘one-off’, exceptional events and/or as an ‘inevitable’ part of daily work to be tolerated. That works in turn both to divorce such incidents from their wider historical, political and social contexts and to normalise the phenomena as if it is an expected part of a role and not a problem to be urgently addressed. Our findings confirm that the SRHR sector at large needs to step-up its response to such reprisals in ways more commensurate with their scale and gravity. Authors: Victoria Boydell, Kate Gilmore, Jameen Kaur, Jessica Morris, Rebecca Wilkins, Frieda Lurken, Sarah Shaw, Kate Austen, Molly Karp, Sally Pairman, Maria Antonieta Alcalde

palestine-CSE
Resource

| 10 October 2023

IMAP Statement on SRH services for very young adolescents

This IMAP Statement aims to present the sexual and reproductive health needs of very young adolescents, explain the barriers they face when accessing these services, and explore factors that can help facilitate pathways to rights-based services.  Download in English, French, Spanish and Arabic below.

palestine-CSE
Resource

| 10 October 2023

IMAP Statement on SRH services for very young adolescents

This IMAP Statement aims to present the sexual and reproductive health needs of very young adolescents, explain the barriers they face when accessing these services, and explore factors that can help facilitate pathways to rights-based services.  Download in English, French, Spanish and Arabic below.

Cover
Resource

| 25 September 2023

Dispensing emergency contraceptive pills according to the evidence and human rights: the role of pharmacists

In most countries in Europe (and in many other countries around the world) two forms of emergency contraceptive pills are accessible: both levonorgestrel and ulipristal acetate pills are available in pharmacies without a prescription. In this situation, pharmacy teams play an important role in facilitating access for women. Yet, significant variances in dispensing practices have been identified, leading to access disparities. This consensus statement aims to present the best evidence to support women’s right to choose which ECP to use, as well as pharmacists’ role in supporting their choice with accurate information and counseling. Download in English Below.

Cover
Resource

| 26 September 2023

Dispensing emergency contraceptive pills according to the evidence and human rights: the role of pharmacists

In most countries in Europe (and in many other countries around the world) two forms of emergency contraceptive pills are accessible: both levonorgestrel and ulipristal acetate pills are available in pharmacies without a prescription. In this situation, pharmacy teams play an important role in facilitating access for women. Yet, significant variances in dispensing practices have been identified, leading to access disparities. This consensus statement aims to present the best evidence to support women’s right to choose which ECP to use, as well as pharmacists’ role in supporting their choice with accurate information and counseling. Download in English Below.

blue background
Resource

| 22 May 2024

IMAP Statement on Person-centred Care for Sexually Transmitted Infections

Recognizing the significant global impact of sexually transmitted infections (STIs), this statement affirms IPPF’s commitment to people-centred STI care as a critical aspect of comprehensive sexual and reproductive health and well-being. A holistic approach to sexual and reproductive health and rights acknowledges that true sexual and reproductive well-being extends beyond the prevention and treatment of diseases. It emphasizes the importance of promoting healthy, satisfying sexual and reproductive experiences. This includes advocating for personcentred care, encouraging self-care strategies, and supporting the development of innovative healthcare delivery models tailored to meet the diverse needs of individuals in various circumstances and contexts, particularly reaching those who are often excluded and marginalized. This statement updates the latest information on STIs. It provides practical recommendations for IPPF Member Associations on how to develop a comprehensive, people-centred approach to STI care, emphasizing integrated services, adherence to guidelines, rights-based care, community engagement, advocacy, and a positive perspective on sexual health and well-being.

blue background
Resource

| 22 May 2024

IMAP Statement on Person-centred Care for Sexually Transmitted Infections

Recognizing the significant global impact of sexually transmitted infections (STIs), this statement affirms IPPF’s commitment to people-centred STI care as a critical aspect of comprehensive sexual and reproductive health and well-being. A holistic approach to sexual and reproductive health and rights acknowledges that true sexual and reproductive well-being extends beyond the prevention and treatment of diseases. It emphasizes the importance of promoting healthy, satisfying sexual and reproductive experiences. This includes advocating for personcentred care, encouraging self-care strategies, and supporting the development of innovative healthcare delivery models tailored to meet the diverse needs of individuals in various circumstances and contexts, particularly reaching those who are often excluded and marginalized. This statement updates the latest information on STIs. It provides practical recommendations for IPPF Member Associations on how to develop a comprehensive, people-centred approach to STI care, emphasizing integrated services, adherence to guidelines, rights-based care, community engagement, advocacy, and a positive perspective on sexual health and well-being.

IPPF Humanitarian Sudan
Resource

| 01 February 2024

U.S. 990 2022

IPPF Humanitarian Sudan
Resource

| 01 February 2024

U.S. 990 2022

HIV
Resource

| 20 November 2023

HIV Theory of Change

Background IPPF offers a comprehensive approach to sexual and reproductive health and rights through its Integrated Package of Essential Services (IPES) which is offered at affiliate service delivery points. The IPES includes HIV testing, HIV prevention, HIV care and treatment, services for sexually transmitted infections and reproductive tract infections, contraception, abortion care, obstetrics and gynaecology, fertility support, and support for sexual and gender-based violence Purpose The purpose of our HIV Theory of Change is to clarify the goals and vision of IPPF’s HIV programme and to articulate the different pathways and strategies IPPF uses to contribute towards its HIV goals and vision. This Theory of Change endeavours to represent a conceptual model that is complex and non-linear in the format of a readable diagram. Therefore, this Theory of Change diagram is a simplified representation of a complex process which cannot be fully captured in this format. Our Theory of Change describes causal pathways for how the work in our HIV programme contributes to the ultimate goals and vision. The purpose of this conceptual model is not to provide a detailed description of the components of our HIV services, as these are described in the 2020 ‘IPPF Comprehensive HIV Services Package’ and the IPPF 2022 ‘Client-centred-clinical guidelines for sexual and reproductive health care’. Reading the diagram Our Theory of Change diagram is read from left to right, representing movement in time from the world we currently live in (left side) towards the future we would like to see, which is represented by our vision (right side). There are 7 pathways (page 1), each with a set of strategies (shown on pages 4 and 5 as close-ups of the diagram), whose work contributes towards achieving our HIV goals and vision. The 7 pathways are divided into cross-cutting pathways (community engagement, evidence and learning, capacity strengthening and sharing, strategic partnership building) and core pathways (advocacy, empowerment, comprehensive service delivery). The cross-cutting pathways are iterative and intersecting, contributing to each other and collectively contributing to the 3 core pathways. The core pathways represent the 3 main areas of our HIV programme, which, like all elements of the diagram, also interact with each other synergistically. The strategies of all 7 pathways working together contribute towards a set of outcomes. The outcomes interacting together contribute towards our goals, which in turn interact with each other, and contribute towards our ultimate vision.

HIV
Resource

| 20 November 2023

HIV Theory of Change

Background IPPF offers a comprehensive approach to sexual and reproductive health and rights through its Integrated Package of Essential Services (IPES) which is offered at affiliate service delivery points. The IPES includes HIV testing, HIV prevention, HIV care and treatment, services for sexually transmitted infections and reproductive tract infections, contraception, abortion care, obstetrics and gynaecology, fertility support, and support for sexual and gender-based violence Purpose The purpose of our HIV Theory of Change is to clarify the goals and vision of IPPF’s HIV programme and to articulate the different pathways and strategies IPPF uses to contribute towards its HIV goals and vision. This Theory of Change endeavours to represent a conceptual model that is complex and non-linear in the format of a readable diagram. Therefore, this Theory of Change diagram is a simplified representation of a complex process which cannot be fully captured in this format. Our Theory of Change describes causal pathways for how the work in our HIV programme contributes to the ultimate goals and vision. The purpose of this conceptual model is not to provide a detailed description of the components of our HIV services, as these are described in the 2020 ‘IPPF Comprehensive HIV Services Package’ and the IPPF 2022 ‘Client-centred-clinical guidelines for sexual and reproductive health care’. Reading the diagram Our Theory of Change diagram is read from left to right, representing movement in time from the world we currently live in (left side) towards the future we would like to see, which is represented by our vision (right side). There are 7 pathways (page 1), each with a set of strategies (shown on pages 4 and 5 as close-ups of the diagram), whose work contributes towards achieving our HIV goals and vision. The 7 pathways are divided into cross-cutting pathways (community engagement, evidence and learning, capacity strengthening and sharing, strategic partnership building) and core pathways (advocacy, empowerment, comprehensive service delivery). The cross-cutting pathways are iterative and intersecting, contributing to each other and collectively contributing to the 3 core pathways. The core pathways represent the 3 main areas of our HIV programme, which, like all elements of the diagram, also interact with each other synergistically. The strategies of all 7 pathways working together contribute towards a set of outcomes. The outcomes interacting together contribute towards our goals, which in turn interact with each other, and contribute towards our ultimate vision.

website-banner
Resource

| 17 November 2023

Hostilities faced by people on the frontlines of SRHR: a scoping review

Frontline workers for sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) provide life-changing and life-saving services to millions of people every year. From accompanying the pregnant, delivering babies and caring for the newborn to supporting those subjected to sexual violence; from treating debilitating infections to expanding contraceptive choices; from enabling access to safe abortion services to countering homophobia: all over the world frontline SRHR carers and advocates make it possible for so many more to experience dignity in sex, sexuality and reproduction. Yet they are also subjected to hostility for what they do, for whom they provide care, for where they work and for the issues they address. From ostracistion and harassment in the workplace to verbal threats and physical violence, hostilities can extend even into their private lives. In other words, as SRHR workers seek to fulfil the human rights of others, their own human rights are put at risk. Yet, as grave as that is, it is a reality largely undocumented and thus also underestimated. This scoping review sets out to marshal what is known about how hostilities against frontline SRHR workers manifest, against whom, at whose hands and in which contexts. It is based on review of six sources: peer-reviewed and grey literature, news reports, sector surveys, and consultations with sector experts and, for contrast, literature issued by opposition groups. Each source contributes a partial picture only, yet taken together, they show that hostilities against frontline SRHR workers are committed the world over—in a range of countries, contexts and settings. Nevertheless, the narratives given in those sources more often treat hostilities as ‘one-off’, exceptional events and/or as an ‘inevitable’ part of daily work to be tolerated. That works in turn both to divorce such incidents from their wider historical, political and social contexts and to normalise the phenomena as if it is an expected part of a role and not a problem to be urgently addressed. Our findings confirm that the SRHR sector at large needs to step-up its response to such reprisals in ways more commensurate with their scale and gravity. Authors: Victoria Boydell, Kate Gilmore, Jameen Kaur, Jessica Morris, Rebecca Wilkins, Frieda Lurken, Sarah Shaw, Kate Austen, Molly Karp, Sally Pairman, Maria Antonieta Alcalde

website-banner
Resource

| 17 November 2023

Hostilities faced by people on the frontlines of SRHR: a scoping review

Frontline workers for sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR) provide life-changing and life-saving services to millions of people every year. From accompanying the pregnant, delivering babies and caring for the newborn to supporting those subjected to sexual violence; from treating debilitating infections to expanding contraceptive choices; from enabling access to safe abortion services to countering homophobia: all over the world frontline SRHR carers and advocates make it possible for so many more to experience dignity in sex, sexuality and reproduction. Yet they are also subjected to hostility for what they do, for whom they provide care, for where they work and for the issues they address. From ostracistion and harassment in the workplace to verbal threats and physical violence, hostilities can extend even into their private lives. In other words, as SRHR workers seek to fulfil the human rights of others, their own human rights are put at risk. Yet, as grave as that is, it is a reality largely undocumented and thus also underestimated. This scoping review sets out to marshal what is known about how hostilities against frontline SRHR workers manifest, against whom, at whose hands and in which contexts. It is based on review of six sources: peer-reviewed and grey literature, news reports, sector surveys, and consultations with sector experts and, for contrast, literature issued by opposition groups. Each source contributes a partial picture only, yet taken together, they show that hostilities against frontline SRHR workers are committed the world over—in a range of countries, contexts and settings. Nevertheless, the narratives given in those sources more often treat hostilities as ‘one-off’, exceptional events and/or as an ‘inevitable’ part of daily work to be tolerated. That works in turn both to divorce such incidents from their wider historical, political and social contexts and to normalise the phenomena as if it is an expected part of a role and not a problem to be urgently addressed. Our findings confirm that the SRHR sector at large needs to step-up its response to such reprisals in ways more commensurate with their scale and gravity. Authors: Victoria Boydell, Kate Gilmore, Jameen Kaur, Jessica Morris, Rebecca Wilkins, Frieda Lurken, Sarah Shaw, Kate Austen, Molly Karp, Sally Pairman, Maria Antonieta Alcalde

palestine-CSE
Resource

| 10 October 2023

IMAP Statement on SRH services for very young adolescents

This IMAP Statement aims to present the sexual and reproductive health needs of very young adolescents, explain the barriers they face when accessing these services, and explore factors that can help facilitate pathways to rights-based services.  Download in English, French, Spanish and Arabic below.

palestine-CSE
Resource

| 10 October 2023

IMAP Statement on SRH services for very young adolescents

This IMAP Statement aims to present the sexual and reproductive health needs of very young adolescents, explain the barriers they face when accessing these services, and explore factors that can help facilitate pathways to rights-based services.  Download in English, French, Spanish and Arabic below.

Cover
Resource

| 25 September 2023

Dispensing emergency contraceptive pills according to the evidence and human rights: the role of pharmacists

In most countries in Europe (and in many other countries around the world) two forms of emergency contraceptive pills are accessible: both levonorgestrel and ulipristal acetate pills are available in pharmacies without a prescription. In this situation, pharmacy teams play an important role in facilitating access for women. Yet, significant variances in dispensing practices have been identified, leading to access disparities. This consensus statement aims to present the best evidence to support women’s right to choose which ECP to use, as well as pharmacists’ role in supporting their choice with accurate information and counseling. Download in English Below.

Cover
Resource

| 26 September 2023

Dispensing emergency contraceptive pills according to the evidence and human rights: the role of pharmacists

In most countries in Europe (and in many other countries around the world) two forms of emergency contraceptive pills are accessible: both levonorgestrel and ulipristal acetate pills are available in pharmacies without a prescription. In this situation, pharmacy teams play an important role in facilitating access for women. Yet, significant variances in dispensing practices have been identified, leading to access disparities. This consensus statement aims to present the best evidence to support women’s right to choose which ECP to use, as well as pharmacists’ role in supporting their choice with accurate information and counseling. Download in English Below.