Gynaecological

Raising three children by herself, Lijana did not have time to think about her health. That was until she could no longe ignore the feeling that something was wrong. Through friends, she discovered the Albanian Centre of Population and Development (ACDP) clinic. It changed her life.
Eleanor's first cervical cancer screening came back negative. Three years later at her follow-up appointment, she expected the same negative result. Unfortunately, this time it was positive. Once she successfully completed her treatment, her experience turned her into an ardent activist for cervical cancer prevention in her community.
Through social media, 21-year-old Artemisa Seraj stumbled across a post from Aulona center, offering free workshops and seminars on sexual and reproductive healthcare. Curious to learn more about the 'taboo' subject, she attended a talk and was immediately convinced that she wanted to do more to empower women and girls in her community.
Hatixhe is a nurse at the Albanian Centre of Population and Development clinic. With 39 years of experience in gynaecology, she has seen vast improvements in access and services, and believes VIA and cryotherapy is a step further in the right direction for women's healthcare.
Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer among women and girls in Albania. Financial and physical barriers often mean many delay seeking medical advice, especially those that live in rural areas. Understanding the unmet need for rural women, Albanian Centre of Population and Development introduced a faster, more cost and time effective screening tool.
Resource type
Video
IPPF member association SOFHA (Somaliland Family Health Association) are working hard to educate their local communities on the harm of female genital mutilation (FGM). Slowly, but surely, attitudes are changing.
Amal Ahmed, the executive director of our Member Association in Somaliland (SOFHA) recounts her personal experience of being one of the 97-98% of young girls forced to undergo female genital mutilation in Somaliland.
Since 2014, the Irish Family Planning Association (IFPA) has provided comprehensive medical and psychological care to women and girls in Ireland who have experienced FGM. The FGM Treatment Service is publicly funded which enables the IFPA to provide care to affected women and girls free of charge.
Female genital mutilation (FGM) is a form of violence against women and girls, IPPF are working with member associations to help put a stop to the dangerous practice that affects millions of girls and women worldwide.
On 23rd January 2017, President Trump signed an order reinstating the Global Gag Rule (GGR). An order that has denied millions of US dollars in vital funding to organisations who did not sign the order that targets abortion. IPPF visited Burundi to document the impact of the GGR on the ground.