Contraception

One of our main priorities is to ensure universal access to, and informed use of effective contraception. Millions of people lack the knowledge and information to determine when or whether they have children, and they are unable to protect themselves against sexually transmitted infections (STIs).

The Adolescent and Youth Friendly Services (SAAJ) center - supported by the Women’s Integrated Sexual Health (WISH2ACTION) programme - is helping young mothers like Arnilda access much needed healthcare.
The year marks the 60th anniversary of the game-changing contraceptive pill. It allowed people to take real ownership over if and when they had children, and how many they had, giving them control over their lives in a way that had never been seen before.
Dr Zarka Riaz is a gynecologist at the Family Health Model Clinic in Rawalpindi, Pakistan. One of the biggest issues women in her community face is access to contraception. However, things are changing for the better thanks to Women’s Integrated Sexual Health (WISH2ACTION) programme.
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It is estimated that 1 in 3 (35%) women worldwide have experienced physical and/or sexual violence from an intimate partner and/or sexual violence by a non‑partner in their lifetime, with the majority of this violence being intimate partner violence.
In Ethiopia, getting young people’s attention about sexual and reproductive healthcare is no easy task. But at a youth centre in Jimma, groups of young people are getting vital messages about sexual health and contraception out to their peers through dance, song, and poetry.
In the rural part of Ethiopia where Rewda Kedir works as a midwife, only 14% of married women are using any method of contraception, despite many wanting to. Having open – if challenging – conversations with families is one way her clinic lets people know what their contraceptive options are.
Women living in rural areas of Ethiopia often lack access to comprehensive sexual and reproductive healthcare. Family Planning Association of Ethiopia (FGAE) are expanding their free services in remote clinics to ensure no woman is left behind.
At a small clinic in Jimma, Ethiopia, a group of female volunteers prepare for their day educating sex workers about STIs, HIV and contraceptives, and distribute condoms. They encourage people to access the healthcare available at a confidential clinic set up to help at-risk and underserved populations including sex workers.
Women often have to hide their sexual and reproductive health issues and concerns, for fear of stigmatization, or even coercion and violence. Nurse Leias Obed knows how to work around this.
It’s estimated that 214m women and girls are not using modern contraception despite wanting to avoid pregnancy. And this was before the COVID-19 pandemic, which is set to further derail access to contraception for women and girls globally.