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Latest news from IPPF

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A selection of news from across the Federation

UN
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Civil Society Welcomes CPD Political Declaration

International Sexual and Reproductive Rights Coalition (ISRRC) statement on the adoption of the Political declaration by the Commission on Population and Development.

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Durex and IPPF logos
news item

| 05 August 2016

IPPF and Durex join forces to raise awareness of Zika as an STI

Global #DontShareZika campaign launched to spread the message with an educational video and condom giveaway.  As the global focus shifts to Brazil, the world’s leading sexual wellbeing brand Durex and the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) have joined forces to launch #DontShareZika, a global campaign to raise awareness of the Zika virus, educate about its status as a sexually transmitted infection (STI) and provide direct support by handing out millions of free condoms. We're working with @ippf to help stop the spread of #Zika. Want to help? Share this, but #DontShareZika… pic.twitter.com/hdhx51sEi2 — Durex Global (@durex) August 5, 2016 The move follows the update by the World Health Organization (WHO), confirming that in addition to being spread by infected mosquitoes, Zika* can also be transmitted sexually. This means that everyone - including people in a monogamous relationship - may be at risk from the STI if they, or their partner, have visited an affected area and been bitten by an infected mosquito. As an STI, the Zika virus has the potential to travel and spread between people who may not even realise they are infected. In response, Durex have created the #DontShareZika video to educate that the Zika virus can be passed between couples during unprotected sex, and committed to a giveaway of three million free condoms in Brazil. WHO recommends that men and women returning from an area where Zika is circulating should practice safer sex, including through the correct and consistent use of condoms, for at least eight weeks after leaving an affected area, even if they don’t have symptoms. At a time when Brazil is expecting as many as a million extra visitors from across the globe, the #DontShareZika campaign aims to spread this important message as widely as possible to limit the risk of further infections. #DontShareZika follows recent work by Durex lobbying for the world’s first safe sex emoji** designed to help young people discuss safe sex. Both initiatives are part of Durex’s continuous efforts for better sexual health and education globally. “As the world’s number one sexual wellbeing brand we have a responsibility to make people aware of this STI, to help people to stay healthy and to prevent the sexual transmission of the virus.” commented the Global Director ofRB the brand, Volker Sydow. IPPF Director General Tewodros Melesse, added; “Our aim is to ensure all people have access to sexual and reproductive health information and services. At the moment, many people still don’t realise that Zika can be transmitted sexually. Communicating this and enabling people to protect themselves and their partners is critical, so we welcome #DontShareZika and Durex’s free condom giveaway in Brazil.” Durex are calling for people to support the campaign and help share a message of protection and prevention faster than this STI, Zika, can be spread, by sharing the informative video and using the hashtag #DontShareZika. Follow @Durex for more information. For more information on the Zika virus visit: http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/zika/en/. -ENDS- For further information please contact Amy Williams: [email protected]/ 0207 292 5084 or Toby Leston: [email protected]/ 0207 2929 6451 Notes to Editors * Zika virus is linked to microcephaly - a condition where babies are born with brain damage and undeveloped heads. ** www.youtube.com/watch?v=O7iKgKpkWfU About Durex Durex® is the #1 sexual wellbeing brand worldwide. The brand not only produces condoms that exceeds global testing standards, but also offers pleasure gels, lubricants and personal massagers. With over 80 years of experience in the bedroom, Durex is dedicated to inspiring lovers to love sex safely. That is why Durex will never stop innovating with new products that enhance the sexual experience, helping couples get closer and go further together. For more information, go to www.Durex.com. About RB* RB is the world’s leading consumer health and hygiene company. The company has operations in over 60 countries, with headquarters in London, Dubai and Amsterdam, and sales in most countries across the globe. The company employs approximately c. 37,000 people worldwide. Inspired by a purpose to deliver innovative solutions for healthier lives and happier homes, RB is in the top 20 companies listed on the London Stock Exchange. We are the global No 1or No 2 in the majority of our fast-growing categories, driven by an exceptional focus on innovation. Our health, hygiene and home portfolio is led by our global Powerbrands including Nurofen, Strepsils Gaviscon, Mucinex, Durex, Scholl, Clearasil, Lysol, Dettol, Veet, Harpic, Cillit Bang, Mortein, Finish, Vanish, Calgon, Air Wick, Woolite and French’s. Our Powerbrands represent 80% of net revenue. RB is redefining the world of consumer health and hygiene. Our people and unique culture are at the heart of our success. We have a drive for achievement and a passion to outperform wherever we focus, including sustainability where we are targeting a 1/3 reduction in water impact, 1/3 reduction in carbon and 1/3 of net revenue from more sustainable products. We are proud to be Save the Children’s largest global partner, with a new vision to radically reduce one the world’s largest killer of under 5s, diarrhea. For more information visit www.rb.com. *RB is the trading name of Reckitt Benckiser group of companies About IPPF IPPF delivers sexual and reproductive health services that let people make their own choices. We fight for everyone to have the right to make those choices. We are local, through our members and volunteers, and global, through our network. We meet need, wherever it is, whoever requires it, for as long as they want it.

Durex and IPPF logos
news_item

| 05 August 2016

IPPF and Durex join forces to raise awareness of Zika as an STI

Global #DontShareZika campaign launched to spread the message with an educational video and condom giveaway.  As the global focus shifts to Brazil, the world’s leading sexual wellbeing brand Durex and the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) have joined forces to launch #DontShareZika, a global campaign to raise awareness of the Zika virus, educate about its status as a sexually transmitted infection (STI) and provide direct support by handing out millions of free condoms. We're working with @ippf to help stop the spread of #Zika. Want to help? Share this, but #DontShareZika… pic.twitter.com/hdhx51sEi2 — Durex Global (@durex) August 5, 2016 The move follows the update by the World Health Organization (WHO), confirming that in addition to being spread by infected mosquitoes, Zika* can also be transmitted sexually. This means that everyone - including people in a monogamous relationship - may be at risk from the STI if they, or their partner, have visited an affected area and been bitten by an infected mosquito. As an STI, the Zika virus has the potential to travel and spread between people who may not even realise they are infected. In response, Durex have created the #DontShareZika video to educate that the Zika virus can be passed between couples during unprotected sex, and committed to a giveaway of three million free condoms in Brazil. WHO recommends that men and women returning from an area where Zika is circulating should practice safer sex, including through the correct and consistent use of condoms, for at least eight weeks after leaving an affected area, even if they don’t have symptoms. At a time when Brazil is expecting as many as a million extra visitors from across the globe, the #DontShareZika campaign aims to spread this important message as widely as possible to limit the risk of further infections. #DontShareZika follows recent work by Durex lobbying for the world’s first safe sex emoji** designed to help young people discuss safe sex. Both initiatives are part of Durex’s continuous efforts for better sexual health and education globally. “As the world’s number one sexual wellbeing brand we have a responsibility to make people aware of this STI, to help people to stay healthy and to prevent the sexual transmission of the virus.” commented the Global Director ofRB the brand, Volker Sydow. IPPF Director General Tewodros Melesse, added; “Our aim is to ensure all people have access to sexual and reproductive health information and services. At the moment, many people still don’t realise that Zika can be transmitted sexually. Communicating this and enabling people to protect themselves and their partners is critical, so we welcome #DontShareZika and Durex’s free condom giveaway in Brazil.” Durex are calling for people to support the campaign and help share a message of protection and prevention faster than this STI, Zika, can be spread, by sharing the informative video and using the hashtag #DontShareZika. Follow @Durex for more information. For more information on the Zika virus visit: http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/zika/en/. -ENDS- For further information please contact Amy Williams: [email protected]/ 0207 292 5084 or Toby Leston: [email protected]/ 0207 2929 6451 Notes to Editors * Zika virus is linked to microcephaly - a condition where babies are born with brain damage and undeveloped heads. ** www.youtube.com/watch?v=O7iKgKpkWfU About Durex Durex® is the #1 sexual wellbeing brand worldwide. The brand not only produces condoms that exceeds global testing standards, but also offers pleasure gels, lubricants and personal massagers. With over 80 years of experience in the bedroom, Durex is dedicated to inspiring lovers to love sex safely. That is why Durex will never stop innovating with new products that enhance the sexual experience, helping couples get closer and go further together. For more information, go to www.Durex.com. About RB* RB is the world’s leading consumer health and hygiene company. The company has operations in over 60 countries, with headquarters in London, Dubai and Amsterdam, and sales in most countries across the globe. The company employs approximately c. 37,000 people worldwide. Inspired by a purpose to deliver innovative solutions for healthier lives and happier homes, RB is in the top 20 companies listed on the London Stock Exchange. We are the global No 1or No 2 in the majority of our fast-growing categories, driven by an exceptional focus on innovation. Our health, hygiene and home portfolio is led by our global Powerbrands including Nurofen, Strepsils Gaviscon, Mucinex, Durex, Scholl, Clearasil, Lysol, Dettol, Veet, Harpic, Cillit Bang, Mortein, Finish, Vanish, Calgon, Air Wick, Woolite and French’s. Our Powerbrands represent 80% of net revenue. RB is redefining the world of consumer health and hygiene. Our people and unique culture are at the heart of our success. We have a drive for achievement and a passion to outperform wherever we focus, including sustainability where we are targeting a 1/3 reduction in water impact, 1/3 reduction in carbon and 1/3 of net revenue from more sustainable products. We are proud to be Save the Children’s largest global partner, with a new vision to radically reduce one the world’s largest killer of under 5s, diarrhea. For more information visit www.rb.com. *RB is the trading name of Reckitt Benckiser group of companies About IPPF IPPF delivers sexual and reproductive health services that let people make their own choices. We fight for everyone to have the right to make those choices. We are local, through our members and volunteers, and global, through our network. We meet need, wherever it is, whoever requires it, for as long as they want it.

FPOP and IPPF-SPRINT staff working with displaced people in the Philippines
news item

| 02 August 2016

IPPF-SPRINT provides humanitarian assistance in conflict affected areas of North Cotabato, Philippines

Aug 2, 2016: New Delhi: Manila: The International Planned Parenthood Federation through its humanitarian wing, the SPRINT Initiative, is providing humanitarian assistance in the conflict-affected areas of Cotabato in the Philippines. The armed conflict between the Government of the Philippines (GPH) and the secessionist Moro Islamic Liberation Front (MILF) has lasted for more than five decades and has displaced around a million people in central Mindanao, Philippines. According to reports dated April 2016, the armed conflict has escalated, creating concerns over a protracted crisis and the vulnerability of women and girls. The conflict has internally displaced farmers who are living in the hinterland communities of the province of North Cotabato, namely in the municipalities of Makilala, Magpet, Kabacan and Tulunan. The SPRINT Initiative project will reach out to 25 affected villages or barangays located in geographically isolated and depressed areas, thereby making access to healthcare an extremely rare thing. As per the assessments done by IPPF’s East and South East Asia and Oceania Region office’s (ESEAOR) Member Association, the Family Planning Association of Philippines (FPOP), access to Sexual and Reproductive Health (SRH) services in these villages is very limited. “IPPF-SPRINT and FPOP will coordinate the implementation of this project with (the) UNFPA centre in Mindanao throughout the 4-month period from August to November, 2016. The Minimum Initial Service Package (MISP) will be implemented on-the-ground. IPPF-SPRINT will reach out to around 15,000 beneficiaries in the area and will provide crucial and life-saving SRH services. An amount of AUD 50,000 has been mobilised for the response,” said Aditi Ghosh, Director, IPPF-SPRINT. This humanitarian response is being funded by the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT) under the Australian government. “FPOP is a part of the UN cluster system, particularly Health and Protection clusters in the national level. FPOP will also coordinate the humanitarian response with UN regional centres covering affected areas. The North Cotabato Provincial Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council (DRRMC) will also play a key role in implementing the MISP,” said Nora Murat, Regional Director, IPPF-ESEAOR. IPPF-SPRINT will work on prevention and management of the consequences of sexual violence, reduction of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) including HIV transmission, prevention of excess maternal and neonatal mortality and morbidity, plan for the provision of comprehensive SRH services and integrate into primary health care as the situation permits.   Apart from the above, orientation on MISP and Risk Management for implementing partners and project staff/volunteers will be undertaken.     Contact info: Murali Kunduru: [email protected] Jayamalar Samuel: [email protected] Media Contact: Rhea Chawla: [email protected] www.ippf-sprint.org   The SPRINT Initiative is a Sexual and Reproductive Health (SRH) Programme in Crisis and Post-Crisis Situations. SPRINT ensures access to essential lifesaving SRH services for women, men and children in times of crises, a time when services are most needed yet are not prioritised or recognised by key humanitarian responders.   The SPRINT Initiative saves lives and delivers on behalf of the Australian Government aid program (DFAT: Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade), which aims to provide more effective preparedness for and response to disasters and crises.   The Initiative is managed by the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) and represents its commitment to increasing access to SRH services for crisis-affected populations. The International Planned Parenthood Federation is a global service provider and a leading advocate of sexual and reproductive health and rights for all. It is a worldwide movement of national organisations working with and for communities and individuals.  

FPOP and IPPF-SPRINT staff working with displaced people in the Philippines
news_item

| 02 August 2016

IPPF-SPRINT provides humanitarian assistance in conflict affected areas of North Cotabato, Philippines

Aug 2, 2016: New Delhi: Manila: The International Planned Parenthood Federation through its humanitarian wing, the SPRINT Initiative, is providing humanitarian assistance in the conflict-affected areas of Cotabato in the Philippines. The armed conflict between the Government of the Philippines (GPH) and the secessionist Moro Islamic Liberation Front (MILF) has lasted for more than five decades and has displaced around a million people in central Mindanao, Philippines. According to reports dated April 2016, the armed conflict has escalated, creating concerns over a protracted crisis and the vulnerability of women and girls. The conflict has internally displaced farmers who are living in the hinterland communities of the province of North Cotabato, namely in the municipalities of Makilala, Magpet, Kabacan and Tulunan. The SPRINT Initiative project will reach out to 25 affected villages or barangays located in geographically isolated and depressed areas, thereby making access to healthcare an extremely rare thing. As per the assessments done by IPPF’s East and South East Asia and Oceania Region office’s (ESEAOR) Member Association, the Family Planning Association of Philippines (FPOP), access to Sexual and Reproductive Health (SRH) services in these villages is very limited. “IPPF-SPRINT and FPOP will coordinate the implementation of this project with (the) UNFPA centre in Mindanao throughout the 4-month period from August to November, 2016. The Minimum Initial Service Package (MISP) will be implemented on-the-ground. IPPF-SPRINT will reach out to around 15,000 beneficiaries in the area and will provide crucial and life-saving SRH services. An amount of AUD 50,000 has been mobilised for the response,” said Aditi Ghosh, Director, IPPF-SPRINT. This humanitarian response is being funded by the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT) under the Australian government. “FPOP is a part of the UN cluster system, particularly Health and Protection clusters in the national level. FPOP will also coordinate the humanitarian response with UN regional centres covering affected areas. The North Cotabato Provincial Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council (DRRMC) will also play a key role in implementing the MISP,” said Nora Murat, Regional Director, IPPF-ESEAOR. IPPF-SPRINT will work on prevention and management of the consequences of sexual violence, reduction of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) including HIV transmission, prevention of excess maternal and neonatal mortality and morbidity, plan for the provision of comprehensive SRH services and integrate into primary health care as the situation permits.   Apart from the above, orientation on MISP and Risk Management for implementing partners and project staff/volunteers will be undertaken.     Contact info: Murali Kunduru: [email protected] Jayamalar Samuel: [email protected] Media Contact: Rhea Chawla: [email protected] www.ippf-sprint.org   The SPRINT Initiative is a Sexual and Reproductive Health (SRH) Programme in Crisis and Post-Crisis Situations. SPRINT ensures access to essential lifesaving SRH services for women, men and children in times of crises, a time when services are most needed yet are not prioritised or recognised by key humanitarian responders.   The SPRINT Initiative saves lives and delivers on behalf of the Australian Government aid program (DFAT: Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade), which aims to provide more effective preparedness for and response to disasters and crises.   The Initiative is managed by the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) and represents its commitment to increasing access to SRH services for crisis-affected populations. The International Planned Parenthood Federation is a global service provider and a leading advocate of sexual and reproductive health and rights for all. It is a worldwide movement of national organisations working with and for communities and individuals.  

Four black women, looking at the camera. Gambia, ph:Chloe Hall
news item

| 20 July 2016

End gender based violence and HIV to ensure equity

18 July, Durban: Gender Based Violence (GBV) must be recognised and addressed if we are to end HIV and AIDS urged the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) and the United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women (UN Women) at a panel during the International AIDS Conference Monday. The impact of HIV among women and girls in all their diversity is significant and alarming. Women’s greater physical vulnerability to HIV is compounded by social norms, gender inequalities, poverty and violence. Women living with HIV are also more likely to face stigmatisation, infertility, and even abuse and abandonment, contributing to their disempowerment. In East and Southern Africa, the risk of HIV among women who have experienced violence maybe three times higher In Uganda and South Africa studies found women who experienced intimate partner violence were 50 per cent more likely to have HIV than women who had not experienced violence. In many countries in Africa, getting married is among the ‘riskiest’ behaviour for women, where they may be exposed to unprotected sex with a husband who has multiple sexual partners, and to underlying power dynamics between men and women that prevent women from accessing condoms and then insisting on their use. Julia Omondi, a 24 year old advocate from Family Health Options Kenya (FHOK) highlighted the most common root causes of gender based violence and HIV, ‘I work with a group of 50 young girls like myself, called the 3E advocates to prevent girls from child marriage; support girls who are living with HIV to understand their rights, make parents and communities aware of the laws that protect girls from child marriage. We need to raise our voices to stop child marriage and turn the tide against HIV’. “Empowerment + Engagement = Equality” is a joint project supported by UN Women and IPPF implemented in Kenya, Malawi and Uganda to address HIV vulnerability among adolescent girls and young women by engaging and empowering them. Traditional leaders like the senior chief Theresa Kachindamoto from Malawi spoke of her role to change harmful gender related practices, she said, ‘Chiefs as custodians of culture should be  at the forefront to end cultural practices that negatively affect people’s health like sexual cleansing (Fisi), chief blanket. My village is now a model for others and my fellow chiefs come to learn about the change I have brought to Dedtza district in Malawi.’      Nazneen Damji, Policy Advisor- gender equality, health and HIV/AIDS at UN Women, highlighted the recognition by global leaders on the importance of addressing GBV and HIV. “Violence, and the fear of violence, can play a major role in women’s reluctance to know her HIV status and seek care.  Fortunately, the Political Declaration on HIV/AIDS adopted in June at the UN General Assembly and the Resolution on women, the girl child and HIV adopted at the 60th Session of the Commission on the Status of Women both call on governments to intensify efforts to end all forms of violence against women and girls, including harmful practices that contribute to the spread of HIV amongst women and girls” ‘Civil society organisations like IPPF play an important part in holding governments accountable.  We shouldn’t underestimate our role as advocates to inform national, regional and global policies. If we are to address the dual epidemics of GBV and HIV we need to have progressive polices where perpetrators can be brought to justice and laws and policies uphold gender equality’  said  Zelda Nhlabatsi, the executive director of Family Life Association of Swaziland (FLAS). The session was sponsored  by IPPF Africa Region, UN Women and the Ford Foundation.    

Four black women, looking at the camera. Gambia, ph:Chloe Hall
news_item

| 20 July 2016

End gender based violence and HIV to ensure equity

18 July, Durban: Gender Based Violence (GBV) must be recognised and addressed if we are to end HIV and AIDS urged the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) and the United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women (UN Women) at a panel during the International AIDS Conference Monday. The impact of HIV among women and girls in all their diversity is significant and alarming. Women’s greater physical vulnerability to HIV is compounded by social norms, gender inequalities, poverty and violence. Women living with HIV are also more likely to face stigmatisation, infertility, and even abuse and abandonment, contributing to their disempowerment. In East and Southern Africa, the risk of HIV among women who have experienced violence maybe three times higher In Uganda and South Africa studies found women who experienced intimate partner violence were 50 per cent more likely to have HIV than women who had not experienced violence. In many countries in Africa, getting married is among the ‘riskiest’ behaviour for women, where they may be exposed to unprotected sex with a husband who has multiple sexual partners, and to underlying power dynamics between men and women that prevent women from accessing condoms and then insisting on their use. Julia Omondi, a 24 year old advocate from Family Health Options Kenya (FHOK) highlighted the most common root causes of gender based violence and HIV, ‘I work with a group of 50 young girls like myself, called the 3E advocates to prevent girls from child marriage; support girls who are living with HIV to understand their rights, make parents and communities aware of the laws that protect girls from child marriage. We need to raise our voices to stop child marriage and turn the tide against HIV’. “Empowerment + Engagement = Equality” is a joint project supported by UN Women and IPPF implemented in Kenya, Malawi and Uganda to address HIV vulnerability among adolescent girls and young women by engaging and empowering them. Traditional leaders like the senior chief Theresa Kachindamoto from Malawi spoke of her role to change harmful gender related practices, she said, ‘Chiefs as custodians of culture should be  at the forefront to end cultural practices that negatively affect people’s health like sexual cleansing (Fisi), chief blanket. My village is now a model for others and my fellow chiefs come to learn about the change I have brought to Dedtza district in Malawi.’      Nazneen Damji, Policy Advisor- gender equality, health and HIV/AIDS at UN Women, highlighted the recognition by global leaders on the importance of addressing GBV and HIV. “Violence, and the fear of violence, can play a major role in women’s reluctance to know her HIV status and seek care.  Fortunately, the Political Declaration on HIV/AIDS adopted in June at the UN General Assembly and the Resolution on women, the girl child and HIV adopted at the 60th Session of the Commission on the Status of Women both call on governments to intensify efforts to end all forms of violence against women and girls, including harmful practices that contribute to the spread of HIV amongst women and girls” ‘Civil society organisations like IPPF play an important part in holding governments accountable.  We shouldn’t underestimate our role as advocates to inform national, regional and global policies. If we are to address the dual epidemics of GBV and HIV we need to have progressive polices where perpetrators can be brought to justice and laws and policies uphold gender equality’  said  Zelda Nhlabatsi, the executive director of Family Life Association of Swaziland (FLAS). The session was sponsored  by IPPF Africa Region, UN Women and the Ford Foundation.    

Young people wearing the #KnowItOwnIt T-shirts
news item

| 23 May 2016

Global comprehensive sexuality education: “too little, too late, too biological” says new report

Sex education across the world is ‘too little, too late and too biological’, according to a new report released today by the world’s leading provider of sexual health services. The International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF), which works with partner organisations in 170 countries, is calling for all of the world’s 1.8 billion young people aged between 10 and 24 to get universal access to comprehensive sexuality education (CSE). A new report called: ‘Everyone’s Right to Know: delivering comprehensive sexuality education for all young people’ calls for more investment in, and better CSE for the largest youth population that the world has ever seen. IPPF says it is an issue that needs to be tackled urgently as the number of young people continues to rise. “The starting point, and the absolute minimum requirement, is that CSE must reach all young people – wherever they are,” according to the Director General of IPPF, Tewodros Melesse. “We cannot achieve gender transformative change by focusing only on health outcomes. We must equip young people with information about health as well as positive aspects of sex and sexuality,” he added. The report argues that millions of young people are missing out completely on CSE. It says that CSE delivery is often outdated and non-participatory and that teaching staff are not adequately trained and content focuses exclusively on health outcomes, rather than the recognition of rights. Too often CSE is scientifically inaccurate and solely geared to health outcomes. In particular, it emphasizes potential negative health risks, as opposed to seeing young people as sexual beings and recognizing the positive aspects of sexuality. The report also says that the most vulnerable young people, who often find themselves outside the school system, are excluded. IPPF believes gaps must be filled to ensure that CSE is also provided in non-formal settings outside the classroom, reaching the hardest to reach young people. Vesna Turmakovska works with young people with learning difficulties at IPPF’s Member Association in Macedonia. She said: “Sexuality is part of these young people’s lives; they’re sexual beings and they express their sexuality on a daily basis. Some parents were afraid that the very fact of learning about sexuality would encourage their children to have sexual relations. “We explained that it was about giving skills to their children to make them capable of defending themselves from potential abusers. We also explained that they need skills to become more independent in life, and need to be able to make a distinction between friendship and love.” The report demands three things. It calls on government worldwide to deliver high quality CSE that meets the needs of all young people in and out of schools. Secondly, governments, civil society organizations and health providers must make sure teachers, educational institutions and individuals who deliver CSE in both schools and non-formal settings are trained sufficiently and are confident in delivering sexuality education in a way that is positive and non-judgmental. Finally, educators and civil society should work with communities and parents to build support for CSE as well as a culture that supports choice and respect for young people and their sexual and reproductive health and rights. This report says implementing high quality CSE inside and outside schools is a necessity for governments worldwide, not a political choice. It says that to ignore the education of young people, to restrict their choices, to limit access to life-saving services and to deny their happiness   Notes to editors: For more information please contact a member of IPPF’s communications team. Marek Pruszewicz, Director of Communications [email protected]+44(0) 7740 631769   

Young people wearing the #KnowItOwnIt T-shirts
news_item

| 17 May 2016

Global comprehensive sexuality education: “too little, too late, too biological” says new report

Sex education across the world is ‘too little, too late and too biological’, according to a new report released today by the world’s leading provider of sexual health services. The International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF), which works with partner organisations in 170 countries, is calling for all of the world’s 1.8 billion young people aged between 10 and 24 to get universal access to comprehensive sexuality education (CSE). A new report called: ‘Everyone’s Right to Know: delivering comprehensive sexuality education for all young people’ calls for more investment in, and better CSE for the largest youth population that the world has ever seen. IPPF says it is an issue that needs to be tackled urgently as the number of young people continues to rise. “The starting point, and the absolute minimum requirement, is that CSE must reach all young people – wherever they are,” according to the Director General of IPPF, Tewodros Melesse. “We cannot achieve gender transformative change by focusing only on health outcomes. We must equip young people with information about health as well as positive aspects of sex and sexuality,” he added. The report argues that millions of young people are missing out completely on CSE. It says that CSE delivery is often outdated and non-participatory and that teaching staff are not adequately trained and content focuses exclusively on health outcomes, rather than the recognition of rights. Too often CSE is scientifically inaccurate and solely geared to health outcomes. In particular, it emphasizes potential negative health risks, as opposed to seeing young people as sexual beings and recognizing the positive aspects of sexuality. The report also says that the most vulnerable young people, who often find themselves outside the school system, are excluded. IPPF believes gaps must be filled to ensure that CSE is also provided in non-formal settings outside the classroom, reaching the hardest to reach young people. Vesna Turmakovska works with young people with learning difficulties at IPPF’s Member Association in Macedonia. She said: “Sexuality is part of these young people’s lives; they’re sexual beings and they express their sexuality on a daily basis. Some parents were afraid that the very fact of learning about sexuality would encourage their children to have sexual relations. “We explained that it was about giving skills to their children to make them capable of defending themselves from potential abusers. We also explained that they need skills to become more independent in life, and need to be able to make a distinction between friendship and love.” The report demands three things. It calls on government worldwide to deliver high quality CSE that meets the needs of all young people in and out of schools. Secondly, governments, civil society organizations and health providers must make sure teachers, educational institutions and individuals who deliver CSE in both schools and non-formal settings are trained sufficiently and are confident in delivering sexuality education in a way that is positive and non-judgmental. Finally, educators and civil society should work with communities and parents to build support for CSE as well as a culture that supports choice and respect for young people and their sexual and reproductive health and rights. This report says implementing high quality CSE inside and outside schools is a necessity for governments worldwide, not a political choice. It says that to ignore the education of young people, to restrict their choices, to limit access to life-saving services and to deny their happiness   Notes to editors: For more information please contact a member of IPPF’s communications team. Marek Pruszewicz, Director of Communications [email protected]+44(0) 7740 631769   

Fiji
news item

| 22 March 2016

Emergency update from Fiji

One month on from Cyclone Winston, IPPF has helped hundreds of families, including new mothers and pregnant women. Thousands of people are disaplaced and 43 have now been confirmed dead in the worst tropical super-storm to have ever hit the Pacific.  IPPF’s humanitarian wing, the SPRINT Initiative, is solely funded by the Australian Government to provide life-saving sexual and reproductive health services following a humanitarian crisis. The Australian Government provided an additional AUD $100,000 to ensure SPRINT could respond to the worst affected populations.   IPPF’s assistance includes distributing hygiene and dignity kits to pregnant women and new mothers, providing maternal and neonatal healthcare, providing family planning and prevention programs to reduce the spread of sexually transmitted infections, including HIV.  There has been an urgent need to respond to the immediate sexual and reproductive health needs of communities, specifically vulnerable groups such as pregnant and lactating women and women & girls at risk of gender-based violence. In crisis settings rates of gender-based violence drastically increase, and SPRINT has provided survivors with emergency care and services. IPPF-SPRINT has reproductive health missions in the provinces of Nataleira, Natalecake, Vadravadra. The Ministry of Health, under the Fiji Government, has also committed their medical staff to IPPF's medical camps. A key partner to the humanitarian repsonse is IPPF's local member association, the Reproductive and Family Health Association of Fiji (RFHAF). The Australian Minister for Foreign Affairs, the Honourable Julie Bishop paid a visit to IPPF-SPRINT’s SRH mission in early March to observe the work of the Australian-funded response. The Minister also distributed hygiene kits to the affected population in Rakiraki hospital in western Fiji. Apart from providing key sexual reproductive services, IPPF-SPRINT is also providing basic medical assistance to those affected.  

Fiji
news_item

| 22 March 2016

Emergency update from Fiji

One month on from Cyclone Winston, IPPF has helped hundreds of families, including new mothers and pregnant women. Thousands of people are disaplaced and 43 have now been confirmed dead in the worst tropical super-storm to have ever hit the Pacific.  IPPF’s humanitarian wing, the SPRINT Initiative, is solely funded by the Australian Government to provide life-saving sexual and reproductive health services following a humanitarian crisis. The Australian Government provided an additional AUD $100,000 to ensure SPRINT could respond to the worst affected populations.   IPPF’s assistance includes distributing hygiene and dignity kits to pregnant women and new mothers, providing maternal and neonatal healthcare, providing family planning and prevention programs to reduce the spread of sexually transmitted infections, including HIV.  There has been an urgent need to respond to the immediate sexual and reproductive health needs of communities, specifically vulnerable groups such as pregnant and lactating women and women & girls at risk of gender-based violence. In crisis settings rates of gender-based violence drastically increase, and SPRINT has provided survivors with emergency care and services. IPPF-SPRINT has reproductive health missions in the provinces of Nataleira, Natalecake, Vadravadra. The Ministry of Health, under the Fiji Government, has also committed their medical staff to IPPF's medical camps. A key partner to the humanitarian repsonse is IPPF's local member association, the Reproductive and Family Health Association of Fiji (RFHAF). The Australian Minister for Foreign Affairs, the Honourable Julie Bishop paid a visit to IPPF-SPRINT’s SRH mission in early March to observe the work of the Australian-funded response. The Minister also distributed hygiene kits to the affected population in Rakiraki hospital in western Fiji. Apart from providing key sexual reproductive services, IPPF-SPRINT is also providing basic medical assistance to those affected.  

IPPF has been recognized in the GIZ Gender Prize 2016 competition which promotes gender mainstreaming. 
news item

| 10 March 2016

IPPF recognized in the GIZ Gender Prize 2016

IPPF has been recognized in the GIZ Gender Prize 2016 competition which promotes gender mainstreaming.  Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ), a leading provider of international cooperation services for sustainable development, holds an annual internal Gender Competition to promote creativity and innovation for gender equality in their sustainable development work. GIZ’s global BACKUP Health programme won first prize for promoting gender equality within programmes funded by the Global Fund to fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. The collaborative ‘Shadows and Light’ project with IPPF was highlighted for its gender transformative approach to sexual and reproductive health (SRH) and HIV services for all, including women and girls, men and boys, and anyone perceived to be outside of the norms that constitute what are ‘feminine’ and ‘masculine’, including lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex people. Delivered by IPPF Member Associations in Cameroon, Kenya, India and Uganda, the three-year project focused on men who have sex with men, sex workers, people who inject drugs, and transgender people – populations at increased risk of HIV and other STIs – and set out to improve the linked sexual and reproductive health and HIV needs of these key populations. Alan Smith, IPPF’s Senior Advisor, HIV said: “I am very pleased that IPPF is recognised - with our partners GIZ - for this gender award linked to International Women’s Day, in particular for our innovative Shadows and Light project which focusses on the rights of key populations and challenges traditional gender norms.” Other winners included a renewable energies and energy efficiency programme in Mexico and a vocational training and sustainable development initiative in Ghana.  Eighty seven teams from 52 countries participated in the competition which covered the fields of governance, economic development and employment, environment, climate change and biodiversity, agriculture and rural development, energy, public finance, education and health.  

IPPF has been recognized in the GIZ Gender Prize 2016 competition which promotes gender mainstreaming. 
news_item

| 10 March 2016

IPPF recognized in the GIZ Gender Prize 2016

IPPF has been recognized in the GIZ Gender Prize 2016 competition which promotes gender mainstreaming.  Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ), a leading provider of international cooperation services for sustainable development, holds an annual internal Gender Competition to promote creativity and innovation for gender equality in their sustainable development work. GIZ’s global BACKUP Health programme won first prize for promoting gender equality within programmes funded by the Global Fund to fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. The collaborative ‘Shadows and Light’ project with IPPF was highlighted for its gender transformative approach to sexual and reproductive health (SRH) and HIV services for all, including women and girls, men and boys, and anyone perceived to be outside of the norms that constitute what are ‘feminine’ and ‘masculine’, including lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex people. Delivered by IPPF Member Associations in Cameroon, Kenya, India and Uganda, the three-year project focused on men who have sex with men, sex workers, people who inject drugs, and transgender people – populations at increased risk of HIV and other STIs – and set out to improve the linked sexual and reproductive health and HIV needs of these key populations. Alan Smith, IPPF’s Senior Advisor, HIV said: “I am very pleased that IPPF is recognised - with our partners GIZ - for this gender award linked to International Women’s Day, in particular for our innovative Shadows and Light project which focusses on the rights of key populations and challenges traditional gender norms.” Other winners included a renewable energies and energy efficiency programme in Mexico and a vocational training and sustainable development initiative in Ghana.  Eighty seven teams from 52 countries participated in the competition which covered the fields of governance, economic development and employment, environment, climate change and biodiversity, agriculture and rural development, energy, public finance, education and health.  

Durex and IPPF logos
news item

| 05 August 2016

IPPF and Durex join forces to raise awareness of Zika as an STI

Global #DontShareZika campaign launched to spread the message with an educational video and condom giveaway.  As the global focus shifts to Brazil, the world’s leading sexual wellbeing brand Durex and the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) have joined forces to launch #DontShareZika, a global campaign to raise awareness of the Zika virus, educate about its status as a sexually transmitted infection (STI) and provide direct support by handing out millions of free condoms. We're working with @ippf to help stop the spread of #Zika. Want to help? Share this, but #DontShareZika… pic.twitter.com/hdhx51sEi2 — Durex Global (@durex) August 5, 2016 The move follows the update by the World Health Organization (WHO), confirming that in addition to being spread by infected mosquitoes, Zika* can also be transmitted sexually. This means that everyone - including people in a monogamous relationship - may be at risk from the STI if they, or their partner, have visited an affected area and been bitten by an infected mosquito. As an STI, the Zika virus has the potential to travel and spread between people who may not even realise they are infected. In response, Durex have created the #DontShareZika video to educate that the Zika virus can be passed between couples during unprotected sex, and committed to a giveaway of three million free condoms in Brazil. WHO recommends that men and women returning from an area where Zika is circulating should practice safer sex, including through the correct and consistent use of condoms, for at least eight weeks after leaving an affected area, even if they don’t have symptoms. At a time when Brazil is expecting as many as a million extra visitors from across the globe, the #DontShareZika campaign aims to spread this important message as widely as possible to limit the risk of further infections. #DontShareZika follows recent work by Durex lobbying for the world’s first safe sex emoji** designed to help young people discuss safe sex. Both initiatives are part of Durex’s continuous efforts for better sexual health and education globally. “As the world’s number one sexual wellbeing brand we have a responsibility to make people aware of this STI, to help people to stay healthy and to prevent the sexual transmission of the virus.” commented the Global Director ofRB the brand, Volker Sydow. IPPF Director General Tewodros Melesse, added; “Our aim is to ensure all people have access to sexual and reproductive health information and services. At the moment, many people still don’t realise that Zika can be transmitted sexually. Communicating this and enabling people to protect themselves and their partners is critical, so we welcome #DontShareZika and Durex’s free condom giveaway in Brazil.” Durex are calling for people to support the campaign and help share a message of protection and prevention faster than this STI, Zika, can be spread, by sharing the informative video and using the hashtag #DontShareZika. Follow @Durex for more information. For more information on the Zika virus visit: http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/zika/en/. -ENDS- For further information please contact Amy Williams: [email protected]/ 0207 292 5084 or Toby Leston: [email protected]/ 0207 2929 6451 Notes to Editors * Zika virus is linked to microcephaly - a condition where babies are born with brain damage and undeveloped heads. ** www.youtube.com/watch?v=O7iKgKpkWfU About Durex Durex® is the #1 sexual wellbeing brand worldwide. The brand not only produces condoms that exceeds global testing standards, but also offers pleasure gels, lubricants and personal massagers. With over 80 years of experience in the bedroom, Durex is dedicated to inspiring lovers to love sex safely. That is why Durex will never stop innovating with new products that enhance the sexual experience, helping couples get closer and go further together. For more information, go to www.Durex.com. About RB* RB is the world’s leading consumer health and hygiene company. The company has operations in over 60 countries, with headquarters in London, Dubai and Amsterdam, and sales in most countries across the globe. The company employs approximately c. 37,000 people worldwide. Inspired by a purpose to deliver innovative solutions for healthier lives and happier homes, RB is in the top 20 companies listed on the London Stock Exchange. We are the global No 1or No 2 in the majority of our fast-growing categories, driven by an exceptional focus on innovation. Our health, hygiene and home portfolio is led by our global Powerbrands including Nurofen, Strepsils Gaviscon, Mucinex, Durex, Scholl, Clearasil, Lysol, Dettol, Veet, Harpic, Cillit Bang, Mortein, Finish, Vanish, Calgon, Air Wick, Woolite and French’s. Our Powerbrands represent 80% of net revenue. RB is redefining the world of consumer health and hygiene. Our people and unique culture are at the heart of our success. We have a drive for achievement and a passion to outperform wherever we focus, including sustainability where we are targeting a 1/3 reduction in water impact, 1/3 reduction in carbon and 1/3 of net revenue from more sustainable products. We are proud to be Save the Children’s largest global partner, with a new vision to radically reduce one the world’s largest killer of under 5s, diarrhea. For more information visit www.rb.com. *RB is the trading name of Reckitt Benckiser group of companies About IPPF IPPF delivers sexual and reproductive health services that let people make their own choices. We fight for everyone to have the right to make those choices. We are local, through our members and volunteers, and global, through our network. We meet need, wherever it is, whoever requires it, for as long as they want it.

Durex and IPPF logos
news_item

| 05 August 2016

IPPF and Durex join forces to raise awareness of Zika as an STI

Global #DontShareZika campaign launched to spread the message with an educational video and condom giveaway.  As the global focus shifts to Brazil, the world’s leading sexual wellbeing brand Durex and the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) have joined forces to launch #DontShareZika, a global campaign to raise awareness of the Zika virus, educate about its status as a sexually transmitted infection (STI) and provide direct support by handing out millions of free condoms. We're working with @ippf to help stop the spread of #Zika. Want to help? Share this, but #DontShareZika… pic.twitter.com/hdhx51sEi2 — Durex Global (@durex) August 5, 2016 The move follows the update by the World Health Organization (WHO), confirming that in addition to being spread by infected mosquitoes, Zika* can also be transmitted sexually. This means that everyone - including people in a monogamous relationship - may be at risk from the STI if they, or their partner, have visited an affected area and been bitten by an infected mosquito. As an STI, the Zika virus has the potential to travel and spread between people who may not even realise they are infected. In response, Durex have created the #DontShareZika video to educate that the Zika virus can be passed between couples during unprotected sex, and committed to a giveaway of three million free condoms in Brazil. WHO recommends that men and women returning from an area where Zika is circulating should practice safer sex, including through the correct and consistent use of condoms, for at least eight weeks after leaving an affected area, even if they don’t have symptoms. At a time when Brazil is expecting as many as a million extra visitors from across the globe, the #DontShareZika campaign aims to spread this important message as widely as possible to limit the risk of further infections. #DontShareZika follows recent work by Durex lobbying for the world’s first safe sex emoji** designed to help young people discuss safe sex. Both initiatives are part of Durex’s continuous efforts for better sexual health and education globally. “As the world’s number one sexual wellbeing brand we have a responsibility to make people aware of this STI, to help people to stay healthy and to prevent the sexual transmission of the virus.” commented the Global Director ofRB the brand, Volker Sydow. IPPF Director General Tewodros Melesse, added; “Our aim is to ensure all people have access to sexual and reproductive health information and services. At the moment, many people still don’t realise that Zika can be transmitted sexually. Communicating this and enabling people to protect themselves and their partners is critical, so we welcome #DontShareZika and Durex’s free condom giveaway in Brazil.” Durex are calling for people to support the campaign and help share a message of protection and prevention faster than this STI, Zika, can be spread, by sharing the informative video and using the hashtag #DontShareZika. Follow @Durex for more information. For more information on the Zika virus visit: http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/zika/en/. -ENDS- For further information please contact Amy Williams: [email protected]/ 0207 292 5084 or Toby Leston: [email protected]/ 0207 2929 6451 Notes to Editors * Zika virus is linked to microcephaly - a condition where babies are born with brain damage and undeveloped heads. ** www.youtube.com/watch?v=O7iKgKpkWfU About Durex Durex® is the #1 sexual wellbeing brand worldwide. The brand not only produces condoms that exceeds global testing standards, but also offers pleasure gels, lubricants and personal massagers. With over 80 years of experience in the bedroom, Durex is dedicated to inspiring lovers to love sex safely. That is why Durex will never stop innovating with new products that enhance the sexual experience, helping couples get closer and go further together. For more information, go to www.Durex.com. About RB* RB is the world’s leading consumer health and hygiene company. The company has operations in over 60 countries, with headquarters in London, Dubai and Amsterdam, and sales in most countries across the globe. The company employs approximately c. 37,000 people worldwide. Inspired by a purpose to deliver innovative solutions for healthier lives and happier homes, RB is in the top 20 companies listed on the London Stock Exchange. We are the global No 1or No 2 in the majority of our fast-growing categories, driven by an exceptional focus on innovation. Our health, hygiene and home portfolio is led by our global Powerbrands including Nurofen, Strepsils Gaviscon, Mucinex, Durex, Scholl, Clearasil, Lysol, Dettol, Veet, Harpic, Cillit Bang, Mortein, Finish, Vanish, Calgon, Air Wick, Woolite and French’s. Our Powerbrands represent 80% of net revenue. RB is redefining the world of consumer health and hygiene. Our people and unique culture are at the heart of our success. We have a drive for achievement and a passion to outperform wherever we focus, including sustainability where we are targeting a 1/3 reduction in water impact, 1/3 reduction in carbon and 1/3 of net revenue from more sustainable products. We are proud to be Save the Children’s largest global partner, with a new vision to radically reduce one the world’s largest killer of under 5s, diarrhea. For more information visit www.rb.com. *RB is the trading name of Reckitt Benckiser group of companies About IPPF IPPF delivers sexual and reproductive health services that let people make their own choices. We fight for everyone to have the right to make those choices. We are local, through our members and volunteers, and global, through our network. We meet need, wherever it is, whoever requires it, for as long as they want it.

FPOP and IPPF-SPRINT staff working with displaced people in the Philippines
news item

| 02 August 2016

IPPF-SPRINT provides humanitarian assistance in conflict affected areas of North Cotabato, Philippines

Aug 2, 2016: New Delhi: Manila: The International Planned Parenthood Federation through its humanitarian wing, the SPRINT Initiative, is providing humanitarian assistance in the conflict-affected areas of Cotabato in the Philippines. The armed conflict between the Government of the Philippines (GPH) and the secessionist Moro Islamic Liberation Front (MILF) has lasted for more than five decades and has displaced around a million people in central Mindanao, Philippines. According to reports dated April 2016, the armed conflict has escalated, creating concerns over a protracted crisis and the vulnerability of women and girls. The conflict has internally displaced farmers who are living in the hinterland communities of the province of North Cotabato, namely in the municipalities of Makilala, Magpet, Kabacan and Tulunan. The SPRINT Initiative project will reach out to 25 affected villages or barangays located in geographically isolated and depressed areas, thereby making access to healthcare an extremely rare thing. As per the assessments done by IPPF’s East and South East Asia and Oceania Region office’s (ESEAOR) Member Association, the Family Planning Association of Philippines (FPOP), access to Sexual and Reproductive Health (SRH) services in these villages is very limited. “IPPF-SPRINT and FPOP will coordinate the implementation of this project with (the) UNFPA centre in Mindanao throughout the 4-month period from August to November, 2016. The Minimum Initial Service Package (MISP) will be implemented on-the-ground. IPPF-SPRINT will reach out to around 15,000 beneficiaries in the area and will provide crucial and life-saving SRH services. An amount of AUD 50,000 has been mobilised for the response,” said Aditi Ghosh, Director, IPPF-SPRINT. This humanitarian response is being funded by the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT) under the Australian government. “FPOP is a part of the UN cluster system, particularly Health and Protection clusters in the national level. FPOP will also coordinate the humanitarian response with UN regional centres covering affected areas. The North Cotabato Provincial Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council (DRRMC) will also play a key role in implementing the MISP,” said Nora Murat, Regional Director, IPPF-ESEAOR. IPPF-SPRINT will work on prevention and management of the consequences of sexual violence, reduction of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) including HIV transmission, prevention of excess maternal and neonatal mortality and morbidity, plan for the provision of comprehensive SRH services and integrate into primary health care as the situation permits.   Apart from the above, orientation on MISP and Risk Management for implementing partners and project staff/volunteers will be undertaken.     Contact info: Murali Kunduru: [email protected] Jayamalar Samuel: [email protected] Media Contact: Rhea Chawla: [email protected] www.ippf-sprint.org   The SPRINT Initiative is a Sexual and Reproductive Health (SRH) Programme in Crisis and Post-Crisis Situations. SPRINT ensures access to essential lifesaving SRH services for women, men and children in times of crises, a time when services are most needed yet are not prioritised or recognised by key humanitarian responders.   The SPRINT Initiative saves lives and delivers on behalf of the Australian Government aid program (DFAT: Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade), which aims to provide more effective preparedness for and response to disasters and crises.   The Initiative is managed by the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) and represents its commitment to increasing access to SRH services for crisis-affected populations. The International Planned Parenthood Federation is a global service provider and a leading advocate of sexual and reproductive health and rights for all. It is a worldwide movement of national organisations working with and for communities and individuals.  

FPOP and IPPF-SPRINT staff working with displaced people in the Philippines
news_item

| 02 August 2016

IPPF-SPRINT provides humanitarian assistance in conflict affected areas of North Cotabato, Philippines

Aug 2, 2016: New Delhi: Manila: The International Planned Parenthood Federation through its humanitarian wing, the SPRINT Initiative, is providing humanitarian assistance in the conflict-affected areas of Cotabato in the Philippines. The armed conflict between the Government of the Philippines (GPH) and the secessionist Moro Islamic Liberation Front (MILF) has lasted for more than five decades and has displaced around a million people in central Mindanao, Philippines. According to reports dated April 2016, the armed conflict has escalated, creating concerns over a protracted crisis and the vulnerability of women and girls. The conflict has internally displaced farmers who are living in the hinterland communities of the province of North Cotabato, namely in the municipalities of Makilala, Magpet, Kabacan and Tulunan. The SPRINT Initiative project will reach out to 25 affected villages or barangays located in geographically isolated and depressed areas, thereby making access to healthcare an extremely rare thing. As per the assessments done by IPPF’s East and South East Asia and Oceania Region office’s (ESEAOR) Member Association, the Family Planning Association of Philippines (FPOP), access to Sexual and Reproductive Health (SRH) services in these villages is very limited. “IPPF-SPRINT and FPOP will coordinate the implementation of this project with (the) UNFPA centre in Mindanao throughout the 4-month period from August to November, 2016. The Minimum Initial Service Package (MISP) will be implemented on-the-ground. IPPF-SPRINT will reach out to around 15,000 beneficiaries in the area and will provide crucial and life-saving SRH services. An amount of AUD 50,000 has been mobilised for the response,” said Aditi Ghosh, Director, IPPF-SPRINT. This humanitarian response is being funded by the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade (DFAT) under the Australian government. “FPOP is a part of the UN cluster system, particularly Health and Protection clusters in the national level. FPOP will also coordinate the humanitarian response with UN regional centres covering affected areas. The North Cotabato Provincial Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council (DRRMC) will also play a key role in implementing the MISP,” said Nora Murat, Regional Director, IPPF-ESEAOR. IPPF-SPRINT will work on prevention and management of the consequences of sexual violence, reduction of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) including HIV transmission, prevention of excess maternal and neonatal mortality and morbidity, plan for the provision of comprehensive SRH services and integrate into primary health care as the situation permits.   Apart from the above, orientation on MISP and Risk Management for implementing partners and project staff/volunteers will be undertaken.     Contact info: Murali Kunduru: [email protected] Jayamalar Samuel: [email protected] Media Contact: Rhea Chawla: [email protected] www.ippf-sprint.org   The SPRINT Initiative is a Sexual and Reproductive Health (SRH) Programme in Crisis and Post-Crisis Situations. SPRINT ensures access to essential lifesaving SRH services for women, men and children in times of crises, a time when services are most needed yet are not prioritised or recognised by key humanitarian responders.   The SPRINT Initiative saves lives and delivers on behalf of the Australian Government aid program (DFAT: Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade), which aims to provide more effective preparedness for and response to disasters and crises.   The Initiative is managed by the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) and represents its commitment to increasing access to SRH services for crisis-affected populations. The International Planned Parenthood Federation is a global service provider and a leading advocate of sexual and reproductive health and rights for all. It is a worldwide movement of national organisations working with and for communities and individuals.  

Four black women, looking at the camera. Gambia, ph:Chloe Hall
news item

| 20 July 2016

End gender based violence and HIV to ensure equity

18 July, Durban: Gender Based Violence (GBV) must be recognised and addressed if we are to end HIV and AIDS urged the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) and the United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women (UN Women) at a panel during the International AIDS Conference Monday. The impact of HIV among women and girls in all their diversity is significant and alarming. Women’s greater physical vulnerability to HIV is compounded by social norms, gender inequalities, poverty and violence. Women living with HIV are also more likely to face stigmatisation, infertility, and even abuse and abandonment, contributing to their disempowerment. In East and Southern Africa, the risk of HIV among women who have experienced violence maybe three times higher In Uganda and South Africa studies found women who experienced intimate partner violence were 50 per cent more likely to have HIV than women who had not experienced violence. In many countries in Africa, getting married is among the ‘riskiest’ behaviour for women, where they may be exposed to unprotected sex with a husband who has multiple sexual partners, and to underlying power dynamics between men and women that prevent women from accessing condoms and then insisting on their use. Julia Omondi, a 24 year old advocate from Family Health Options Kenya (FHOK) highlighted the most common root causes of gender based violence and HIV, ‘I work with a group of 50 young girls like myself, called the 3E advocates to prevent girls from child marriage; support girls who are living with HIV to understand their rights, make parents and communities aware of the laws that protect girls from child marriage. We need to raise our voices to stop child marriage and turn the tide against HIV’. “Empowerment + Engagement = Equality” is a joint project supported by UN Women and IPPF implemented in Kenya, Malawi and Uganda to address HIV vulnerability among adolescent girls and young women by engaging and empowering them. Traditional leaders like the senior chief Theresa Kachindamoto from Malawi spoke of her role to change harmful gender related practices, she said, ‘Chiefs as custodians of culture should be  at the forefront to end cultural practices that negatively affect people’s health like sexual cleansing (Fisi), chief blanket. My village is now a model for others and my fellow chiefs come to learn about the change I have brought to Dedtza district in Malawi.’      Nazneen Damji, Policy Advisor- gender equality, health and HIV/AIDS at UN Women, highlighted the recognition by global leaders on the importance of addressing GBV and HIV. “Violence, and the fear of violence, can play a major role in women’s reluctance to know her HIV status and seek care.  Fortunately, the Political Declaration on HIV/AIDS adopted in June at the UN General Assembly and the Resolution on women, the girl child and HIV adopted at the 60th Session of the Commission on the Status of Women both call on governments to intensify efforts to end all forms of violence against women and girls, including harmful practices that contribute to the spread of HIV amongst women and girls” ‘Civil society organisations like IPPF play an important part in holding governments accountable.  We shouldn’t underestimate our role as advocates to inform national, regional and global policies. If we are to address the dual epidemics of GBV and HIV we need to have progressive polices where perpetrators can be brought to justice and laws and policies uphold gender equality’  said  Zelda Nhlabatsi, the executive director of Family Life Association of Swaziland (FLAS). The session was sponsored  by IPPF Africa Region, UN Women and the Ford Foundation.    

Four black women, looking at the camera. Gambia, ph:Chloe Hall
news_item

| 20 July 2016

End gender based violence and HIV to ensure equity

18 July, Durban: Gender Based Violence (GBV) must be recognised and addressed if we are to end HIV and AIDS urged the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) and the United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women (UN Women) at a panel during the International AIDS Conference Monday. The impact of HIV among women and girls in all their diversity is significant and alarming. Women’s greater physical vulnerability to HIV is compounded by social norms, gender inequalities, poverty and violence. Women living with HIV are also more likely to face stigmatisation, infertility, and even abuse and abandonment, contributing to their disempowerment. In East and Southern Africa, the risk of HIV among women who have experienced violence maybe three times higher In Uganda and South Africa studies found women who experienced intimate partner violence were 50 per cent more likely to have HIV than women who had not experienced violence. In many countries in Africa, getting married is among the ‘riskiest’ behaviour for women, where they may be exposed to unprotected sex with a husband who has multiple sexual partners, and to underlying power dynamics between men and women that prevent women from accessing condoms and then insisting on their use. Julia Omondi, a 24 year old advocate from Family Health Options Kenya (FHOK) highlighted the most common root causes of gender based violence and HIV, ‘I work with a group of 50 young girls like myself, called the 3E advocates to prevent girls from child marriage; support girls who are living with HIV to understand their rights, make parents and communities aware of the laws that protect girls from child marriage. We need to raise our voices to stop child marriage and turn the tide against HIV’. “Empowerment + Engagement = Equality” is a joint project supported by UN Women and IPPF implemented in Kenya, Malawi and Uganda to address HIV vulnerability among adolescent girls and young women by engaging and empowering them. Traditional leaders like the senior chief Theresa Kachindamoto from Malawi spoke of her role to change harmful gender related practices, she said, ‘Chiefs as custodians of culture should be  at the forefront to end cultural practices that negatively affect people’s health like sexual cleansing (Fisi), chief blanket. My village is now a model for others and my fellow chiefs come to learn about the change I have brought to Dedtza district in Malawi.’      Nazneen Damji, Policy Advisor- gender equality, health and HIV/AIDS at UN Women, highlighted the recognition by global leaders on the importance of addressing GBV and HIV. “Violence, and the fear of violence, can play a major role in women’s reluctance to know her HIV status and seek care.  Fortunately, the Political Declaration on HIV/AIDS adopted in June at the UN General Assembly and the Resolution on women, the girl child and HIV adopted at the 60th Session of the Commission on the Status of Women both call on governments to intensify efforts to end all forms of violence against women and girls, including harmful practices that contribute to the spread of HIV amongst women and girls” ‘Civil society organisations like IPPF play an important part in holding governments accountable.  We shouldn’t underestimate our role as advocates to inform national, regional and global policies. If we are to address the dual epidemics of GBV and HIV we need to have progressive polices where perpetrators can be brought to justice and laws and policies uphold gender equality’  said  Zelda Nhlabatsi, the executive director of Family Life Association of Swaziland (FLAS). The session was sponsored  by IPPF Africa Region, UN Women and the Ford Foundation.    

Young people wearing the #KnowItOwnIt T-shirts
news item

| 23 May 2016

Global comprehensive sexuality education: “too little, too late, too biological” says new report

Sex education across the world is ‘too little, too late and too biological’, according to a new report released today by the world’s leading provider of sexual health services. The International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF), which works with partner organisations in 170 countries, is calling for all of the world’s 1.8 billion young people aged between 10 and 24 to get universal access to comprehensive sexuality education (CSE). A new report called: ‘Everyone’s Right to Know: delivering comprehensive sexuality education for all young people’ calls for more investment in, and better CSE for the largest youth population that the world has ever seen. IPPF says it is an issue that needs to be tackled urgently as the number of young people continues to rise. “The starting point, and the absolute minimum requirement, is that CSE must reach all young people – wherever they are,” according to the Director General of IPPF, Tewodros Melesse. “We cannot achieve gender transformative change by focusing only on health outcomes. We must equip young people with information about health as well as positive aspects of sex and sexuality,” he added. The report argues that millions of young people are missing out completely on CSE. It says that CSE delivery is often outdated and non-participatory and that teaching staff are not adequately trained and content focuses exclusively on health outcomes, rather than the recognition of rights. Too often CSE is scientifically inaccurate and solely geared to health outcomes. In particular, it emphasizes potential negative health risks, as opposed to seeing young people as sexual beings and recognizing the positive aspects of sexuality. The report also says that the most vulnerable young people, who often find themselves outside the school system, are excluded. IPPF believes gaps must be filled to ensure that CSE is also provided in non-formal settings outside the classroom, reaching the hardest to reach young people. Vesna Turmakovska works with young people with learning difficulties at IPPF’s Member Association in Macedonia. She said: “Sexuality is part of these young people’s lives; they’re sexual beings and they express their sexuality on a daily basis. Some parents were afraid that the very fact of learning about sexuality would encourage their children to have sexual relations. “We explained that it was about giving skills to their children to make them capable of defending themselves from potential abusers. We also explained that they need skills to become more independent in life, and need to be able to make a distinction between friendship and love.” The report demands three things. It calls on government worldwide to deliver high quality CSE that meets the needs of all young people in and out of schools. Secondly, governments, civil society organizations and health providers must make sure teachers, educational institutions and individuals who deliver CSE in both schools and non-formal settings are trained sufficiently and are confident in delivering sexuality education in a way that is positive and non-judgmental. Finally, educators and civil society should work with communities and parents to build support for CSE as well as a culture that supports choice and respect for young people and their sexual and reproductive health and rights. This report says implementing high quality CSE inside and outside schools is a necessity for governments worldwide, not a political choice. It says that to ignore the education of young people, to restrict their choices, to limit access to life-saving services and to deny their happiness   Notes to editors: For more information please contact a member of IPPF’s communications team. Marek Pruszewicz, Director of Communications [email protected]+44(0) 7740 631769   

Young people wearing the #KnowItOwnIt T-shirts
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| 17 May 2016

Global comprehensive sexuality education: “too little, too late, too biological” says new report

Sex education across the world is ‘too little, too late and too biological’, according to a new report released today by the world’s leading provider of sexual health services. The International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF), which works with partner organisations in 170 countries, is calling for all of the world’s 1.8 billion young people aged between 10 and 24 to get universal access to comprehensive sexuality education (CSE). A new report called: ‘Everyone’s Right to Know: delivering comprehensive sexuality education for all young people’ calls for more investment in, and better CSE for the largest youth population that the world has ever seen. IPPF says it is an issue that needs to be tackled urgently as the number of young people continues to rise. “The starting point, and the absolute minimum requirement, is that CSE must reach all young people – wherever they are,” according to the Director General of IPPF, Tewodros Melesse. “We cannot achieve gender transformative change by focusing only on health outcomes. We must equip young people with information about health as well as positive aspects of sex and sexuality,” he added. The report argues that millions of young people are missing out completely on CSE. It says that CSE delivery is often outdated and non-participatory and that teaching staff are not adequately trained and content focuses exclusively on health outcomes, rather than the recognition of rights. Too often CSE is scientifically inaccurate and solely geared to health outcomes. In particular, it emphasizes potential negative health risks, as opposed to seeing young people as sexual beings and recognizing the positive aspects of sexuality. The report also says that the most vulnerable young people, who often find themselves outside the school system, are excluded. IPPF believes gaps must be filled to ensure that CSE is also provided in non-formal settings outside the classroom, reaching the hardest to reach young people. Vesna Turmakovska works with young people with learning difficulties at IPPF’s Member Association in Macedonia. She said: “Sexuality is part of these young people’s lives; they’re sexual beings and they express their sexuality on a daily basis. Some parents were afraid that the very fact of learning about sexuality would encourage their children to have sexual relations. “We explained that it was about giving skills to their children to make them capable of defending themselves from potential abusers. We also explained that they need skills to become more independent in life, and need to be able to make a distinction between friendship and love.” The report demands three things. It calls on government worldwide to deliver high quality CSE that meets the needs of all young people in and out of schools. Secondly, governments, civil society organizations and health providers must make sure teachers, educational institutions and individuals who deliver CSE in both schools and non-formal settings are trained sufficiently and are confident in delivering sexuality education in a way that is positive and non-judgmental. Finally, educators and civil society should work with communities and parents to build support for CSE as well as a culture that supports choice and respect for young people and their sexual and reproductive health and rights. This report says implementing high quality CSE inside and outside schools is a necessity for governments worldwide, not a political choice. It says that to ignore the education of young people, to restrict their choices, to limit access to life-saving services and to deny their happiness   Notes to editors: For more information please contact a member of IPPF’s communications team. Marek Pruszewicz, Director of Communications [email protected]+44(0) 7740 631769   

Fiji
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| 22 March 2016

Emergency update from Fiji

One month on from Cyclone Winston, IPPF has helped hundreds of families, including new mothers and pregnant women. Thousands of people are disaplaced and 43 have now been confirmed dead in the worst tropical super-storm to have ever hit the Pacific.  IPPF’s humanitarian wing, the SPRINT Initiative, is solely funded by the Australian Government to provide life-saving sexual and reproductive health services following a humanitarian crisis. The Australian Government provided an additional AUD $100,000 to ensure SPRINT could respond to the worst affected populations.   IPPF’s assistance includes distributing hygiene and dignity kits to pregnant women and new mothers, providing maternal and neonatal healthcare, providing family planning and prevention programs to reduce the spread of sexually transmitted infections, including HIV.  There has been an urgent need to respond to the immediate sexual and reproductive health needs of communities, specifically vulnerable groups such as pregnant and lactating women and women & girls at risk of gender-based violence. In crisis settings rates of gender-based violence drastically increase, and SPRINT has provided survivors with emergency care and services. IPPF-SPRINT has reproductive health missions in the provinces of Nataleira, Natalecake, Vadravadra. The Ministry of Health, under the Fiji Government, has also committed their medical staff to IPPF's medical camps. A key partner to the humanitarian repsonse is IPPF's local member association, the Reproductive and Family Health Association of Fiji (RFHAF). The Australian Minister for Foreign Affairs, the Honourable Julie Bishop paid a visit to IPPF-SPRINT’s SRH mission in early March to observe the work of the Australian-funded response. The Minister also distributed hygiene kits to the affected population in Rakiraki hospital in western Fiji. Apart from providing key sexual reproductive services, IPPF-SPRINT is also providing basic medical assistance to those affected.  

Fiji
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| 22 March 2016

Emergency update from Fiji

One month on from Cyclone Winston, IPPF has helped hundreds of families, including new mothers and pregnant women. Thousands of people are disaplaced and 43 have now been confirmed dead in the worst tropical super-storm to have ever hit the Pacific.  IPPF’s humanitarian wing, the SPRINT Initiative, is solely funded by the Australian Government to provide life-saving sexual and reproductive health services following a humanitarian crisis. The Australian Government provided an additional AUD $100,000 to ensure SPRINT could respond to the worst affected populations.   IPPF’s assistance includes distributing hygiene and dignity kits to pregnant women and new mothers, providing maternal and neonatal healthcare, providing family planning and prevention programs to reduce the spread of sexually transmitted infections, including HIV.  There has been an urgent need to respond to the immediate sexual and reproductive health needs of communities, specifically vulnerable groups such as pregnant and lactating women and women & girls at risk of gender-based violence. In crisis settings rates of gender-based violence drastically increase, and SPRINT has provided survivors with emergency care and services. IPPF-SPRINT has reproductive health missions in the provinces of Nataleira, Natalecake, Vadravadra. The Ministry of Health, under the Fiji Government, has also committed their medical staff to IPPF's medical camps. A key partner to the humanitarian repsonse is IPPF's local member association, the Reproductive and Family Health Association of Fiji (RFHAF). The Australian Minister for Foreign Affairs, the Honourable Julie Bishop paid a visit to IPPF-SPRINT’s SRH mission in early March to observe the work of the Australian-funded response. The Minister also distributed hygiene kits to the affected population in Rakiraki hospital in western Fiji. Apart from providing key sexual reproductive services, IPPF-SPRINT is also providing basic medical assistance to those affected.  

IPPF has been recognized in the GIZ Gender Prize 2016 competition which promotes gender mainstreaming. 
news item

| 10 March 2016

IPPF recognized in the GIZ Gender Prize 2016

IPPF has been recognized in the GIZ Gender Prize 2016 competition which promotes gender mainstreaming.  Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ), a leading provider of international cooperation services for sustainable development, holds an annual internal Gender Competition to promote creativity and innovation for gender equality in their sustainable development work. GIZ’s global BACKUP Health programme won first prize for promoting gender equality within programmes funded by the Global Fund to fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. The collaborative ‘Shadows and Light’ project with IPPF was highlighted for its gender transformative approach to sexual and reproductive health (SRH) and HIV services for all, including women and girls, men and boys, and anyone perceived to be outside of the norms that constitute what are ‘feminine’ and ‘masculine’, including lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex people. Delivered by IPPF Member Associations in Cameroon, Kenya, India and Uganda, the three-year project focused on men who have sex with men, sex workers, people who inject drugs, and transgender people – populations at increased risk of HIV and other STIs – and set out to improve the linked sexual and reproductive health and HIV needs of these key populations. Alan Smith, IPPF’s Senior Advisor, HIV said: “I am very pleased that IPPF is recognised - with our partners GIZ - for this gender award linked to International Women’s Day, in particular for our innovative Shadows and Light project which focusses on the rights of key populations and challenges traditional gender norms.” Other winners included a renewable energies and energy efficiency programme in Mexico and a vocational training and sustainable development initiative in Ghana.  Eighty seven teams from 52 countries participated in the competition which covered the fields of governance, economic development and employment, environment, climate change and biodiversity, agriculture and rural development, energy, public finance, education and health.  

IPPF has been recognized in the GIZ Gender Prize 2016 competition which promotes gender mainstreaming. 
news_item

| 10 March 2016

IPPF recognized in the GIZ Gender Prize 2016

IPPF has been recognized in the GIZ Gender Prize 2016 competition which promotes gender mainstreaming.  Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ), a leading provider of international cooperation services for sustainable development, holds an annual internal Gender Competition to promote creativity and innovation for gender equality in their sustainable development work. GIZ’s global BACKUP Health programme won first prize for promoting gender equality within programmes funded by the Global Fund to fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. The collaborative ‘Shadows and Light’ project with IPPF was highlighted for its gender transformative approach to sexual and reproductive health (SRH) and HIV services for all, including women and girls, men and boys, and anyone perceived to be outside of the norms that constitute what are ‘feminine’ and ‘masculine’, including lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex people. Delivered by IPPF Member Associations in Cameroon, Kenya, India and Uganda, the three-year project focused on men who have sex with men, sex workers, people who inject drugs, and transgender people – populations at increased risk of HIV and other STIs – and set out to improve the linked sexual and reproductive health and HIV needs of these key populations. Alan Smith, IPPF’s Senior Advisor, HIV said: “I am very pleased that IPPF is recognised - with our partners GIZ - for this gender award linked to International Women’s Day, in particular for our innovative Shadows and Light project which focusses on the rights of key populations and challenges traditional gender norms.” Other winners included a renewable energies and energy efficiency programme in Mexico and a vocational training and sustainable development initiative in Ghana.  Eighty seven teams from 52 countries participated in the competition which covered the fields of governance, economic development and employment, environment, climate change and biodiversity, agriculture and rural development, energy, public finance, education and health.