HIV and STIs

The majority of HIV infections are sexually transmitted or are associated with pregnancy, childbirth and breastfeeding. 

Our work links prevention with treatment, care and support, reduces HIV-related stigma and discrimination, and responds to unique regional and national characteristics of the epidemic.

Having to stop crucial HIV prevention work with immediate effect was quite a shock for Chipili Mulemfwe, former services delivery manager at the USAID Open doors project run by Planned Parenthood Association of Zambia.
34-year-old Thomas talks about the impact funding cuts have had on his role as a peer educator, and the reduction of outreach services within the wider community; particularly for those needing HIV health care.
When Joyce tested positive for HIV, she wasn't ready to start taking medication but with the help, guidance and support of Planned Parenthood Association of Zambia (PPAZ), she successfully started her treatment and began to feel happier about her situation. But now, the Global Gag Rule threatens her future.
For 50 years, the Planned Parenthood Association of Zambia (PPAZ) has provided sexual and reproductive health care, including contraception, safe abortion, HIV treatment. The reinstatement of the Global Gag Rule by the US administration has forced the organisation to shut down life-saving services to key populations.
Joseph talks about the challenges of accessing quality and confidential health care as a young gay man living in Botswana.
Jackie is a peer outreach worker who encourages local sex workers to attend the Nkaikela Youth Group where BOFWA nurses provide vital health care.
The Botswana Family Welfare Association (BOFWA) has been providing sexual and reproductive health care since 1988. Yet, since the Global Gag Rule was reintroduced in January 2017, this vital care and support for local communities can no longer continue due to loss of funding.
In pictures: local communities impacted by the loss of US funding for HIV outreach services.
It was the lure of something to eat and a free subway card that persuaded Manny Norman to visit Project Street Beat's 'Safety Counts sessions. From there he slowly began to regain control of his life, from rebuilding his family life to training as an HIV outreach worker. This is his story.
Eric Fairchild went from a substance user to an HIV prevention specialist with Planned Parenthood's Project Street Beat. A mobile medical unit in New York. His mission, to use his experience to connect with substance users to show them there is a way to rebuild their lives.