Contraception

One of our main priorities is to ensure universal access to, and informed use of effective contraception. Millions of people lack the knowledge and information to determine when or whether they have children, and they are unable to protect themselves against sexually transmitted infections (STIs).

Alinafe runs one of the Family Planning Association of Malawi's mobile clinics in the village of Chigude. Under the hot midday sun, she patiently answering the questions of staff, volunteers and clients – all while heavily pregnant herself.
Mary is a 30-year-old sex worker, trained by the Family Planning Association of Malawi to work as a sex worker peer educator through the Linkages project.
In Chigude, a usually quiet rural village in northern Malawi, young people gather around two tables laughing and chatting animatedly. On one table, they are playing a traditional mancala board game Bawo. On the other, volunteers demonstrate putting a condom ...
Abdoulaye Camara is the best dancer in the neighbourhood, and he’s not afraid to show it. Abdoulaye’s moves aren't just for fun. He's head of the dance troupe of the Youth Action Movement, belonging to the Association Malienne pour la Protection et la Promotion de la Famille, which uses dance and comedy sketches to talk about sex.
The Adolescent and Youth Friendly Services (SAAJ) center - supported by the Women’s Integrated Sexual Health (WISH2ACTION) programme - is helping young mothers like Arnilda access much needed healthcare.
The year marks the 60th anniversary of the game-changing contraceptive pill. It allowed people to take real ownership over if and when they had children, and how many they had, giving them control over their lives in a way that had never been seen before.
Dr Zarka Riaz is a gynecologist at the Family Health Model Clinic in Rawalpindi, Pakistan. One of the biggest issues women in her community face is access to contraception. However, things are changing for the better thanks to Women’s Integrated Sexual Health (WISH2ACTION) programme.
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Publication
It is estimated that 1 in 3 (35%) women worldwide have experienced physical and/or sexual violence from an intimate partner and/or sexual violence by a non‑partner in their lifetime, with the majority of this violence being intimate partner violence.
In Ethiopia, getting young people’s attention about sexual and reproductive healthcare is no easy task. But at a youth centre in Jimma, groups of young people are getting vital messages about sexual health and contraception out to their peers through dance, song, and poetry.
In the rural part of Ethiopia where Rewda Kedir works as a midwife, only 14% of married women are using any method of contraception, despite many wanting to. Having open – if challenging – conversations with families is one way her clinic lets people know what their contraceptive options are.